Competencies

Readings: Communication

GM Jumps Ahead in Self-Driving Cars

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Self-driving cars are coming. But who is producing them?

Can Sports Licensing Score Outside the United States?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

U.S. fans spend billions buying products that reinforce their association with sports teams, including common items such as caps, T-shirts, drinking mugs, and jerseys. Fanatics, a Florida-based firm that has licensing deals with the NFL and other sports groups, sells these items in addition to more obscure merchandise such as corn hole sets, branded grill covers, and bikinis. With a $1 billion investment from Japan's SoftBank, it is hoping to expand internationally by selling licensed products to fans of sports teams in Europe and Asia.

Google is Losing to the "Evil Unicorns"

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Unicorns are not always good. Just ask Google.

Google is Losing to the Evil “Unicorns”

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The latest web manipulators are causing greater havoc by targeting Google’s real-time news and video results. The company is overhauling its video search, limiting results around news events on YouTube to verified outlets and placing more algorithmic emphasis on these sources more broadly.

Snapchat Has a Child-Porn Problem

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Snapchat parent Snap Inc. says it uses both staffers and automated systems to protect children—and all 178 million users—from unwanted messages, but it would not provide details. Snapchat has been singled out by investigators as a danger due to pedophiles who used it to exploit teens for sexual gratification. It's a popular app among young people, and its disappearing messages make evidence tougher to find.

Snapchat Has a Child-Porn Problem

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Social networks continue to be venues for pedophiles. Who is responsible?

Apple Has Big Plans for Your Little Screen

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple will spend $1 billion next year on programming for television. By sticking with mainstream shows, it could miss out on viewers who increasingly favor edgier fare.

Another Pipeline of Russian Influence

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

When campaigning through steel country, Donald Trump promised to bring back jobs to the American steel industry. He also indicated that "we're going to be make pipeline in the United States" with American steel. However, tariffs or trade restrictions on "cheap" foreign steel have not been forthcoming, and a big winner in some recent pipeline contracts is a Russian steel company with close family ties to the Trump family.

The U.S. Lags China in Spotting Cyberthreats

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Hackers have a head start in exploiting system flaws. The Equifax hack is an object lesson in the need for U.S. security watchdogs to receive more money and pick up the pace.

The Kids Who Rule Toyland

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

YouTube is the most influential social media platform for 72 percent of young Generation Z consumers. That has helped it become a big venue for toy reviews sponsored by brands. Kids have captivated their peers on social media with videos of toy unboxings and reviews.

Twitter Isn't Taking Fake News Seriously

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Twitter's headquarters sees "Ban Russian Bots" on its building. What's going on?

A Different Way to Cut Kids from the Squad

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Sports recruiting may be changing. It may not just be based on skills and physical ability anymore.

The Equifax Job

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Investigations into the massive breach aren't complete, but the intruders used techniques that have been linked to nation-state hackers in the past. There are significant ramifications of the stolen financial data—Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and more—of at least 143 million Americans.

You May Hug the Screen

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Visits to prisons are changing. Friends and relatives may now be using video viewing.

Captain Ahab Doesn't Live Here Anymore

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

While self-driven cars have garnered the headlines, they are not the only profitable niche for this type of piloting. Ships are also capable of being driven technologically. Companies such as Sea Machines Robotics are perfecting their products to autopilot large vessels from dock to dock. Rolls-Royce and BHP Billiton are working on designing ships that would not require human navigation.

America’s Relationship with Mark Zuckerberg is ‘It’s Complicated’

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Facebook has 2 billion users, record profits, vast influence, and big problems in Washington. While on paternity leave, Facebook’s CEO has been unable to avoid what’s become a second full-time job: managing an escalating series of political crises.

Your Next Phone Will Probably Cost $1,000

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The smartphone makers and carriers are going to greater lengths to disguise the rising costs of their phones, which are about to cross a big psychological threshold. Apple’s next iPhone and the latest Samsung Note approach four figures.

Piecing Together a Credit Fraud

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fraudsters are finding it harder to get away with using fake plastic. Scammers are constructing fake people to get real credit cards.

Workers of Silicon Valley Unite!

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Silicon Valley companies are a tale of two workers. Tech company employees enjoy good wages and benefits. Many service workers on the tech company campuses, however, are employed by contractors and receive much lower wages and fewer benefits. By focusing attention on the well-known tech companies, labor unions are successfully organizing contract workers.

Your Next Phone Will Probably Cost $1,000

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Your new smartphone could cost you more than $1,000. Will you line up to get one?

Snapchat vs. the 'Influencers'

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Social media advertising can be profitable for some video producers. Snapchat doesn't but into it though.

The Fresh Scent of Success

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Unilever manufactures and markets consumer products worldwide, with brand names that are well-known to consumers everywhere. Under CEO Paul Polman, it has also taken steps to emphasize corporate social responsibility and concern for the environment. Recognizing that underdeveloped areas of the world are an important growth opportunity, Unilever works to educate consumers on proper hygiene while building brand recognition.

You Are Here (So Buy Something)

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Foursquare may have faded, but it's back. And now the app is split in two.

Making Opioid Addiction Searchable

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Privacy vs. healthcare. How do we deal with the abuse of opioids?

Guess Who’s Ghostwriting Monsanto’s Safety Reviews

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Monsanto has a public image problem: It's the poster child for concerns about GMO crops. Now it faces a threat from research that has prompted the WHO and California to label its blockbuster product Roundup a human carcinogen. The revelation that Monsanto employees were involved in reviewing and editing the “independent” research purporting to show that Roundup is safe does not help the company's case.

Dropbox Gets Ready for the Road

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Dropbox becomes less complicated. It's moving away from what doesn't bring in paying customers.

The Hatchet Men And the Hot Dog

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Brazil's 3G Capital has grown by buying well-known consumer product companies and cutting costs. It typically makes deep cuts to expenses, including closing factories, laying off workers, and getting rid of expensive perks. To grow, it also looks to grow market share in countries where the brands are less well known.

Using Animals to Predict the Future

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Animals might be the key to predicting natural disasters. Can it really work?

A New Sports Authority

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

This is a site for sports fans. No news here.

China's Elusive Goal: A Global Apparel Brand

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Gao Dekang grew Bosideng from a small factory with eleven workers to a global apparel powerhouse and the largest maker of down coats in China. As a manufacturer, Bosideng makes coats for many well known brands, including Adidas, North Face, and Columbia Sportswear. Domestically in China, Bosideng has a strong brand, but it has had difficulty taking its brand global.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Carlos Ghosn has assembled an alliance of auto manufacturers that has a global reach. He successfully turned around the struggling French auto company Renault, and later was successful with Nissan. The alliance now includes Mitsubishi, AvtoVaz, and Dongfeng.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As chairman and CEO of a global alliance of auto companies, Carlos Ghosn has had success with helping struggling companies become more profitable. He believes in cutting marginal operations so that he can invest in the more profitable ones and help them thrive. He is an advocate of globalization.

Love in the Time of Mass Incarceration

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Prisoners may lose their online dating privileges. Is this good or bad?

New Lloyd, Same Goldman

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Lloyd Blankfein has been chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs for more than eleven years and seen the company through the financial crisis of the last decade. He also just went through a medical crisis of his own, completing 600 hours of chemotherapy to treat lymphoma. He recently opened a Twitter account and used his first tweet to criticize President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. He is positioning Goldman Sachs to profit from an improving worldwide economy.

Uber Without the Smartphone

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Uber is not just for the young. Senior are finding a way to use the service without a smartphone.

Paid In Semi Full

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There is an indisputable gender pay gap in the United States, but the source of this pay gap and what could or should be done about it remain open questions. Personal decisions may explain some of the observed pay differences, but companies that have examined their compensation have found inequities that can’t be explained this way. Some companies have been working to address this issue for decades, while other companies are resisting calls to simply provide data.

CNN Has Had Enough

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Media companies are getting sick of Facebook. News outlets are complaining about Facebook's terms for TV-quality videos meant to compete with YouTube.

Google Execs Hunker Down for Fight With EU as Fines Loom

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The EU has a big decision to make. Will Google suffer the largest antitrust fine in history?

Apple's New iPhones May Miss Out on Higher-Speed Data Links

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The iPhone may not be number one, at least not in data speed. It's all a matter of components.

Putting Home Sales Ahead of Paperwork

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Real estate companies are using cloud computing to save time and money when buying and selling homes. Agents are spending less time scheduling and more time selling. Innovative ideas and processes using cloud computing are enhancing real estate sales and marketing.

Here Comes the Space Cleanup Crew

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

What goes up must come down. We are all aware of the old adage, and it has sparked concern for people as we launch more and more items into space that remain in close orbit. Now, the desirable orbits have become more cluttered, and the risk to very expensive new technology launched into orbit is becoming an issue. Technology is now addressing this as innovators have begun to invent cleanup satellites to remove space junk.

A Spotlight on Harassment at Google

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google allegedly has some harassment problems. The "Yes, at Google" publication can tell you all about them.

The Talking Cat and the Peroxide Corporation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Chinese manufacturing and industrial companies, looking for growth opportunities but facing slower growth in China, are looking at foreign opportunities. One example is the recent purchase of Slovenian app maker Outfit7 by Zhejiang Jinke Peroxide Co. for $1 billion. With clearly no operational synergies, this is simply an example of foreign direct investment for financial reasons.

Augmenting Snap’s Financial Reality

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Snapchat is piloting ads built into pricey custom Lenses. It says a third of Snapchat users play with Lenses and geofilters daily. It remains to be seen whether the Lenses are effective or Facebook-proof.

Augmenting Snap's Financial Reality

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There is now more to Snapchat: advertising.

Satellite Pics for Cheap!!

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Satellites aren't just for governments. They now have a commercial market.

Seriously, Beware the 'Shadow Brokers'

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Hacking goes public. Your computer could be under someone else's control.

Wall Street’s New Favorite Way to Swap Secrets Is Against the Rules

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Encrypted messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal are raising concerns about widespread abuse by traders at big banks. The apps are an easy and virtually untraceable way to circumvent compliance, get around the HR police and keep bosses in the dark. A deeper concern is that the apps could enable reckless and illegal behavior that's all but impossible to police.

The Smartest Machines Are Playing Games

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Artificial intelligence is being used for gaming. Can the results help solve real world problems?

Training Day

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

KentuckianaWorks trains young adults and displaced blue-collar workers with sought-after advanced manufacturing skills. Its success illustrates the relationship between human resource management, education, and training. It also illustrates the shared needs of workers, employers, and society.

Now on EBay: Russian Micro-Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Small firms are using EBay to reach markets across borders. In Europe, sellers can now sign up to have items listed in multiple countries and have the descriptions translated into local languages. For EBay, more than half the company's revenue now comes from international markets.

A Mouse (Maker) Roars at the Industry Giants

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Logitech isn't just a mouse company anymore. It's moving into your home.

How Much Is an Instagram Story Worth?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Travel and tourism are being advertised and marketed using Instagram. Two brothers have been very successful.

AI Speed-Reading for the Masses

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

AI technology can do more than recognize cats in YouTube videos. It's now used to power Echo and Tesla's self-driving cars.

"Hollywood"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The U.S. and Chinese film industries have become increasingly interdependent, with big U.S. studios counting on Chinese financing and ticket sales. Last year the Chinese market generated 19 percent of global box office sales and had higher revenues than U.S. theaters for some films. In addition, Chinese firms have made major investments in U.S. movie theaters and film studios.

Survival of the Fitted

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

E-commerce companies are tapping data for clothes and other goods. Old-school retail rivals want them, too. In the U.S., French Connection is tweaking its clothing based on feedback supplied by mail-order styling services.

Startup Types Build Ready-Made Activitism

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Techies are getting more political with a range of websites that walk visitors through, among other things, complaints to Congress. A series of quickly-made websites provide shortcuts to constituent calls and other forms of civic engagement.

The Bot That Bluffed Me

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A computer beat top poker players. Is this the first of many wins for the computer?

When a Facebook Page Matters to Facebook

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Mark Zuckerberg’s image in the digital domain needs to be controlled. There are more than a dozen Facebook employees writing Mark Zuckerberg’s posts or scouring the comments for spammers and trolls.

In Brazil, It's Now Beer—Without the Babes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Brazil is an important market in the worldwide beer industry, and this is the season for summertime beer ads. Compared to other years, however, the ads are a little more tame and less sexy. While this may be partly related to changing advertising norms, it also reflects the increasing importance of women as customers.

From Angry Birds to Particle Physics

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Learn physics with a video game. Will it really teach your kids anything?

TFW Your Country’s Shredding Money and You Own a Payment App

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fintech upstart Paytm is leveraging an anti-corruption campaign to establish itself as India's dominant digital payments player. It wants to be India's first $100 billion company by value.

When Bad Things Happen to Good Funds

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Interestingly, a strong long-term mutual fund performance record is not enough to hold on to investors. A long-term shift from active to passive funds affects even managers with outstanding records.

When a Startup Means a Fresh Start

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Defy Ventures is giving parolees a second chance. It seems to be working.

Baby's First Virtual Assistant

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Aristotle, help the baby go back to sleep. Help for parents is on the way.

Everybody Must Get Streamed

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Startup Livestream is selling preachers, wannabe stars, and ExxonMobil on tools to improve their online video broadcasts. It buys display ads on websites that just show a customer’s stream, a service it calls “audience booster.”

Code School's Out

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

If you’re thinking of going to a coding boot camp, think again. You may not get what you’re expecting.

Where a Graying Herd Still Thunders

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Regulatory changes and technological advances have led to major reductions in the number of trading and investment banking jobs; the biggest global firms have shed almost 10,000 of these jobs in the past five years. Experienced brokers and traders have lost their jobs, and many have struggled to find job opportunities in finance. TJM Institutional Services, however, has taken advantage of the flood of talent on the job market and is growing its business by finding a way to monetize the experience of these industry veterans.

Breitbart Advertisers Take Political Fire, Too

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A growing list of advertisers have decided to pull advertising from Breitbart's website, arguing that its publication of anti-immigrant, anti-women, and anti-muslim articles is inconsistent with their company values. In response to Kellogg's decision to pull its ads, Breitbart responded by asking its readers to boycott Kellogg's products. But since many companies use advertising agencies and third-party Internet placement firms to distribute their ads, it can be hard for advertisers to control where their ads show up.

The New Advertising As Seen on TV

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Video ads on Facebook are here. The company is testing you.

Microsoft Isn't Feeling Any Russian Thaw

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As a matter of national security, Russia is trying to develop more home-grown software and applications. It is also requiring that Russian consumers' data be stored on servers in Russia. For U.S. technology-based firms such as Google and Microsoft, not only can this mean lost revenue, it also contributes to the development of new competitors.

Time For Some Traffic Problems on Netflix?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The future of net neutrality is up in the air. It could take years for changes though.

Instagram Tries to Ease Users Into Shopping

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Instagram is testing whether letting brands tag photos with links will succeed where other social media marketing has failed. It is part of its broader strategy for helping people pick out and buy things.

Hey Guys, Watch This

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Hawkers, a Spanish sunglasses brand, has become a Facebook and Twitter case study. It illustrates that you do not need lots of money to spread the word. Saldum Ventures, the parent company of Hawkers, has sold 3.5 million pairs of sunglasses in three years with guerrilla marketing and heavy promotion on social media.

In Case of Low Revenue

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Twitter's "Firehose" of a half billion tweets a day is incredibly valuable — and just as dangerous. Find out how despots use Twitter to hunt dissidents.

Making VR Matter

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There's more virtual reality to come. Will apps become cooler now?

Will Not-Quite-Fiber Make the Grade?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

BT Group is opting out of fiber optics. The company sees copper in its future.

How Adidas Got Back in the Game

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Adidas's stock price is seeing a nice rise as the company picks up market share and sponsorship agreements. Part of the rise is fueled by a greater emphasis on fashion, including limited edition shoes. Adidas is also working with music entertainers to have them "design" shoes for the company.

The Browns Know a Lot About Their Fans

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The tables have turned. A football team is now watching you.

Samsung's Recall Is Official, Now It's Time to Rebuild Trust

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Now that Samsung Electronics Co.'s recall of the explosion-prone Galaxy Note 7 smartphone is official in the United States, the company can start focusing on the tough job of restoring public trust.

Snooze

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

An Olympics TV ratings slip among viewers age 18-34 is raising questions about NBC’s ability to profit from the games long term. One reason: Sports fans are getting older.

Virtual Assistants Need Assistance

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Virtual assistants are here. They have hearing problems, though.

A Watchful Lock Aimed at the Masses

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Delivery personnel can be given access to your front door. Latch's digital lock makes it possible.

Mark Weinberger, CEO EY

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

EY, the accounting and consulting firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, hires around 60,000 people a year. Many of those are young millennials, who have different expectations than previous generations. A key requirement is more flexibility in time, which leads to different ways of organizing the work of individuals and teams.

80,000 Hours of Local News Courtesy of the 2016 Election

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Local TV news viewership is falling, but broadcasters are adding hours anyway to chase campaign ad revenue. Not all campaign consultants are sold on the idea that more local news is better.

Tweaking the Sales Pitch for Drones

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The drone market continues to grow. DJI already owns half the U.S. market but is looking to expand.

Facebook Gave 1.65 Billion Users a Streaming Service Then This Happened

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Facebook now has Facebook Live. Users will be able to stream live video.

Courts Deal a Setback to Unions and Obama

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A U.S. district judge’s recently issued injunction highlights challenges in determining the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with mandated disclosures. The injunction blocked implementation of a new Department of Labor regulation that would require companies to disclose payments for more types of anti-unionization consulting services. While unions argued that the regulation would increase transparency and “level the playing field,” the judge decided that the expanded scope of disclosures could adversely affect the availability of legal advice regarding responses to union-organizing campaigns.

Someone Owns This Data

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There's a fight for fingerprint ownership. The courts are now involved.

Settling Legal Conflicts, EBay-Style

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online tools are available for settling legal disputes. Negotiations take place for such things as divorces, child custody, and landlord-tenant disagreements.

Now the Boss Can Monitor Your Phone

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can companies now monitor your personal phone at work? It's happening in Russia.

It's Gonna Get Ugly: Clinton, Trump Poised To Go Negative In Campaign Ad Wars

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The presumptive Democratic nominee had it easy in the primary, but that’s about to change. Democrats hope that the absence of negative ads from Sanders in the primaries will put Clinton in a better position to face Trump.

Algorithms Aren't Just for Coders

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Economists are moving into the private sector. Companies want them for their tech skills.

Building a Better Mouse Cage

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

It's time to take humans out of the mice labs. Vium, a Silicon Valley startup, wants to automate the process.

Disney's New Cultural Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In preparation for its Shanghai Disneyland theme park, Disney began working with arts institutes in China to build awareness and interest in performing at the park. Part of the challenge was to develop talented performers who could sing in the style of Disney show tunes, such as those in The Lion King. Another part of the challenge was to better understand how Disney productions could be modified to be more interesting to Chinese audiences. In a separate program, Disney launched English language training programs aimed at children two through twelve, with a curriculum that uses Disney characters.

You Can’t Find the Cat Faster than Nervve

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

NBA jerseys are getting a new look. Advertisements may now become part of the uniform.

High Hopes for Satellites

Thomas Coe  |  Communication

NASA isn’t launching many satellites, but commercial launches are expected to increase in the next few years. Satellite launches generate billions for the industry, but most of the revenues come from services that provide communications such as TV, cellular calls, and Wi-Fi connectivity.

Digital Payoffs for Volunteer EMTs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Trek Medics is training volunteer medical technicians and providing free phone plans to bring rural emergency services to countries where such offerings are rare. Trek has been able to build a volunteer network of about 200 people with a shoestring budget.

An Encryption Fight At Your Fingertips

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Phones with fingerprint encryption have been sold since 2013. This feature allows police to get into your phone.

A Much Closer Look at Nap Time

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You can watch your kids at daycare and preschool now. Yes, there's an app for that.

Who's Alexa?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Amazon.com's Echo is not your typical touch screen device. It is a voice-controlled smart speaker.

At T-Mobile, It's Union vs. Sort-of-Union

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

An effort by the Communications Workers of America (CWA) to unionize T-Mobile has so far resulted in two union contracts that cover 30 workers. T-Mobile claims that its internal T-Voice system of engagement with employees helps management understand issues that are important to employees. The CWA, however, contends this is a union-busting tactic that was outlawed in the 1930s.

Keeping It In the Family

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Founding a business and developing its brand is a lifetime task for many entrepreneurs. Letting go and passing it on to family is sometimes a far more difficult task.

A Paperless Air Traffic System Has Many Fans

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Canada no longer uses paper strips for air traffic control. The country's new computer system comes from a nonprofit corporation.

A Chance to See Spot Sequenced

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

What is the ancestry of your dog? Embark Veterinary wants to help you find out.

Google's Cloud Chief Aims Higher

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google is trying to revive its cloud. It was first on the scene but is now struggling.

Google Kicks Its Car Fight Upstairs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are you ready for driverless cars? It could come down to state versus federal government.

Europe Bets on Robots to Help Care for Seniors

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Robots may be able to help the elderly, and Europe is testing the idea. By one estimate, 32,500 robots designed to help care for the elderly and disabled will be sold from 2015 through 2018.

Amazon's Story Time Is Kind of a Bummer

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Amazon has a plan for loss-prevention. As an employee, you are shown stories of coworkers fired for company theft.

Sprint's Plan to Mortgage Its Airwaves

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Sprint is facing $34 billion in debt. They plan to borrow from a subsidiary that they will create.

Someone Didn't Get the Memo

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How would you like a "backdoor" installed within your cell phone that could potentially allow the government to access its data? Well, you may not get a choice.

The Last (of This) Unicorn?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Zenefits is under investigation. Did their sales people complete their required training or not?

If You Are Anti Are you Anti?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Until January 2014, Walmart rejected applications for spousal health benefits from employees who were legally married to same-sex spouses. By arguing that denying coverage to her same-sex spouse is a form of sex discrimination, an employee’s suit to recover costs incurred after Walmart denied her application for spousal health benefits has the potential to expand the scope of sex discrimination.

The Female Solidarity, Have-It-All, Feel-Good Machine

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Women's empowerment conferences are booming. While this trend may reflect a growing interest in the empowerment of women, it remains uncertain if the conferences are helping women advance their careers or if the demand may actually reflect the need for more change.

Samsung’s Emerging Market Is . . . Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

While Samsung holds around 20 percent worldwide market share in smartphones, it has just 6 percent of the smartphone market in Japan. As it expanded worldwide, Samsung chose to focus on other emerging markets and largely left the Japanese market to local competitors. In fact, other than Apple, foreign phone makers have had difficulty entering the Japanese market.

The Phone Companies People Actually Love

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There are options if you don't like your cellular phone carrier. Mobile virtual networks are beginning to gain market share.

E-Mail Spam Goes Artisanal

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You may start getting more spam e-mails now because spammers have found new ways for getting around the filters.

Why Doesn't Silicon Valley Hire Black Coders?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Although African Americans comprise about 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for only about 1 percent of the technical employees at most Silicon Valley companies. There are multiple explanations behind this statistic, with many companies taking steps to try and boost employment of African Americans.

Chowing Down on Boomers' Brains

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As more baby boomers inch towards retirement, companies are taking steps to facilitate knowledge transfer to the millennial generation. While millennials may have analytical skills and knowledge of data, boomers have expertise that can help fill the gaps. Programs that pair younger workers with more senior coaches and mentors are one way companies are trying to capture more knowledge from boomers before they retire.

A Pixie to Keep an Eye on Your Keys

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Have you ever misplaced your keys? Help is now available and more sophisticated than ever.

Who's Who and Who's Not at the WEF

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The theme for this year’s Davos conference is Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution—referring to the impact of technologies like artificial intelligence and robotics. But the guest list and discussion topics seem more focused on geopolitical concerns about China, the Middle East, and Russia.

Facebook's Fight to Be Free

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Facebook is trying to expand Internet access. Online access is an issue in India.

Spotify Isn't Laughing Off This Lawsuit

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Musicians are suing Spotify for failing to fully pay for songs that it streams. Some of the suits are seeking class-action status.

Spotify Isn't Laughing Off This Lawsuit

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online music streaming is being challenged. One lawsuit claims that Spotify is utilizing unlicensed streams.

The Sustainable Locally Sourced Free-Range Humanely Raised Made-to-Order Toxic Burrito

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

At what price has Chipotle focused on providing “food with integrity?” After three different pathogens have caused five outbreaks and sickened hundreds of Chipotle customers across the United States, Chipotle is shifting its focus to food safety. This shift, however, means a departure from many established organizational routines and practices.

Texting Out an SOS

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

WhatsApp is being used to help women trapped in human trafficking. Women are being given information to help them escape.

Opening a Nationwide Mobile Wallet

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Peruvian banks are trying to get money moving through cell phones. The mobile payment system, Bim, was launched on Dec. 15.

How 'The Big Short' Hollywood-ized the Financial Collapse

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Communication

The Big Short, a new movie with an A-list cast, tries to explain some of the financial crisis’s complicated transactions. But have any of the problems leading to the financial crisis really been fixed?

Watch Out, JPMorgan! This Guy Wants to Kill Banks

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Four-year-old nonbank lender Social Finance is out to kill banks. CEO Mike Cagney is betting that by making millennials feel as if they belong to an exclusive club, he can turn an entire generation into lifelong customers. So far he has lent $6 billion to SoFi's "members" while avoiding federal regulations.

Profiting From Poor Africans

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

M-Kopa, a Kenyan company in the solar power business, plans to be a $1 billion firm by selling solar panels to rural residents -- and providing them with credit. M-Kopa's typical customer lives on less than $2 per day, but is willing to purchase a $200 power system in order to save money on kerosene and electricity.

Apps That Fight Your Parking Tickets

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There may be a new way to get out of your traffic ticket without paying the high cost associated with typical legal fees. A variety of new apps can now help you get legal assistance at an affordable price.

A Tiny Speed Bump for Streaming’s Advance

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

British singer Adele and Sony Music Entertainment are betting fans will show up at record stores and on iTunes to buy a copy rather than stream it on Apple Music and Spotify. The initial sales data suggests they are right. There are questions if this phenomenon will slow the growth of streaming services.

SoftBank's $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Masayoshi Son, Chief Executive Officer of SoftBank, hired Nikesh Arora from Google to help the company invest $3 billion per year in promising startups with high end potential. Unlike most pools like this, they are not using a shotgun approach with the money, rather they are going to focus huge amounts of cash on around 10 startups. This Bloomberg Businessweek article gives personal insight into Arora and his frame of mind as well as his philosophies on risk.

Voting From the Privacy of Your Couch

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Some countries are trying to decrease electoral fraud. A new software company, Scytl can be used for online voting and tallying and claims it can help stop electoral fraud.

Slapping a 'Natural' Label on Everything

Eric Cardella  |  Communication

As consumers demand food that is less processed and more natural, food companies race to revamp their products and tout them on the label as being "natural" and "authentic." Are these claims legitimate or just a marketing ploy to increase sales?

Slapping a ‘Natural’ Label On Everything

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

As companies reformulate products and label them to evoke a sense of natural authenticity, terms such as “local,” “humanely raised,” and “authentic” are largely left to the interpretation of food marketers. The conclusion is that consumers are left to figure it out for themselves. But do we know what we are eating?

The Netflix Effect is Spreading

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Digital video continues to be a growing market. Some are calling the phenomenon the "Netflix effect."

Beefed Up

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

According to drug manufacturer Elanco, the world’s growing demand for meat, milk, and eggs is a more urgent priority than American consumers’ desire for food that is organic, antibiotic free, or pasture-raised. Elanco's answer is the use of antibiotics and growth hormones to increase food production. But is it safe?

Fraudvergnügen

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Legislation in the United States has encouraged automakers to explore new technologies to reduce vehicle emissions and increase fuel economy. While some automakers have turned to hybrid and electric vehicles, Volkswagen chose to invest in what it termed clean diesel technology. In many ways, this was simply building on Volkswagon's strengths and investments in diesel engines, but when the technology couldn't quite get the company to the point it desired, a few lines of code were used to trick the emissions tests.

Google Books' Win May Threaten Other Media

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google can legally scan books for online viewing, according to a recent ruling by the Second Circuit. The effects of the ruling could spread to other forms of media.

The Perils of Being a Value Investor

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Longleaf Partners' $4.3 billion value fund beat the stock market for two decades, but this year the value formula has resulted in a 24 percent loss. Veteran managers insist their investments will eventually pay off.

Smartphone Margins

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Apple’s utter dominance of the money-making end of the smartphone industry leaves many Android makers scrambling to create less expensive phones. Are the margins for these low-cost smartphones sufficient to support this strategy?

One Company Tries Life Without (Much) E-Mail

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Atos, a global IT-services firm, is trying to sell companies on its e-mail-minimizing social network -- which it says is a major timesaver.

Long Live the King

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Burger King is relying more heavily on data to make sure its marketing is cost-effective as it reaches customers through digital and social media. Franchisees say the resulting buzz has translated into higher restaurant sales, and the company is doing it for about one fourth of what McDonald’s spends on advertising.

Credit and Debit Cards Lag on Upgrades

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The deadline to have all credit and debit cards chip-equipped has passed. Many cards still use magnetic strips that aren't as secure.

How Much of Your Audience Is Fake?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

How do you know real people are viewing your online ads? An increasing number of digital ad viewers are not human; they're ad bots. These bots are skewing data and the results that online advertisers report. Some consider it nothing less than advertising fraud.

Uber Tells Judges to Read the Fine Print

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Uber claims drivers are independent contractors and not entitled to benefits. However, U.S. district court judge Edward Chen granted class-action status to two Ubers drivers asking reclassification as employees.

Netflix Wants an Oscar On Its Mantle

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Netflix continues to reshape the movie business and the release of “Beasts of No Nation” gives the company a chance to win its first Academy Award. The goal is clear: to increase its 65 million-plus worldwide subscribers.

If You Blocked This Ad, We Wouldn't Get Paid

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Ad-blocking appears to be on the rise. How will advertisers respond?

REITs May Not be the Answer for Retailers

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Activist investors are pressuring retailers and restaurant chains to spin off their property into real estate investment trusts in order to boost stock prices and unlock cash.

Elon Musk May Not Make the Best Neighbor

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Texas state officials wooed the SpaceX company with $20 million in incentives to set up shop in Boca Chica. However, residents of this South Texas town are not happy with the firm's proposed rules, which include forcing residents to evacuate their homes on launch days.

A Push to Regulate Alternative Medicines

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The FDA allows makers of homeopathic products to make claims unsupported by medical evidence, unlike other drug producers. However, consumer complaints of homeopathic products are leading to a possible increase in FDA scrutiny.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Eros is one of Bollywood's largest studios, releasing around 70 movies a year. Hoping to attain a first-mover advantage in advance of foreign rivals such as Amazon and Netflix, Eros is launching a video streaming service.

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Forget about streaming video or downloading or uploading large files if you live in Cuba. With fewer than 4 percent of homes having access to the Internet, Cuba has some of the worst Internet access in the world. How does Castro’s government respond to the market demand for better Internet access and control access to information?

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Not everyone has access to the Internet. Fewer than 4 percent of homes in Cuba have online access.

Making Qatar's Skies Friendlier for Employees

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

While policies on marriage and pregnancy have recently been relaxed, Qatar Airways' flight attendants still must abide by some rules that are consistent with local middle eastern culture but different from the rules of many international airlines. Qatar Airways pays well by industry standards and provides free housing to its employees. With the company planning to hire another 6,000 flight attendants over the next two years, it's making some changes to its policies while also trying to make sure applicants know what is expected in a conservative middle-eastern culture.

Moving From Dot-Com to Not-Com

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The .com web addresses have caused some security problems. Companies are buying top-level domains to help fight scammers.

HBO, Netflix, and Amazon Want Your Kids

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Sesame Street has become a new front in the streaming wars. To become more indispensable, HBO, Netflix, and Amazon are expanding their collections of kids' shows.

How Google Lost Europe

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google's search engine is very popular in Europe, as is the Android operating system. European opinion leaders have heaped praise on the company for its stance on free speech and human rights. But Google also has its critics and detractors who believe the company has used its dominant position in the search market to push its own services at the expense of other websites. The search engine giant is now facing increasing criticism in Europe and potential fines for its business practices.

Diebold’s New Executive Suite

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

When Diebold CEO Andy Mattes assembled his management team at Diebold, he decided it didn't really matter where people lived and didn't expect them to move to Canton, Ohio, where Diebold is headquartered. Thus, various senior managers live in cities across the country and have regular conference calls. Since many executives spend much of their time traveling anyway, Mattes decided it was more important to hire the best people rather than the best people willing to move to Canton.

A Technology That Reveals Your Feelings

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Your emotions can be electronically tracked, and your facial expressions are being analyzed for consumer marketing.

Networks Outsource Their Networking

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Streaming video is causing challenges for TV networks, which in the past relied on cable or satellite providers. Further, the outsourcing of streaming-service development has become a business worth $527 million a year.

Big Data: Searching for Drug Side Effects

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Millions of people search online for information about symptoms and prescription drugs. Patterns in their searches might reveal previously unknown side effects of medications.

Fiat Positions Maserati to Replace Ferrari

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Ferrari, Fiat’s top luxury brand, is being spun off. Fiat is planning to fill the vacuum of the iconic Ferrari brand with Maserati. One of the challenges for Maserati is finding a way to broaden its appeal without chipping away at exclusivity.

Coders Balk at Making Apps Searchable

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Only a few thousand mobile apps -- out of several million -- have links that enable their content to be searched, as coders are resistant to use deep links in apps. However, Google and Facebook claim the links create more traffic to the apps.

The SEIU’s Odd Recipe for Unionizing Fast Food

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Communication

McDonald’s uses its franchising system to deflect charges that it pays workers too little. But the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is going after them anyway to get fast-food workers organized and get them higher pay.

How Do You Type an "A"?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You may know how your computer works, but do you know how your keyboard works?

LG's Slim Screens Get Slimmer

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is thinner better even if it's more expensive?

Some Falafel Shops Go Better With Coca-Cola

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Coke offers small restaurants in Germany access to an app that will facilitate online ordering of food and beverages.

Snapchat’s Long Game

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Snapchat SEO Evan Spiegel says he has a better way for advertisers to reach millennials and teens than TV or social networks.

Your 'Likes' May Mark You as a Victim

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Data miners are scouring Facebook and public records to look for plaintiffs for suits against drugmakers.

Testing Workers' Digital Privacy Protections

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A lawsuit argues that employee-monitoring apps go too far.

Shareholders Revolt Against Dark Money

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Should utilities disclose contributions to nonprofit advocacy groups, including groups that oppose the development of alternative energy?

Rivals Are Gaining On YouTube

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

YouTube holds the lead in the $7.8 billion U.S. market for online video ads, but the chase is on. Multiple rivals are attempting to steal market share from the online video giant. Will the giant fall?

Twitter Tries to Tone Down the Chirping

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Twitter’s new Highlights feature will simplify the experience as it pushes the service toward a Facebook-like experience in an effort to boost flagging user growth. Is this a step forward or a strategic blunder?

P&G Stops Making Sense

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Will major reductions in Procter & Gamble's product line make it more competitive?

Big Pharma’s Patent Wars

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The legal battles continue on “product hopping” by pharmaceutical companies.

Drone Makers Seek Traffic Control

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Will we soon be sharing air space with drones?

Snapchat TV

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can we really watch TV on Snapchat?

A Little Black Book with 1.6 Billion Numbers

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Internet shoved aside the Yellow Pages. A Swedish startup aims to do the same regarding the White Pages.

Vanguard and Schwab Turn to Robo-Advising

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Investing’s old guard gets its algorithm on.

Coke’s Unlikely Savior

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

U.S. cola consumption is falling by about 4 percent a year. Soda makers are seeking new sweeteners to reverse the trend.

A Little Black Book with 1.6 Billion Numbers

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Reinventing the White Pages with an online twist.

Unforbidden Fruit

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

After fortunes have been made, the push to stop deforestation in the palm oil industry has moved other big companies to follow suit. Is this a legitimate campaign or a sustainability stunt?

Paying by the Second, Instead of the Click

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You can resume your game after the advertisement is complete.

Making Washington Fall in Love With Pizza Again

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Communication

The $37 billion pizza industry wants Congress to roll back regulations designed to get Americans to eat fewer slices.

JPMorgan Won't Show Its Work

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

JPMorgan’s calculations of its mutual fund family’s performance are hard to re-create.

Replacing Class-Action Postcards With "Likes"

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Ex-interns suing Gawker want to use social media to find plaintiffs.

The Hunt for China’s Real Growth Numbers

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Economists using a “Li Index” find GDP growth is 5 percent.

America Roams Far Behind Europe

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

U.S. carriers aren't following foreign companies' fee cuts.

On Payday Loans, Churches Ask, "WWJD?"

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Alabama churches are lobbying for tighter regulation of local payday lenders.

Too Good to be Legal

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In a year, Popcorn Time has become the Internet's pirate service of choice, despite the MPAA's best efforts.

The NBA’s Hoop Dream: World Domination

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

About 300 million Chinese play basketball, and the NBA hopes to use that fan base to someday eclipse soccer’s popularity. With that dream be realized?

The Case of the Stubbed Hub

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Do consumers really want to know the price they're paying?

Making the Internet’s Onion More Appetizing

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Facebook and other big companies are moving into the most secret area of the Internet.

Watch Your Mobile Wallet

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fraudulent smartphone payments are becoming a pricey problem.

"Fifty Shades" Protest Force Twinings to Abandon Racy Promotion

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

The British tea company Twinings has bowed to pressure from activists and customers and pulled a promotion linked to the R-rated movie “Fifty Shades of Grey.” Meanwhile, the box office prepares for a blockbuster success.

Uber and Google Move Toward a Breakup

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can Uber beat Google in the ride-sharing wars?

Why Brands Love China's Sex And The City

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Western brands vie for product placement on China's hit shows, and often don't even have to pay for the publicity.

Why Brands Love China’s Sex And The City

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

The Tiny Times movies have pulled in $208 million at the box office, making them attractive for promoting luxury brands to an affluent and young Chinese market.

Hop In and Shove Over

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are Uber and Lyft finally carpooling?

China's Streaming Fans Face a Long Wait

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How will China's new censorship policy affect video sites?

Fighting U.S. Extradition at All Costs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can the U.S. successfully prosecute Russian hackers?

007’s Next Mission: Saving Aston Martin

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Aston Martin’s annual sales fell by 45 percent to only 3,600 cars sold annually between 2007 and 2012. The company is now looking to James Bond to save its legendary brand. Can 007 do it?

Amazon Sorts Itself Out for the Holidays

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Amazon.com tries to prevent shipping delays during the holiday season.

Biogen Straps Fitbits Onto MS Patients’ Wrists

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Data from MS sufferers could help Biogen prove the value of its medications to insurers and pharmacy benefit managers.

Janet Yellen Is in No Hurry to Raise Rates

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Fed’s favorite measure of inflation has risen at an annual rate of just 1.3 percent, well below its target of 2 percent.

The Sharing Economy: Monetize Your Life

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

We are all entrepreneurs at varying levels.

Uber Alles

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Though Uber keeps expanding, not all cities are welcoming the car service app with open arms.

Kiss Your Cords Goodbye

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Keyssa is trying to bring a new level of wireless transfer speed to consumer phones, laptops, and home appliances.

The Extremely Metered Paywall

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Is there hope for the struggling newspaper industry? Article-selling startup Blendle reports 129,000 users in six months with growth expectations ahead.

Square Finds Itself Encircled

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How many card reader companies will survive?

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Samsung is losing ground to a wave of Chinese and local smartphone upstarts in India, where it has led for years.

All You Need to Know About Net Neutrality

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

New regulations coming as soon as December could determine whether the Internet continues to treat all traffic equally.

Datsun's Second Life Isn't So Good, After All

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Resurrected in emerging markets, Datsun's cars are viewed as too cheap.

Fracking's Funny Numbers

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In a review of drillers’ data, the resources touted to investors average 6.6 times higher than those reported to the SEC.

Adidas's World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Adidas's sales in the United States are down 14 percent this year due to weak sales in basketball and golf.

Back by Popular Demand … Surge Soda

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

The power of a dedicated fan leveraging the power of social media pushed Coke to re-introduce Surge.

Appmakers Try to Game a Crowded Market

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Appmakers that paid about 40¢ per download five years ago in marketing costs now spend $2 to $50.

Drizly Lets You Point, Click, and Drink

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Bring me another bottle of vodka. I live at ______________.

Drizly Lets You Point, Click, and Drink

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Will that be delivery or pick up for your beer, liquor, or wine?

Apple's First Responders

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

When Apple unveils its new iPhone, its early field failure analysis team will be ready to quickly diagnose any problems.

The Teaching App at the Head of the Class

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Remind, an educational-messaging tool, is among the hottest apps in Apple’s App Store.

Why Apple’s iBeacon Hasn’t Taken Off—Yet

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Apple’s year-old indoor-tracking technology hasn't broken out from its pack of rivals.

The Teaching App at the Head of the Class

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Remind pushes smartphone messages to students and parents.

Business Tries to Crush San Diego's Pay Hike

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Communication

San Diego businesses are launching a referendum campaign to reverse the city’s new higher minimum wage.

The Cookies You Can't Crumble

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google, Facebook, and other startups are finding new ways to collect data for advertisers.

Turning Ethiopia Into China's China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Labor costs in Ethiopia are approximately 10 percent of those in China, causing some Chinese companies to shift production to Africa.

Tech Giants Struggle to Break into Cars

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

It's not just thieves who want to break into your cars.

You Know You Want Him

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

How does a first-generation American move into the role of becoming a highly sought after spokesperson and a business-empire builder? Rapper Pitbull does it one partnership at a time.

Flipkart's Fight to Maintain Its Lead in India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Delivering in a city with no street address system. Can it be done?

Your Hospital Knows Your Secrets

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Some hospitals are reviewing consumer data and purchasing habits to help predict which patients will need care.

Think Old.

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Volvo owner Zhejiang Geely is investing $11 billion to revive Volvo’s popularity, especially in the U.S. where sales fell 55 percent in the past decade.

Eritrea's Communications Disconnect

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Given Eritrea’s minimal phone and Internet access, it’s hard to draw attention to its economic and political problems.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

Will World Cup Sponsors Get Kicked, Too?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Coca-Cola has invested $4 billion this year on marketing as Brazil’s 2014 World Cup, the biggest soccer party on the planet, is now plagued with protests. What will Coke do if things go as badly, as some predict?

Crash-Proofing The Future of Drones

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How do we avoid drone crashes? There's no clear answer yet, but they're coming anyway.

Modesty is the New Abercrombie

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Abercrombie & Fitch is hoping to bring back teens who are leaving the mall. Is there still time to save the brand?

Can Pinterest Be Found in Translation?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Pinterest is trying to gain members outside of the U.S., but must adapt to cultural and social differences.

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Nike is making a big push to catch Adidas in the soccer gear market.

Choosing Profits Over Productivity

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Company’s aren’t spending enough on the equipment workers need.

Searching the Web for Drug Side Effects

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

What can social media posts tell us about prescription drugs?

Selling a Brand, Shot by Shot

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

A shot in the dark? Fireball Cinnamon Whisky has become one of the most successful liquor brands in decades, with annual sales now exceeding $80 million.

Selling Ethical Fashion to the Whole Foods Set

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Last year, more than 1,100 workers died in the collapse of a Bangladeshi clothing factory. A handful of startup online retailers are taking action by selling direct and offering ethically manufactured, higher-quality products.

Aereo's Survival Depends on Semantics

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Supreme Court's decision about online streaming could cause the end of a company.

I’ll Pass

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Convertibles, long a symbol of fun and freedom, are going the way of the Model T.

Can Amazon Find Room by the TV?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Just when you thought online buying couldn't get any more convenient, Amazon has stepped into the living-room turf war with its streaming Fire TV. But acquiring market share is not going to be easy.

Can Amazon Find Room by the TV?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Amazon wants time in your living room.

Good for Kids, Good for Publishers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

First Book Marketplace accounted for 2 percent of all juvenile books sold in the United States last year to an unlikely audience at a surprising price. Why is everyone involved winning?

The Epic Hack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Target's security monitors in India noticed the malware on its U.S. servers almost immediately, but the red flags were ignored.

Big Mickey Is Watching

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Mickey is tracking your every move. Disney is betting a billion dollars that RFID wristbands will create a better experience. Will it work?

Pinterest For Your Secrets

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

I've got a Secret. I'll Whisper it to you.

Born-in-the-USA Luxury Gains in China

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

China now accounts for more 25 percent of global luxury spending for U.S. brands, and U.S. sales are growing faster in China than pricier European luxury lines.

The LIfe and Times of a Sirlion Steak

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Meatpackers are suing to block a federal rule requiring Country of Origin Labeling on beef sold in the U.S.

House Calls Without the Home Visits

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Investors are putting money into telehealth services used to treat common ailments.

Why Is This Man Smiling?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Do you want your cable company to be bigger and have more control over what you watch and how you get online access? Comcast does, and it's spent more than $75 billion in acquisitions to make that happen.

A Museum Trades Memberships for Data

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

What can you get for free at the Dallas Museum of Art?

Yes, You Can Find a Babysitter Online

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

People will date someone they meet online, but will they hire babysitters they meet online?

A Deal Divides Denmark

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Denmark's sale of 18 percent of state-controlled Dong Energy to Goldman Sachs is raising a furor.

Bringing Order to Data Chaos

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fast-growing data center software companies are expanding their services in search of profitability.

Land of the Falling Wage

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Communication

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe is pushing companies to raise wages in an attempt to finally rid Japan of its deflation.

We're So Sorry

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The responses of university officials seem almost as irresponsible as the failures underlying the academic scandals involving the University of North Carolina's athletic programs. To some extent, attitudes seem to be changing.

Sony Bets That Jazz Can Still Be Hip

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Sony has revived a record label for jazz, a genre that sold 14 million albums in 2007 but only 5 million albums in 2013. Is the jazz audience still willing to pay to listen?

Japan Tries to Alter the Market's DNA

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Communication

Compared with their U.S. and European counterparts, Japanese CEOs are less focused on shareholder returns. The country's prime minister Shinzō Abe's new JPX-Nikkei Index 400 is an attempt to boost growth by spotlighting companies that focus more on financial performance.

Lenovo Takes on Apple and Samsung

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can Lenovo compete with Samsung and Apple?

Not Another Music Streaming Service!

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Is the digital music market saturated? Beats says its brand cachet will give it an edge in the chase for 29 million streaming music subscribers worldwide.

How Imgur Became a Photo-Sharing Hit

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How many photo-sharing sites can consumers tolerate?

Luxury Car Makers Bet on Lower-Priced Rides

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Are you looking for a Chevy or a BMW? The three major German auto manufacturers are introducing luxury sedans at lower prices than some mainstream U.S. cars.

My Fridge is Smarter Than Yours

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Samsung has captured worldwide market share in appliances, with the goal of being No. 1.

Snapchat for the Corner Office

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Shredding is out; self-destruct messages are in.

The Biggest, Cheapest Network of All

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Why ignore the biggest communication network in the world? The fastest and largest network is the one we have all been building together, router by router. It's changing the face of the wireless industry.

The Biggest, Cheapest Network of All

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Costly conventional cell networks can be largely replicated by existing Wi-Fi infrastructure.

Superbugs: From Farm to Table?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The FDA's new rules regulating antibiotic use in farm animals look a lot like the voluntary program at McDonald's. Why are many corporate forces opposed to stronger regulation?

Chinese Students Major in Luxury Cars

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Communication

The number of Chinese students enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities has more than tripled in the last decade, and many spend big bucks on cars while they are stateside.

GrubHub Puts Data on its Menu

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are restaurants willing to give commissions of more than 20 percent of their total food orders to a data company?

Just Order the Tree Online, Charlie Brown

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Would you like to cut down your Christmas tree or just click to get it? Online Christmas tree sales are booming worldwide.

A "Kill Switch" on Samsung Phones is DOA

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Don't wireless phone carriers want to stop smartphone theft? Maybe not.

The Rise and Fall of Blackberry: An Oral History

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Some believe that the BlackBerry brand has value and that people want to see it succeed. Reality may make a very different decision as the company continues to burn through cash with no end in sight.

Keeping a Close Eye on Amazon's Discounts

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Camelcamelcamel's data and graphs help steer price-conscious Amazon shoppers to discounts that can top 30 percent.

A Plague That's Carried on Mobile Devices

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Kill as many people as you can with your infectious disease.

Trying to Build the Next Amazon—in Nigeria

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online retailing and delivery has to adapt to Nigerian's skepticism and roadway realities.

Fast Food is Getting Lighter, Slowly

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fast food companies are working together to find ways to make their food healthier.

Forget Your Wallet

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

As smartphone usage continues to increase, mobile payment transactions are expected to take a 38 percent jump to $325 billion in 2014.

Etsy's Identity Crisis

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can Etsy still claim to be “your place to buy and sell all things handmade”?

In China, Dell Clings Tightly to the Waning PC

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Dell is pursing retail sales, and opening up stores, to build market share in China.

How Citibank Bought a City Cheap

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Even alternative banking activists are using Citi Bikes. Is Citibank's sponsorship of New York City's bike share program changing the company's image?

Electrolux's Holy Trinity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

To move up market, Electrolux is changing how it develops new products.

Saving Elephants with Google Earth

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Drones are helping keep Kenyan elephants away from poachers. They can’t help with Kenya’s booming population.

Apple's Got You

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Apple is quietly seeding its mobile devices with iBeacon, which provides impressive location-based tracking. Why is the company being so quiet about this new technology?

Hiring in the Age of Big Data

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online questionnaires and games allow hiring managers to compare applicants with their star employees.

Rural Banks Know Something Big Banks Don't

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Communication

Although the total number of banks in the United States has declined 50% since 1980, "the middle of nowhere" still needs a bank.

Smut With A Smile

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Promoting the mantra “Keep Calm and Chive On,” TheChive.com is a tacky little frat-boy-like site –- with an annual revenue stream approaching $100 million.

A British Invasion Without the Mop Tops

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

British television producers look to global markets, including the United States, when developing new television shows.

SIM-Card Hackers Have a Few Questions for You

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Carriers around the world will suffer an estimated $3.6 billion in losses from fraudulent account takeovers.

The Big Bucks in Keeping Kids Focused

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Although two thirds of all ADHD drugs are sold in the United States, drug makers are trying to get the attention of doctors and regulators in Europe.

Your Facebook Data Are Here

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

By freely sharing innovations implemented in its Swedish data center, Facebook is conserving resources and helping to revolutionize the data center industry.

A Brooklyn Beer With a Swedish Accent

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Brooklyn Brewery, through an arrangement with Denmark's Carlsberg Brewing, has tapped the Swedish market for high-priced beer.

Roku Feels the Heat From Apple and Google

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Roku vs. Apple: the battle for streaming video.

A Star-Powered Factory Opens in Haiti

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

IRII is using celebrity backing to bring change to Haiti's apparel industry and the lives of its workers.

China Turns the Screws on Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Chinese government is going after more foreign multinationals for violations of Chinese laws.

Robosigning's Erin Brockovich

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Could you lose your home to a robosigner?

A Culture Clash in the Yogurt Aisle

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

A no-fat, high protein food fight: Danone’s Oikos aggressive brand campaign has slowed the growth of its competitor and market leader Chobani in the $7.6 billion Greek-style yogurt U.S. market.

The Boomer Car Boom

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Consumers aged 55 to 64 are far more likely to buy a new car than drivers under 34. Automakers have taken notice.

Apple Sets Off a Biometrics Arms Race

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Biometrics companies are benefiting from a potential iPhone fingerprint scanner.

Old Looks On New Screens

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Mobile apps are a powerful component of marketing strategy. Mobile users may soon make up half of ModCloth's visitors, spending more per purchase than other customers.

What If Fast-Food Jobs Really Paid $15 an Hour?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are the wages paid to fast-food restaurant workers an ethical issue?

Your Not-So-Secret Medical History

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You had surgery last year and now everyone knows about it.

SAP Invades Silicon Valley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In order to capture market share in cloud computing, Germany's SAP is making acquisitions in California.

The Viral Media Site That Optimizes Optimism

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

With a goal of promoting meaningful stories, Upworthy reconsiders the nature of viral content.

Seeking a Phone for the End of the Desktop Era

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Canonical’s founder Mark Shuttleworth has crowdfunded millions of dollars to develop a super-superphone: a single device with phone and tablet capabilities that mimics all the functions of a PC. Will the numbers work?

The Viral Media Site That Optimizes Optimism

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Let's optimize presentation and see what happens.

Recalculating Navigation Needs

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

How do you compete with free? Car navigation manufacturers are struggling to compete with free smartphone-based systems that offer real-time data.

Recalculating Navigation Needs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can built-in navigation systems compete with smartphones?

Hummus: The Great American Dip?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Makers of hummus are modifying traditional recipes to suit American tastes. Will it be the next salsa?

This Is What Success Looks Like

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 on the San Francisco Airport runway may look bad, but the low number of casualties is a testament to improvements in airplane safety, a culture of learning from accidents, and the effectiveness of shared responsibility for safety.

Crowdsourcing Your Grocery Bags

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Using the fulfillment software as its secret sauce to combine orders placed at different times and fill them from different stores, an Amazon veteran is trying to take his online grocery startup, Instacart, national with $8 million from Sequoia Capital.

Things Aren’t So Fab at Fab.com

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Communication

What sort of company is Fab.com, and why do they seem to be losing executives?

McFresh

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Can the McWrap bring back the 18- to 32-year-olds who want fresher, healthier offerings? No longer on the millenial generation's top 10 list of favorite restaurant chains, McDonald’s launches the new “Subway buster” product for that demographic.

ATMs That Look Like iPads

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Banks are investing in new ATMs for the first time in years, adding features that work like tablet and smartphone apps.

H&M’s New Love For Old Clothes

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Communication

Europe's No. 2 fashion apparel chain will now give you a discount if you bring in your old castoff garments.

H&M’s New Love For Old Clothes

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

H&M's new program offers discounts to customers who bring in used clothing. Sustainable genius or greenwashing?

Can E-mail Be Prism-Proofed?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Do you really think your e-mail is private?

This Prism Isn't Reflecting Much Light

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In the wake of Edward Snowden's leaked information about NSA programs, U.S. technology companies are struggling to protect their reputations with users.

This Prism Isn't Reflecting Much Light

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How much privacy do we actually have? We still don't know.

Using Social Media to Stop Fraud

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online payment companies and credit bureaus are trying to use information social media users voluntarily share to verify identities, detect true financial positions, and help reduce online fraud.

Can Coach Keep Walking to the Bank?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Ralph Lauren did it. Can Coach? As Coach’s North American market share slips to 30 percent, the company hopes to leverage the luxury brand into other fashion categories. But why shoes?

Promise, This Won’t Hurt a Bit

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Startup MC10 miniaturizes medical diagnostic devices and has enlisted big-name partners in the medical and sports world.

Rise of the Alpha Dads

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In the U.S., working dads say they want more time with their children -- more so than moms.

Ferrari Bets That Less is More

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Ferrari plans to reduce production in 2013 in an effort to grow sales.

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

Android is Everywhere

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Android versus Apple - is it even a competition anymore?

There Can Be Only One

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Microsoft dominates console wars and now it wants the rest of your family’s TV time.

There Can Be Only One

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Xbox isn't just for gamers anymore.

Where's the Colonel When You Need Him?

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Communication

At its Chinese restaurants, KFC’s “finger lickin’ good” eats offer more local dishes, such as chili black fungus and fishball soup, undermining its American identity.

Crowdsourcing an End to Sweatshops

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Systems based on anonymous employee phone calls may be able to help Western companies monitor and improve working conditions in factories across the globe.

Facebook Struggles to Find its Footing

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Facebook scrambles to make money from mobile. Does it have a plan to make it profitable?

The City that Runs on Sensors

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can sensors really help us with traffic congestion?

The Perils of Price-Matching

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Implementation vagaries may be causing a consumer backlash to Wal-Mart’s national price-matching promotions.

Usain Bolt: The App

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can the garage developer survive the branded app?

Some CEOs Are More Equal Than Others

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The SEC has yet to develop regulations for implementing the CEO-to-worker pay ratio disclosure mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act.

Mobile Games with Megaprofits

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

With a dedicated user base regularly spending big money, mobile gamemaker Supercell turned a 58 percent operating margin last quarter.

Your Phone Knows What You're Watching

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

TV networks are investing in an app that keeps viewers subsidizing the TV ad model even while glancing down at their phone.

Israel's Big Bank Backlash

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Average citizens expressed outrage on Facebook and pressured Israel's second largest bank into withdrawing a sweetheart deal.

Turning Shoppers Into Heat Maps

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

We're now being tracked offline as well.

Silicon Valley Goes Hollywood

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Recruiters and headhunters are playing matchmaker/agent for freelance programmers by having an A-list of software engineers on speed dial for clients who need coders fast and now. The startups turn to 10X Management for pick-up programming whenever they need it.

A Comic Book Makes the Case for Loews

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Communication

Why did Loews decide to explain the corporation through the use of a comic book? What have critics thought about the results?

The Escape Artist

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How did Rupert Murdoch and his company's stock price survive a potentially career-limiting phone-hacking scandal?

LinkedIn is Trying to Quicken its Pulse

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Visit more, stay longer. LinkedIn doesn't mind if you do.

Stocking the Shelves With a Green Solution

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Lack of information creates opportunity for Green Depot’s environmentally friendly building products.

Can Foursquare Check-In to Adulthood?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Have you heard of Foursquare? If not, you're not alone.

Who's Complaining About Your Bank

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can a public database of consumer complaints improve banks' customer service?

Think Colossal

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Samsung is now the top seller of smartphones, the number one manufacturer of LCD televisions, the seller of more flash memory and RAM chips than any other company, and passed Nokia to become the world’s largest mobile phone manufacturer. What next?

China's Journey from Imitator to Innovator

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You make the call. Are China's Internet companies imitators or innovators?

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

M.A.C. cosmetics finds sales opportunities for its high-end products in ethnic areas and emerging markets.

The SEC's Road Map for Pursuing JPMorgan

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A Senate investigation provides evidence that the SEC and other regulators can use to prosecute JPMorgan and its executives.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Estee Lauder is using its M.A.C. cosmetics line, a hit with ethnic consumers at home, to enter emerging markets.

Grooming Advice From a Virtual Stylist

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A speech-recognition pioneer’s latest startup hopes to build conversation simulators that almost any business can use.

Streaming With a Little Help from Your Friends

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Netflix's latest innovation is to allow their 33 million online subscribers to view and comment on videos seen by their Facebook friends. Is this a promotional dream come true?

How Apple's iWatch Can Be a Moneymaker

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Can Apple design something else that consumers didn’t even know they needed: a smart wristwatch? Apple needs a boost, and the company hopes it's time for the smartwatch to give them a hand.

How Apple's iWatch Can Be a Moneymaker

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple sells a lot of electronics, but can it sell the iWatch?

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Pepsi is investing in healthy (and not so healthy) foods in the former USSR, while adapting products to local tastes.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

PepsiCo sells $5 billion worth of products a year in Russia and is using the market as a staging ground for expansion into Eastern Europe. And it's not just about selling Pepsi anymore.

Computing that Makes you Feel

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Computers may have feelings after all.

Will Carnival Party On?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

After a series of mishaps and related public relations disasters, will Carnival's reputation and stock price be able to rebound after the Triumph debacle?

Mattel’s Mom Issue: They Really Don’t Get Hot Wheels

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Why doesn’t mom know how to play with Hot Wheels? Mattel sells $1 billion in Hot Wheels annually, and with that number is shrinking, the company wants to find the answer.

A Portrait of a Chinese Hacker

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Corporations like Dell employ malware experts to protect corporate economic interests, but society also benefits.

Nascar Brings Back ‘Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday’

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Nascar may become the new auto showroom. The big change? What you see on the track may be at a car dealer near you.

Do You Really Want To Talk to Your Kitchen?

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Communication

“The Jetsons” are here. The smart home-automation envisioned in the show's scenarios are finally possible. SmartThings wants to make household devices talk to each other.

Do You Really Want to Talk to Your Kitchen?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is the automated home the next great technology?

Mobile Apps, Now for Immobile Devices

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is the battery dead on your phone? Switch to your PC and continue the fun.

Snapchat and the Right to be Forgotten

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Snapchat allows users to share photos while keeping better control of their own cyber personas.

Hacked? Who Ya Gonna Call?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Could your firm be the target of a high-end cyber-espionage operation?

Battered in China, Japan Inc. Seeks Refuge

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Japanese auto companies are finding Thailand more friendly than China.

Mobile Apps, Now for Immobile Devices

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

BlueStacks’ App Player software could mean that mobile apps can be used on any device or operating system. A gamer’s dream come true -- and more.

The Future of Browsers Isn't What it Used to Be

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Web browsers’ looks and functions are changing as companies such as Microsoft and Google tie them into their operating systems.

The Lies We Tell at Work

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Why is there so much lying at the office?

How a Turkish Immigrant Made a Billion Dollars in Eight Years Selling Yogurt

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Hamdi Ulukaya, a Turkish immigrant, is an billion dollar American success story. Chobani’s payroll has almost doubled in the past year with plants in Idaho and Australia, and more growth is on the horizon. Can the yogurt be that good?

The Bigger the Brand Is, the Smaller It Should Act

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

J.Crew needed to reposition their brand with men, and the retailer took an unusual approach. It decided smaller is better.

These Days, Anybody Can Headhunt

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Communication

Can operations managers save money by conducting their own recruiting?

The Dangling Man

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Investigators work to untangle a web of relationships and shared information underlying illegal insider trading at hedge funds.

Inside Big Pharma's Fight Against the $75 Billion Counterfeit Drug Business

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Pharmaceutical companies that compete in the marketplace cooperate to fight counterfeit drugs.

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

This Theater is Getting Awfully Crowded

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is there room for another online streaming service?

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

Unilever: Taking on the World, One Stall at a Time

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Communication

By emphasizing market share and having brands across many price points, Unilever is expanding in emerging markets.

China’s Smartphone Market Welcomes Dumbphones

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

China is now the world’s largest smartphone market and home to Lenovo, the world’s biggest PC vendor. In 2013, Lenovo is working to get every phone sale possible. Look out Apple?

Pandora is Boxed in by High Royalty Fees

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Growth can be expensive. Competition is tough for Pandora Media, which pays more than 50 percent of its revenue toward royalty payments for artists, while its rivals pay far less. Will the equation change?

Lincoln Wants to Torch the Airport Limo

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

More commonly seen parked at nursing homes rather than night clubs, the Lincoln luxury line is getting a $1 billion branding revamp, courof tesy Ford Motors. Can the luxury line's image really change?

Thursday Night Football Scores Big for the NFL

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Is Thursday the new football night? The NFL receives $1.1 billion annually from its NFL Network on pay TV as it reserves Thursday night games for its own channel.

The Pirate-Infested Waters of App Retailing

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Tech pirates have now turned their attention to apps.

The War Over Christmas

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Communication

Brick-and-mortar retailers are applying valuable lessons acquired from their online competitors this holiday season. Look out, Amazon.

Finding a Haystack's Most Influential Needles

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Startups Tellagence and Little Bird are challenging Klout by identifying the social media influencers most likely to affect their clients’ sales.

The Automated iPhone Pawn Shop

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You can make money on your broken electronics while helping with recycling efforts.

Uniting the Muslim World, One Cat Photo at a Time

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can core Muslim values be upheld on a social networking site?

Microsoft's Frantic Race for Third Place

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is there room for Microsoft in the smartphone market?

Flipboard Plays Cupid to Sell Digital Ads

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can Flipboard survive with its unusual advertising model?

The Facebook Freakout

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Do investors see anything right with Facebook?

Crowdfunded Searches for Medical Miracles

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A new nonprofit uses social media to help fight rare diseases.

Chasing Facebook's Next Billion Users

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Where will Facebook find its next billion users?

Profiting From Other People's Wi-Fi

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

We don't all pay for smartphone activity.

Big Brands Move to Little Screens

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Big-brand advertisers are looking for big returns on small investments.

Why Johnny Can't Friend Facebook

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is there a legitimate place for preteens in the world of social networking?

In Video Chat Reboot, Flashers Need Not Apply

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Will we ever get enough of online relationships?

Greetings, You've Just Been Likejacked

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Social media is the new forum for spammers, and the sites are taking action to combat the problem.

The Other Cult in Hollywood

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple products were in more than 40 percent of top movies last year, an advantage as traditional advertising falls flat.

Must See YouTube

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are Hollywood stars coming to YouTube?

Google Sees the Future, and It's in Kansas City

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google Fiber. Will the Internet giant really consider moving into high-speed Internet?

Coming Soon to Your Desktop at Work: Ads

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Goodbye, business software fees. Hello, advertisements.

Game Makers Place Their Bets

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Move over Vegas, World of Warcraft wants your business.

Anarchy in the App Store

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are app rankings legitimate or just a ruse to get into Apple's storefront?

'To My Son, I Leave a Level 80 Paladin'

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As if there's not enough to fight over, let's add digital assets to the mix.

Let There be Light. Sometimes

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Are we now losing control to our window shades?

The Perpetual Love Machine

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The online dating site wants to keep users involved after they've found love.

A Souped-Up Engine for Gamers on the Go

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Step aside gaming consoles. Cloud gaming is moving in.

The Drug War in Mexico, Now on the Blogosphere

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

With the press cowed by gang reprisals, blog posts and tweets fill an information void.

Goggle, Twitterr, Faecbook

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Have you paid a visit to Goggle, Twitterr, or Faecbook?

Gasoline Cars Get a Mileage Jump-Start

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Do you want to improve your gas mileage by 5%?

How Salesforce Tames Twitter for Big Business

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

We can Chatter about more social media, but we'll be monitored.

A Startup Tries to Turn the Page

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Interactive digital textbooks come to Facebook!

You've Got Mail ... and It's from India's PM

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Use your free e-mail account, even for official government business.

For Wireless Giants, Reception May Get Spotty

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can cellular companies keep their customers coming back for more data, or will they lose out to the competition?

The DJ in the Next Cubicle

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

You can now be a music DJ right from your own home or office, no experience required.

Coin of the Geeks

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Put your cash and credit cards away - only bitcoins are accepted here.

How Apple Feeds Its Army of App Makers

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Software developers say a big hello to Apple.

Clawing Sales-Tax Revenue Out of Amazon

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Is it the end of no sales tax for Amazon shoppers?

Digital Music May Get Convenient Real Soon

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Get your music from the cloud, Apple's iCloud.

Like Having a Venereal Disease That's in Remission

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Domination of the speech-recognition technology is a strong-armed tactics approach.

The Company That Kicked the Hornet's Nest

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can we really stop the hackers or do we have to simply find a way to co-exist?

EA's Plan to Get you to Play Everywhere

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Electronic Arts is coming to a digital device near you.

Trouble at the Virtual Water Cooler

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The virtual water cooler invades the workplace: social networking for employees only.

Fighting For TV Survival

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A format fight between Samsung and LG is the most recent setback for the new TV technology.

IPad Causes Collateral Damage in Taiwan

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Taiwanese tablet market takes a hit. Can it recover?

The YouTube of China Goes Legit

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The repairing of China's Youku means no more illegal downloading.

A Fight for the Right to Remain Anonymous

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As Facebook requires new members to use their real names, Web icon Christopher Poole, known for his anti-Facebook message forum 4chan.org, makes waves at SXSW with a plea for anonymity.

Is DoubleClick Clicking for Google?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Some question the acquisition that gave Google a display ad business.

Coming Soon to Your Screen: T-Commerce

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Shop with just a few clicks of your TV remote.

Getting Social Media Games to Play Overseas

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

With help from startups like Mentez, social gaming companies are trying to exploit growth opportunities abroad with localized experiences.

Mobile Wars!

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Who will win the platform war and achieve mobile dominance?

Who You Calling a Data Hog?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Mobile carriers call them data hogs.

Is WikiLeaks Hacking for Secrets?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Internet security company Tiversa claims that WikiLeaks may be searching hard drives to get information.

How do you Make Money Answering Questions?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fresh off its IPO, Demand Media is blanketing the Web with answers to millions of questions.

Creating Web Addicts for $10,000 a Month

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A new breed of consultants, working for the likes of NBC and Playboy, promises to boost business by adding game elements to humdrum sites.

How to Kinect with Hackers

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Microsoft has succeeded despite itself in creating something really cool. But by hampering the relationship with Kinect-loving hackers, Microsoft could squander a once-in-a-generation opportunity.

Google's Search for a Digital Wallet

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google is working on a payments service for smartphones using near-field communication technology.

Handicapping the Clash over iPhone Service

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Verizon is poised to muscle in on AT&T's lucrative Apple deal.

2010 in Review

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Capitalism lives off of change, according to this commentary.

OMG! It's a Text From Granny

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As growth in voice revenue slows, telecommunications carriers are pushing data services such as texting. Wireless operators see opportunity in older demographics because relatively few send texts.

Will Video Kill the Internet, Too?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Internet traffic is expected to triple by 2014. By then, more than 90 percent of the traffic may be video.

So Google's Buying Your Startup. Now What?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google is trying to persuade startups to sell their businesses to the technology giant. But hotter rivals like Facebook are making deals of their own. Google is having to work hard to win firms over.

Dear E-Mail: Die Already. Love, Facebook

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The social network is trying to change the messaging game with its new service.

Rise of the Orange Machines

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Kiva's warehouse robots are enabling e-commerce companies such as Quidsi to handle more product at lower costs.

Mobile Apps Suit Up for the Office

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

By 2015 about half of all devices on U.S. corporate networks will be mobile. The shift away from PCs means a large increase in the North American market for office apps.

A Fresh Coat of Paint for MySpace

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Deep in the red, News Corp.'s social-networking site gets a redesign. The cool factor is still to be determined.

Being Steve’s Boss

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Confessions of the last man to manage the singular inventor.

Diaper vs. Goliath

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Diapers.com is just five years old and is already breaking even in a category that wasn't supposed to work on the Internet: quickly shipping bulky, low-margin commodities.

RIM's PlayBook Runs Onto a Crowded Field

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The company says its iPad competitor is tailored for business.

Don't Be Evil (or Commit Tortious Interference)

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In a lawsuit, Skyhook Wireless seeks tens of millions of dollars from Google for intentional interference that scared Motorola away from a big contract

'Good Morning, This Is Your Coffeemaker Calling'

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Verizon introduces its vision of a future full of wirelessly connected autos, refrigerators, MRI machines, and countless other devices.

Fantasy Football: The New Internet Porn

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Fantasy football has become, for better or worse, an Internet addiction for a generation of upwardly mobile, white-collar professionals

Intel Wants to Be Inside Everything

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Intel is counting on its Atom embedded processors to help break its dependence on the slowing PC market.

Salesforce.com Channels Facebook

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Salesforce.com launches a real-time collaboration cloud

Data Mining Helps Hospitals Pry Fees from Patients

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Billing software companies are helping hospitals identify patients with enough assets to cover their bills but who may need help figuring out to do it.

Nokia's iPhone Envy—and Comeback Plan

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Nokia, once considered the BMW of mobile phones, is now described by an analyst as a Ford, reliable, not expensive.

Did Activision Just Frag Itself?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

This article describes the battle between Activision Blizzard (the large gaming studio) and two game developers, Vince Zampella and Jason West.

Retire-But in the Game

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Retirees with professional backgrounds like scientists and engineers are signing up with YourEncore.com, a Web-based service that connects these retirees with companies that need their expertise.

Stealing Your Identity for Liposuction

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Crooks are using pilfered data to charge health care

Night of the Living Dead Brands

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Most people assume a brand is dead when stores stop selling it. However, the company Imation, the world's largest seller of recordable compact discs, has spent the last couple of years reincarnating Memorex as a line of consumer electronics and are bring back another predigital company, TDK, as a high-end line of stereo gear.

The Last Picture Show at Blockbuster?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

With time running out for the video-rental empire, CEO Jim Keyes desperately needs Hollywood to help him remake the company so it can avoid Chapter 11.

Brownnosing for Google Broadband

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

If American Internet service gets faster, people will likely spend more time online watching videos and playing games, providing Google fresh ways to expand its advertising business

Yelp: Advertise or Else?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Yelp, the online business review and advertising site, is being forced to deal with its own unanticipated criticism. A federal lawsuit was filed in California on behalf of some small businesses claiming that Yelp routinely highlights negative customer reviews unless business owners agree to advertise with the company.

With Dell in the Dust, Acer Chases HP

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Acer has focused on consumer sales as businesses have slashed tech spending. But it is expected that a brighter economic outlook and the launch of Windows 7 will cause a rebound in business orders this year.

Korean Tech Is Losing Its Cool

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How Korea, a onetime digital trendsetter, became a laggard in an era of smartphones

Google's New Billion-Dollar Baby

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Revenues from Google's display advertising business are expected to rise as much as 40% this year, to slightly more than $1 billion.

AT&T's iMess

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The iPhone has swamped AT&T's data network and sparked a consumer rebellion. What can Ma Bell do?

Why Apple May Dump Google

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple is considering replacing Google with Microsoft's Bing as the default search engine on its iPhone.

Yahoo Opens its Checkbook

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Yahoo is interested in purchasing companies that bring the Web portal more users

Five Ways the 'iPad' May Change the World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The iPad is on the way, and it just might reduce calling costs, cut your commute, and, to the delight of journalists everywhere, pull print media back from the brink.

All iWant for Christmas...

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

While everybody was paying attention to the iPhone, iPod touch sales rose by more than 100% in the final quarter of 2009.

I Want My. . .Vevo?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The famously fractured music industry bands together to launch an ad-driven music video Web site.

Beware Social Media Snake Oil

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The rising popularity of Facebook, Twitter, and other social media Web sites presents an opportunity for companies to reach millions of people.

Murdoch vs. Google

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Rupert Murdoch may make a deal with Microsoft to make Bing the only search engine to deliver News Corp. content

Why Drugmakers Don't Twitter

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The FDA has so far failed to craft rules clarifying how pharmaceutical companies can participate in online discussions.

The Great Android Invasion

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google is not only coming out with new mobile apps but extending the system's use to other devices.

Elder Care by Remote

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A cost-effective home-health system for the elderly is being tested.

Verizon Mobilizes Against the iPhone

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Though it doesn't have the hottest smartphone on the market, Verizon is introducing new products and backing them with an unusually aggressive marketing campaign.

What's Holding Back Tech

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The surprise surge in demand for PCs and handsets has the industry scrambling to get the supply chain humming.

Dell's Do-Over

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Michael Dell is trying to change almost everything about the computer company he founded.

The Second Coming of Iridium

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Satellite phone provider Iridium Communications is coming back from bankruptcy, sparking hope for the broader satellite industry, long burdened by high startup costs and slow demand.

Can Google Stay on Top of the Web

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google has many engineers and executives that don

Tech: The Return of Risk-Taking

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Many corporations put off technology investments during the downturn and are preparing to step up spending to generate the productivity gains that they need to influence their bottom lines.

Apps Trump Tunes at Apple

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Music is less crucial as iPod sales ease and the company focuses on software.

Oracle has Customers Over a Barrel

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Oracle already wields tremendous power in the technology industry, and that will only grow if the proposed acquisition of Sun goes through. If the deal happens, Oracle will possess one of the widest ranges of products for corporations in the industry.

Will Windows 7 Reboot PC Sales?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Why the boost to the tech business from Microsoft's new operating system may disappoint the bulls.

Microsoft Research Keeps Dreaming big

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Microsoft's research and development organization, MSR, claims it has made important contributions to new products. However, Microsoft is under financial pressure and recently reported its first annual decline in revenues since going public in 1986.

Microsoft: Take That, Google

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Microsoft has just announced a deal to team up with Yahoo to increase its market share in the lucrative Internet search market.

'Motorola Has One Bullet Left in Its Gun'

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

New phones equipped with Google's Android operating system may come to market too late to save Motorola's mobile-phone business.

Google's Battle for the Office

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google just announced that it is creating an operating system to compete with Microsoft's Windows, so it seems that it is determined to take market share from Microsoft's core software businesses.

Building a Social Network That Pays

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Intuit directs power users of QuickBooks to a site where they can exchange helpful information with other users. For customers, that means quicker answers to problems. For the company, this volunteer army means less need for paid technicians.

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Mobile-phone chipmaker Qualcomm and startup Zeebo are introducing an inexpensive gaming console that will focus on what marketers dub the next billion. These consumers live in developing nations, have rising incomes and modest savings, and together spend $1 trillion annually.

TiVo Wants to Be the Google of Television

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

How can TiVo become the Google of TV? By helping viewers search for programs and by selling ads and ratings data to advertisers. A still-potent brand name and 140 patents should help.

Smartphone Roulette

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The number of operating systems running sophisticated smartphones that can run advanced software is exploding. For the hundreds of software developers that create applications for the corporate market, this abundance of choice is a double-edged sword.

Why We Tweet

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Columnists Jack and Suzy Welch used Twitter and the social media to help launch a new book. They describe tweeting as good for old-fashioned marketing purposes.

Microsoft's Search Savior?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In unveiling a new Internet search engine called Bing, Microsoft hopes to create a loyal base of fans who routinely use Bing to make complex decisions rather than defaulting to Google.

Managing the Tweets

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Companies are scrambling to silence errant messages while exploiting social networks.

Cisco Seizes the Moment

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Cisco CEO John T. Chambers believes the company can capitalize on opportunities to expand during the recession.

Real Disease, Virtual Help

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Public-health officials have been turning to computer scientists for aid in fighting a variety of infectious diseases.

Clouds on SAP's Horizon

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

SAP, the slow-moving software giant, needs to perform better and become more nimble if it hopes to withstand global economic shocks and changes in the software industry.

The Dubious Promise of Digital Medicine

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The federal stimulus program enacted in February gives hospitals the opportunity to receive several million dollars each for tech purchases over the next five years. In addition, individual physicians can receive up to $44,000 for these same types of purchases. This money is supposed to encourage the proliferation of technology that will computerize physician orders, automate dispensing of drugs, and digitally store patient records.

Tech: Lean and Ready to Spring

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The recent thriftiness and insistence on lean inventories could keep tech companies well-positioned when the economy starts to heal.

Twitter Makes a Racket. But Revenues?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The social network is being coy about its intentions. Monetizing its search engine could end up being one.

The Online TV Threat has Cable Scrambling

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Steve B. Burke, the president and chief operating officer of Comcast, America's largest cable distributor, is worried about the rush of consumers going to online movie and video sites.

An All-Out Online Assault on the iPhone

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A number of companies are setting up their own versions of Apple's red-hot App Store.

Tech Spending: The Great Divide

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Technology companies are being affected differently by the economy based on what types of products or services they sell. In the current environment, most companies don't have the ability to incur capital expenses or have the credit available to borrow money from lenders to pay for traditional hardware and software purchases. So, a great divide is opening up in the tech industry for companies that sell to businesses.

Internet TV Just got a lot Closer

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Will the Internet ultimately replace cable television?

The Next Net

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A nascent industry involving the likes of Google and Nokia is pinpointing the movements and behaviors of millions of cell-phone users.

The Squeeze on Online Ads

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

While online advertising from the big companies like Yahoo and the New York Times are suffering, business is increasing for advertising networks. These companies primarily serve as brokers between advertisers and Web publishers. They connect sites that want to sell ad space with advertisers and agencies that want to reach potential customers.

Windows and Intel's Digital Divide

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A legendary partnership is strained by the rise of mobile and Web computing, and the companies' own outside ventures.

WiMAX: The Signal Flickers

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Clearwire needs to raise billions in capital to continue expanding.

A Field Day for Cyber-Fiends

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The combination of a weak economy and a widespread banking crisis is creating opportunities for online criminals to steal valuable financial information from individuals.

The Real Potential of Apple's iPhone

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple has an early lead in turning the cell phone into a high-powered computing device capable of running many different applications.

Shakespeare's on the (Cell) Phone

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Move over Kindle. Many readers are downloading digital books to their iPhones instead.

Search Engine Squeeze?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

There is some evidence that Baidu is abusing its position as China's internet search leader. Businesses report that salespeople working for Baidu will drop sites from search results if they don't buy sponsored links. Former business clients say their rankings fell after they stopped buying search-related ads from Baidu.

My High-Definition Crystal Ball

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Among the trends from 2008 and predictions for 2009: netbooks, new phones from Motorola and Apple, and phones running Google's Android and Microsoft's M software.

Weighed Down by Investing in Palm

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Can new products revive the lagging smartphone maker's fortunes

Now That we all Have iPods...

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple may have a problem with the iPod. It is expected that the number of iPods sold will fall by 12% next year (to only 48 million units). Also, consumers are expected to cut back on their spending in the face of the recession, which will impact iPod sales.

Small, Cheap—and Frighteningly Popular

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Manufacturers and their suppliers are worried that soaring interest in netbooks is cannibalizing PC and laptop sales.

The Taking of NASA's Secrets

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In order to save billions of dollars in research and development, some countries are using hackers to steal valuable information from America's military and scientific institutions and the defense industry that serves them.

Cisco's Brave New World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Cisco, the technology company that sells everything from million-dollar routers to videoconferencing systems, also has consulting services to help companies and countries upgrade their infrastructure.

This Social Network Is Up and Running

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The Nike+ site is drawing hordes of runners, and its success may hold lessons for brand building on the Web.

Taking the Dull Out of Dell

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Dell is struggling to maintain market share. Its founder, Michael S. Dell, returned as CEO in 2007, but so far its stock is still down by more than 60% since 2005.

Making Money Without Mad Ave

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Gaia Online, an Internet hangout for some 6 million teens, is not all that worried about how the worsening economy could hurt Web advertising. Gaia gets most of its more than $1 million in monthly revenues from sales of virtual items such as clothes, jewelry, and other accessories to dress up one's avatar, or online character.

The Dirty Secret of Recycling Electronics

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Lax rules and enforcement allow scrap firms to profit by sending e-waste overseas.

Wireless Web Phones for Less Than $50

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A new subsidiary of Hutchison Whampoa, INQ, plans to make ultracheap mobile phones for surfing the Net.

As Tech Slips, Sun Could Stumble

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

When the U.S. economy began to falter this year, many people thought the technology sector would be able to hold up. This is in part due to the fact that major technology companies usually have plenty of cash and very little debt. In addition, these companies make products that help companies save money and/or boost productivity. However, since the financial crisis got worse about a month ago, the Nasdaq (which is tech-heavy) has dropped 12%, almost twice as much as the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).

The Anti-YouTube Is Starting to Click

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Many companies have been reluctant to take on YouTube (owned by Google). But thanks to a huge library of professionally created content, Hulu is attracting millions of viewers and many advertisers.

Make-or-Break Time for Yahoo

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Yahoo! has seen its stock price sink to a five-year low, and angry shareholders are still calling for CEO Jerry Yang to step down. Now Yahoo is hoping that its new advertising service, Apex, will be the cure for its ills.

Scanning News for Slant and Cant

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

By combing journalism for bias, SpinSpotter gives new meaning to Net neutrality.

Google's Broadside Against Microsoft

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google launched an attack on Microsoft on Sep. 2 by introducing a new browser, Chrome. In addtion to taking share of the browsing market, Google also wants to change the nature of Internet browsing.

Dell vs. Apple: Why it May be Personal

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As early as September of this year, Dell plans to introduce a plan to break Apple's dominant hold on the digital entertainment market.

Has Facebook's Value Taken a Hit?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Insiders are selling stock in the company

Plugging America's Broadband Gap

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Only 60% of American households have broadband access, which puts the U.S. in 15th place among developed nations (the U.S. ranked 4th in 2001). One reason that more households haven't made the high-speed jump may be a broadband duopoly.

Broadband TVs: Are We There Yet?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

A new trend in high-definition televisions is broadband televisions. These sets are permanently connected to a broadband network and act as a computer to access sports scores, weather, videos, movies, and photos.

At Yahoo, a Threat from Within

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

So much has been made recently of the external threats to Yahoo, such as Microsoft's $47.5 billion buyout bid, Google's contract to place search ads on Yahoo pages, and corporate raider Carl Icahn's attempts to oust Yahoo's board and CEO. However, Yahoo is also facing internal problems.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Few outside of Russia have heard of Yandex, a search engine that has 44% of the Russian market (10 points more than Google). Yandex is expected to hit the Nasdaq this fall in Russia's largest-ever initial public offering in tech.

Redirecting the Web's News Stream

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Daylife and its web-based application and portal maker can automatically assemble news from multiple sources and then display it in a variety of ways.

The iPhone Eyes BlackBerry's Turf

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple's bid to win corporate wireless service customers away from RIM.

The Mini-Laptop Changing the Game

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Asustek, a Taiwanese company, produces the Eee PC, a mini-laptop that retails for around $300.

Bluetooth Comes of Age

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

After a long adolescence, it's ready to make all kinds of mobile maneuvers much easier.

Microsoft-Yahoo, Version 2.0

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Corporate raider Carl Icahn wants to get Yahoo! back to the negotiating table with Microsoft.

Why HP's Deal is a Head-Scratcher

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Hewlett-Packard (HP) announced last week that it intends to buy Electronic Data Systems (EDS) for $13.9 billion. Many people consider this a bold move by HP CEO Mark Hurd to continue to compete with International Business Machines (IBM) in the tech services business.

Inside Microsoft's War Against Google

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Many people are convinced that being able to compete with Google in the online ad business is essential to Microsoft's future profits.

How Google Fuels Its Idea Factory

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google's investors suffered a stock decrease of 35% in the early part of this year. It was feared that a weak economy would hurt the search engine's advertising business. But then the company's stock gained 20%.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Information technology services companies have typically relied on the U.S. market for a majority of their revenues. However, last quarter India-based Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) reported 51% of its revenues from North America, while only 35% of Armonk (N.Y.)-based IBM's revenues were domestic.

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The iPhone's high price and strong competition from companies like Nokia have led to shipments that are far below expectations.

In Hot Pursuit of a Video-Game Deal

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Rockstar Games is preparing to introduce the latest installment of its Grand Theft Auto (GTA) franchise on April 29 to very high expectations.

Google: What Goes up...

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Google is having growing pains and may be affected by the slowing economy. In the fourth quarter of last year, for the first time ever, the company missed Wall Street revenue forecasts. Since then, growth in the number of clicks on the paid ads appearing in Google's search results have gone flat compared with a year ago.

Motorola Sets Its Phone Unit Free

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Motorola has announced its plans to spin off its mobile-phone unit, which will become a separately traded public entity.

Microsoft Office Lurches Online

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Microsoft is very concerned about the free Web-based competitors to its Office software, such as Google and the startup Zoho.

Public Wi-Fi: Be Very Paranoid

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

When you are traveling and need to access wireless services found in airports, coffee shops, hotels, and other hotspots, you are usually not on an encrypted connection. Even when you are on an encrypted network, you are likely being protected by a form of encryption called Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) that's easily hacked.

Microsoft's Mating Dance

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The largest software firm in the world, Microsoft, has offered a $44 billion bid for the largest Internet portal company in the world, Yahoo. So far, Yahoo's management has rejected the offer as too low. Microsoft has taken the fight to the boardroom.

Google: The Hollow Echo of a Click

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

As Web surfers click on fewer ads and the correlation between clicks and sales disappears, search engine companies are trying to find new ways for advertisers to reach their audiences.

Gore, Geldof, Venter...and This Guy?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Ben Kaufman's new social-networking business, Kluster, hopes to take advantage of the economy of free labor, which has worked well for sites like Wikipedia, Facebook and MySpace.

HP's Hurd Is About to Be Tested

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Since Mark Hurd was named the CEO of HP in 2005 to the end of 2007, HP's stock increased 132% (around five times the return of the S&P 500). 2008, however, will likely be Hurd's most difficult year to date.

Generation MySpace is Getting Fed up

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Social networking is supposed to be the next big thing on the Internet but many of the sites, such as MySpace and Facebook, have been annoying the Millenials.

On the Trail of the Missing iPhones

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

In what has been dubbed the Mystery of the Missing iPhones, last month, Apple and AT&T reported that 1.7 million iPhones had been purchased but not activated on the AT&T network, meaning that there are 1.7 million iPhones out there being used for unknown purposes.

EBay's New Tough Love CEO

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

John Donahoe, the new CEO of eBay, has said that his first priority will be revitalizing the company's core business. He plans to reduce some of the fees that eBay charges sellers (to draw in more users and to persuade them to offer a greater array of products) and to make some major investments in technology.

International Isn't Just IBM's First Name

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

IBM has had to undergo a monumental shift in its operational philosophy. In the past three years, IBM has hired more than 90,000 people in fast-developing countries like Brazil, China, and India.

Steve Jobs' Video Dreams

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple has made a huge splash in digital music with its iPod, but Hollywood is fighting its efforts to make the same impact in the video arena. Although it has been two years since Apple added video capability to its iPod line and began selling a smattering of shows and movies on the iTunes Music Store, its amount of video content remains very small. Jobs, the CEO of Apple, will try to change that with the launch of a movie rental service on iTunes. In addition, Apple is planning a major upgrade of the slow-selling Apple TV set-top box.

Measuring Your Digital Footprint

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Garlik's new service QDOS has taken the digital measure of all 45 million adults in Britain, rating them on how active they are online, their popularity, individuality, and impact on all things digital. The company plans to provide service in the U.S. by the first quarter of 2008 and to assign scores to half a billion people worldwide by yearend.

Just Ahead: A Wider Wireless World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The long-expected revolution in the wireless communications market may finally come to pass. It will probably be better for consumers, but not so great for carriers and mobile device manufacturers.

Psst! Wanna Buy an iPhone?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Apple's popular cell phone, the iPhone, isn't legally available in China yet, but you can buy one at any electronics shop in Beijing for around $680. These iPhones have been purchased elsewhere and smuggled into China. They have then been hacked so that they can use local cell-phone carriers, and Chinese characters have been inputted onto their touch screens.

Microsoft's Nifty Digital Shoebox

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

PCs are now serving two very different purposes. They are not only a tool for e-mail, Web browsing, writing and managing finances, but increasingly the computer is becoming a repository for digital files such as photos, music, videos, and various documents such as financial records.

Online, Souped Up, and Making Tracks

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Edmunds started in 1966 as a publisher of booklets packed with automotive specifications. These were intended to help car shoppers make buying decisions. The Edmunds Web site was launched in 1995 by a skunk works team of employees. It is now the go-to online resource about cars. According to one analyst, It's become the iconic name for car research and pricing.

Amateur Hour Is Over

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Forget user-generated videos. Advertisers want to see some slick glitz and tinsel.

Threadless: From Clicks to Bricks

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Threadless, a small online T-shirt company, will join the likes of clothing startups Lucy.com and Delias.com in moving from online to bricks and mortar.

Tim Wu, Freedom Fighter

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Tim Wu, a professor at Columbia Law School, is fighting for Net neutrality both on the Internet and in the wireless arena. He proposes a new vision for the U.S. wireless industry.

So Many Ads, So Few Clicks

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

Online advertising click-through rates have been steadily declining (0.75% to 0.27% during 2006), and the cost of click-through advertising has been dropping as well.

Get Your Hands Off the Web

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Communication

The BusinessWeek opinion article Get Your Hands Off the Web (November 5, 2007) suggests that telecommunications firms like Verizon have too much control over broadband content distribution. They have policies which bar distribution of controversial or unsavory content; in fact, Verizon recently released a statement that it reserves the right to deny other (communications) in the future.


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