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Current Readings

Big Jets Get Squeezed

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The friendly skies aren’t for the wide-body models of Boeing and Airbus. Factors that include lower fuel costs, traffic management and travel destinations, and regional and global politics are threatening demand for the older as well as the newer models of the larger planes.

Why Suppliers Will Still Play With Toys ‘R’ Us

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Struggling retailer Toys "R" Us Inc. filed for bankruptcy after 40 percent of its suppliers asked for cash on delivery. But many key suppliers, like Hasbro Inc. and Mattel Inc., are helping the company recover to keep them in the marketplace.

Debrief: Ginni Rometty, CEO, IBM

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Among well-known technology companies doing cutting edge work, at 106 years old, IBM may well be the oldest. Its current CEO, Ginni Rometty, appreciates this history and is focused on reinventing the company for the next generation. Gender equity and diversity issues plague many technologies firms, and Romney sees herself as a role model even as she recognizes a longstanding inclusive culture within IBM.

Man vs. Machine: Architecture

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Software and hardware are moving at great speed to use artificial intelligence in rapid iteration environments. One area that is particularly shows potential gain is that of design. New software from Autodesk Research has shown particular promise by modifying older designs to seek efficient solutions far more quickly than could be accomplished by drafting new plans. Despite these gains, experts believe it is still necessary to have trained humans coupled with excellent software to reach the best conclusion.

The Great Corporate Cash Shell Game

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

U.S. corporations have a record amount of cash but they're more deeply indebted than ever. A disproportionate amount of the cash is in overseas accounts, so the companies are borrowing to raise needed cash at home and avoid the high repatriation taxes. That cash is not doing much to create new jobs and higher salaries but is mostly funding share repurchases.

The Trump-Loving Lawyer Who Won’t Stop Suing Fox News

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Douglas Wigdor, a life-long Republican, has risen to prominence as an anti-discrimination lawyer based on his multiple cases against Fox News.

America’s Relationship with Mark Zuckerberg is ‘It’s Complicated’

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Facebook has 2 billion users, record profits, vast influence, and big problems in Washington. While on paternity leave, Facebook’s CEO has been unable to avoid what’s become a second full-time job: managing an escalating series of political crises.

Why Suppliers Will Still Play With Toys ‘R’ Us

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Marketing

Toys "R" Us Inc. will live because manufacturers such as Mattel and Hasbro can’t let it die. They are offering pledges of support to counter Amazon and Wal-Mart and are propping up this single-category store.

Ghana Pays The Price of Cheap Cocoa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Worldwide cocoa prices have fallen about 40 percent over the past three years, as good harvests have led to a growth in supply without much to change demand. As part of a measure to help support cocoa farmers, the Ghana Cocoa Board guarantees that farmers receive a set price per pound. But with falling worldwide cocoa prices and with costs incurred by the Ghana Cocoa Board, the board loses money on every transaction. Complicating matters is the fact that growers from neighboring Ivory Coast smuggle their beans into Ghana in order to obtain the higher prices, which further strains the government of Ghana's ability to maintain its high prices.

Game of Kings

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

For more than two decades, Russian grandmaster Lev Alburt has taught strategy, patience, and prognostication to the finest in finance.

Game Changer: Eric Rodenbeck

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Expelled from Cooper Union, the son of German immigrants finds a way to express his passion for patterns, numbers, and images to communicate big concepts in an award-winning way.

6 Ways Millennials Can Overcome Their Stereotypes, From a Millennial CEO

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

A millennial CEO lays out a six-step strategy to overcome the stereotypical impressions the generation of those in management has about 18- to 35-year-olds.

Big Jets Get Squeezed

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

The sustained low prices for jet fuel, combined with turmoil in the Middle East and new operating models by airline carriers, have put a squeeze on the demand for large, wide-body jets from Boeing Co. and Airbus SE.

Why Suppliers Will Still Play With Toys 'R' Us

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Now that Toys "R" Us Inc. is in bankruptcy, how will it report soon-to-be restructured debt in financial reports? And how will creditors and their auditors decide what value to put on their claims against the company? This example provides an excellent backdrop for accounting students to review and understand the critical accounting rules for troubled debt and its potential restructuring.

Japan Isn't Getting Its Share of Gaming Gold

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

There is a lot of money to be made at gaming tournaments. However, laws in Japan prevent gaming competition.

Thank You for Calling Equifax. Your Business Is Not Important to Us.

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Consumers may lose their credit identities. Already two Equifax senior executives have lost their jobs — although others may have acted to not lose their personal investments in Equifax stock, which lost a third of its value within a week. What can an individual do now, and what can the industry do to not only monitor credit worthiness but also reliability?

After the Deluge, Inc.

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

When we watch coverage of natural disasters, we're repeatedly told of the enormous losses in dollars, like estimates of $58 billion from Irma in Florida. Cavalry Construction is one of the legion of firms in the reconstruction business that has been growing with the increasing size and frequency of natural disasters.

After the Deluge, Inc.

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Honesty is not always the common policy in the reconstruction business. But Frank Jones’ straight-shooter rule of customer service has seen his company grow by 10 percent annually since the proliferation of hurricanes, tornadoes, and hailstorms.

So You Want to Move to the U.S.?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

A minor industry has developed in visas through the EB-5 program. The EB-5 program lets immigrants obtain residency visas in exchange for investing at least $500,000 in distressed areas in the United States.

Junk-Bond King Sees Profit in Trampling Market He Built

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Michael Milken is right to point out that private equity is getting rich in no small part because of the lax practices of bond investors. But if these buyout firms go too far, they risk jeopardizing their own success.

How India Tripped Itself Up

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The Indian government’s cash ban and tax overhaul will depress growth in 2017. Economic data released on August 31, 2017, showed that growth slowed to a rate of 5.7 percent in the three months that ended June 30 from 7.9 percent a year earlier. This slowdown represents India’s weakest pace of economic growth since 2014. In addition, due to the slowed economic growth, foreign investors pulled $1.7 billion out of Indian equities in August. But polls show Indian voters have not lost faith in the government’s ability to steer the economy.

Your Next Phone Will Probably Cost $1,000

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Marketing

The smartphone makers and carriers are going to greater lengths to disguise the rising costs of their phones, which are about to cross a big psychological threshold. Apple’s next iPhone and the latest Samsung Note approach four figures.

Piecing Together a Credit Fraud

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Fraudsters are finding it harder to get away with using fake plastic. Scammers are constructing fake people to get real credit cards.

Innovation SuperSensor

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Gierad Laput, a doctoral student at Carnegie Mellon's Future Interfaces Group, has developed a sensor that resides in a room and relays information on potentially important changes in the room's environment relating to several appliances or units there. This is an improvement because customer won't have to have separate sensors for each unit. Funding to further explore the possibilities of monetizing this innovation has already reached $2.2 million.

Workers of Silicon Valley Unite!

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Silicon Valley companies are a tale of two workers. Tech company employees enjoy good wages and benefits. Many service workers on the tech company campuses, however, are employed by contractors and receive much lower wages and fewer benefits. By focusing attention on the well-known tech companies, labor unions are successfully organizing contract workers.

5 Things to Do for Your Career in Your 20s

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

In their early twenties, most people start down their career path and start making their way up. It's not the time to sit back and wait for future opportunities to fall in your lap.

5 Ways Emotional Intelligence Predicts Your Success

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

It may be difficult to believe, but being the smartest person in the room isn't always enough to succeed in business. The ability to relate to people is the ultimate benchmark for success.

Germany Stays in the Center

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Globalism is alive and well in Germany, where 46 percent of GDP comes from exports. While large, well-known manufacturing firms are responsible for some of these exports, so are the much smaller, privately owned German manufacturing firms that export goods worldwide. Delo Industrie Klebstoffe GmbH, for example, makes the glue used in 80 percent of smart cards worldwide.

This Is the Crazy Tax Math Trump Must Master, Fast

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Long ago Congress passed reforms indicating that permanent tax cuts need to be budget neutral relative to the deficit. That's making it very difficult to develop a strategy that aligns with the promised reduction in corporate taxes.

Your Next Phone Will Probably Cost $1,000

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Your new smartphone could cost you more than $1,000. Will you line up to get one?

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