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Current Readings

Buy Me Some Peanuts and Debt Downgrades

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Communities, large and small, take pride in having sports teams playing in their hometowns. Although sporting events do generate economic benefits, the costs often exceed those benefits. The costs to communities that finance stadiums can be a significant amount of their general operating budgets.

Lawyers Attack Rivals in TV Spots

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Marketing

Increased competition leads to more—and nastier—ads. Competition for clients is pushing up lawyer ad spending, which jumped to $823 million in 2015.

At America's Busiest Port, High Speed Robotic Stevedores on Wheels

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Commercial shipments currently produce half of Califiornia’s toxic diesel-soot emissions. Autonomous technology/self-driving could revolutionize freight transport. Its impact is rivaling that of containerization, which eliminated most manual sorting and warehousing on docks after World War II.

Detroit Has Valley Envy

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Mobility services, think Uber with self-driving cars, have the potential to disrupt the auto industry model of individual car ownership. So Detroit is seeking alliances with the tech companies and car sharing services behind that threat to strengthen their position.

Russia Could Be Headed for Deflation

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

A two-year economic contraction has led to a collapse in consumer demand. Russians are increasingly looking for savings on purchases and that is driving prices lower.

The Cost of Resistance

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

LabMD, a medical testing company, has been in a protracted legal fight with the Federal Trade Commission over leaks of billing data for 9,000 consumers. LabMD is now closed, but the owner is continuing the legal battle.

What's Not To Love?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Despite the popularity of the hit musical Hamilton, his pro-business and big-government ideas would not have made him popular today. His economic nationalism was a pragmatic search for policies that worked, regardless of ideology. But if they were tailored to better fit the current realities, Hamilton's views could be just what the country needs now.

An East German Challenge to the Swiss

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Last year, watch exports from Germany rose 14 percent, while Swiss watch exports fell 3 percent. Part of the difference in magnitude is driven by the significantly smaller size of the German watchmaking industry, but underlying economics help explain the trends. As the euro has fallen in value relative to the Swiss franc, German watches are relatively more affordable.

A New Dimension for Post-PC Taiwan

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

As the technological world shifts to phone and portable methods of operation, the PC market has been dwindling. Mass manufacturers need to use their capacity for new products, and 3D printers seem to provide a new growth oriented market.

Who's Alexa?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Amazon.com's Echo is not your typical touch screen device. It is a voice-controlled smart speaker.

Yahoo! is Worth Approximately -$8 Billion

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Yahoo is for sale, and the price tag is looking to be less than the sum of the parts! To everyone's frustration, this may not look like the typical textbook illustration of acquisition accounting.

At T-Mobile, It's Union vs. Sort-of-Union

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

An effort by the Communications Workers of America (CWA) to unionize T-Mobile has so far resulted in two union contracts that cover 30 workers. T-Mobile claims that its internal T-Voice system of engagement with employees helps management understand issues that are important to employees. The CWA, however, contends this is a union-busting tactic that was outlawed in the 1930s.

Sharing Everything But the Wealth

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Revenue on sharing businesses should be taxed based on the location of the services rendered. While individuals who directly provide the service — be it an Uber ride or an Airbnb getaway — pay the taxes on income to them, the sharing sponsor tends to shift revenues to low tax jurisdictions, such as Ireland or Bermuda. As the popularity of sharing services continues to grow, the fairness of who pays taxes to whom, and where, is also growing as a political and fiscal debate.

Sharing Everything But the Wealth

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The sharing economy doesn’t share the wealth. For instance, Airbnb’s more than forty subsidiaries may help the company lower its tax bill in the United States and other countries. Several countries are trying to crack down on corporate tax avoidance.

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Marketing

The U.S. television industry produced more than 400 scripted series last year, a record. That’s causing shortages. An explosion in American television production is threatening to overwhelm filming facilities from California to Canada and Georgia.

Sharing Everything But the Wealth

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Companies in the sharing economy like Uber and Airbnb pose a challenge for cities and states around the globe that are missing out on billions of dollars of tax revenue. Some cities and states around the globe have fought to make them play by the same rules as other businesses but without much success. Now the the battle is likely to shift to the national level, where billions of dollars a year in corporate taxes could be at risk.

Reclaiming Instant

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The Impossible Project aims to revive the business of making instant film and cameras that once put Polaroid at the top of the tech world. *This article is not available online.

States Pay a Price for Being LGBT-Unfriendly

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

A number of corporations have objected to North Carolina HB2, which blocks local ordinances that extend public accommodations to LGBT residents. Governor McCrory says the goal of HB2 is to guarantee “the expectation of privacy” in schools and other public places. *This article is not available online.

More Women May Sit in the Front of the Plane

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Asia's air travel business is growing rapidly, as an emerging middle class seeks more opportunities to travel. This has been good news for Asia's airlines but is causing a strain on airlines' ability to service the demand. A possible solution is to increase the number of women pilots, who worldwide only comprise 5 percent of commercial pilots. Traditional expectations and work requirements make it hard for many women to rise through the ranks and become commercial pilots.

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

The explosion in original television production has significantly increased the demand for products, services, and infrastructure needed to produce television programming. This has resulted in many shortages and, ultimately, increases in prices.

Innovation Laser-Guided Catheters

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Avinger has created a laser that can guide cardiologists as they navigate the complex system of arteries when operating to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The technology replaces external X-rays, which are more cumbersome and not as clear.

A Chance to See Spot Sequenced

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

What is the ancestry of your dog? Embark Veterinary wants to help you find out.

Sharing Everything But the Wealth

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Changing technology and business models are contributing to lost revenue for the Internal Revenue Service. The burgeoning tax strategies and off-shoring efforts of businesses in the so-called sharing economy are costing the U.S. government billions.

Can Lincoln and Caddy Find Fans in China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is the world's largest car market, and the luxury segment is growing quickly. While Mercedes, BMW, and Audi have done well in capturing market share, other competitors are trying to pick up a portion of this lucrative market. In January, General Motors opened a Cadillac plant in Shanghai, which will help it avoid import taxes of about 25 percent. Ford is also opening specialized showrooms for its Lincoln brand, offering the same level of customer service as a five-star hotel.

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