Competencies

Readings: Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Behold the Sheer Artistry of Tesla's Bond

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For Tesla's true-believer shareholders, all that stands between CEO Elon Musk realizing his vision and validating their risky bet is adequate liquidity. The bond market, from that perspective, looks like an infinity pool of capital. Even so, it's $1.8 billion debut in the high-yield bond market is surprising for several reasons.

All the President’s LLCs

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Affluent Americans such as President Trump pay a 3.8 percent tax on their investment income — unless they know how to use an S corporation. In 2017, the S corporation loophole will allow about $16.7 billion in tax avoidance, according to 2016 estimates from the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Dropbox Gets Ready for the Road

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Dropbox is making more money and turning a profit. However, the company may not go public at its last private valuation as it invests further in battling Microsoft and Google.

Will Bosch Choke on VW's Exhaust?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bosch, the German auto parts manufacturer, is investing billions of dollars in R&D as it works to transform itself into a global technology company. In the midst of this endeavor, the company is facing increasing scrutiny for the role it may have played in the diesel emissions scandal that first came to light in VW cars. While Bosch’s role remains unclear, potential damages could be in the billions and the reputation costs could affect the company’s future.

Horse DNA Trading

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cloning is a term met with a good deal of skepticism and fear. This is somewhat justified, but can there be uses that would make its techniques valuable and ethical? The performance horse industry believes it can. It has already achieved success and acceptance in several divisions using techniques mastered by Crestview Genetics of Texas. The company hasn't let its success whither. It's now considering limited forays into human cloning to aid areas such as diabetes research. Crestview claims to be worth $75 million.

U.S. Oil's $10 Billion Venezuelan Threat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Several U.S. refineries have been specifically calibrated to work with Venezuela's sludgy high-density, high-sulphur crude oil. Last year, $10 billion of Venezuelan crude oil was imported and refined, helping keep gas prices low. But with the political and economic turmoil in Venezuela, as well as the possibility of sanctions against Venezuela's government, U.S. consumers and refiners could face adverse consequences.

Who's Afraid of Low Volatility?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You can speculate on stocks going up or stocks going down, but you can also wager on how extreme the ups and downs will be. Investors who bet on calm have done stupendously well lately, but the persistence of extreme calm may have pushed investors toward strategies that could blow up if volatility returns.

The Everyman Ride For the Upper Half

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tesla Model 3, which starts at $35,000, has racked up almost half a million reservations and is drawing more deposits by the day. However, price creep for better-equipped models could reduce that number. CEO Elon Musk described plans to quickly ramp up output of the Model 3 as “production hell” for workers at Tesla’s lone car assembly plant in Fremont, California.

He Objects

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

“Disclosure-only” settlements can generate legal fees for lawyers but no money for the shareholders they represent. Ted Frank is trying to kill them off. Meet Ted Frank, professional objector and lawyer, who is making it less profitable to sue when companies merge.

The Hatchet Men And the Hot Dog

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brazil's 3G Capital has grown by buying well-known consumer product companies and cutting costs. It typically makes deep cuts to expenses, including closing factories, laying off workers, and getting rid of expensive perks. To grow, it also looks to grow market share in countries where the brands are less well known.

The Hatchet Men and the Hot Dog

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

"I wish I were an Oscar Mayer Weiner." But would you want to own the company and be responsible for this product line? 3G Capital, along with Warren Buffett, decided they did, though not only that brand but all of Kraft's brands. The wiener does represent a sound microcosm of the problems facing large brands that were stalwarts over the past century. 3G is known for cost cutting to gain returns on their investments. They are taking a new approach with Oscar Mayer.

'Chairman Cohn' Has a Nice Ring to It

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gary Cohn, President Trump's chief economic adviser and longtime president of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., is under consideration to be the next Chair of the Federal Reserve. His leadership style, however, may not be a great fit with the organizational culture of the Federal Reserve. In a setting where markets hang on the nuances of even slight changes in wording, Cohn's bulldog approach and penchant for off-the-cuff remarks could be unsettling to markets and Fed employees.

That Seventies Startup

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Infosci’s septua- and octogenarian founders are looking to flip their security company as soon as the technology is ready. Its exit strategy is to move fast and get just far enough to attract a buyer such as Dell Technologies Inc. or Alphabet Inc. or perhaps a private equity company.

China’s Elusive Goal: A Global Apparel Brand

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sophisticated Chinese apparel manufacturers are behind most leading global apparel brands, and some would like to move forward with their own global brands. Down coat maker Bosideng’s retreat after five years in London is a cautionary tale.

That Seventies Startup

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When we think of entrepreneurs in the Internet and computing world, we typically envision young mavericks with concepts derived from their state-of-the-art classes at top colleges. Here we see three guys well over seventy who have come up with a competitive product in the arena of IT security. Their perspective differs from those following the more traditional approach but may still be as effective.

Robot Advisers Can Be Conflicted, Too

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some of the big banks’ new algorithmic programs may favor funds from companies that pay the banks millions of dollars for access to their wealthy clients. Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, and Wells Fargo take payments from fund companies whose products their advisers (and robo-advisers) might sell.

The Hijacking of the Brillante Virtuoso

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Brillante Virtuoso was allegedly hijacked and destroyed by Somali pirates, but circumstances surrounding the 2011 explosion and fire on the ship remain a mystery. Details of the case are intriguing, but the story also highlights the challenges insurers have in distinguishing between legitimate casualty losses and fraud. This uncertainty may contribute to insurers’ tendency to settle shipping claims, but the practice may encourage insurance fraud and pass the cost on to consumers.

Black Executives Are Losing Ground at Some Big Banks

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite promising to increase diversity, over the last five years the percentage of black employees at most large Wall Street banks has been stagnant and even inching downward. The trend is similar for percentages of black senior executives. The explanation is not obvious, but the banks recognize that their success may depend on attracting a diverse employee base.

Violence Raises Oil Risk in Mexico

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In 2013, Mexico passed legislation that eliminated state-owned monopolies in the electricity and oil industries. This change meant to attract foreign investment into these industries to increase efficiency and stimulate new discoveries. For the oil industry, however, theft and violence create a huge potential cost for would-be investors.

China's Elusive Goal: A Global Apparel Brand

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gao Dekang grew Bosideng from a small factory with eleven workers to a global apparel powerhouse and the largest maker of down coats in China. As a manufacturer, Bosideng makes coats for many well known brands, including Adidas, North Face, and Columbia Sportswear. Domestically in China, Bosideng has a strong brand, but it has had difficulty taking its brand global.

Alibaba Tries to Get in the Game

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's disproportionately small sports industry and amateur community reflect decades of limited government support and insufficient disposable incomes. Alibaba's tiny sports arm is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to nurture China's interest in sports and related merchandise.

Innovation: Needle Grinder

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Disposal of needles used in the medical field are a concern for both society and risk-control managers involved in the waste-management field. Sterilis, a small startup firm located in Massachusetts, has created a unit that is said to save $1,000 per month in disposal costs.

It's Happening Again

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It’s classic subprime: hasty loans, rapid defaults, and, at times, outright fraud. This time, it's the auto industry and not mortgages. Investors love the high-yield asset-backed securities composed from these loans, but some are starting to question whether the yield premium is worth the substantial and increasing risk.

Wal-Mart Cracks the Whip on Suppliers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As it increases wages, cuts prices, and moves to compete with Amazon, Wal-Mart is looking for efficiencies wherever it can find them. By stepping up the pressure on suppliers to make nearly perfect deliveries, Wal-Mart expects to both increase revenue and lower costs.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Carlos Ghosn has assembled an alliance of auto manufacturers that has a global reach. He successfully turned around the struggling French auto company Renault, and later was successful with Nissan. The alliance now includes Mitsubishi, AvtoVaz, and Dongfeng.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As chairman and CEO of a global alliance of auto companies, Carlos Ghosn has had success with helping struggling companies become more profitable. He believes in cutting marginal operations so that he can invest in the more profitable ones and help them thrive. He is an advocate of globalization.

Where Minority-Worker Networks Are Passé

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Many employers have encouraged and supported the development of workplace affinity groups. Now Deloitte has decided to eliminate workplace affinity groups and try to focus more on inclusion and working together on diversity issues.

Pins and Needles in the Heart of the Alps

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Forster Rohner AG produces fine textiles and lace in factories in Switzerland, Romania, and China. The factory in Switzerland is highly automated, while also employing highly skilled workers who prepare very detailed work by hand. In addition to its 250 Swiss employees, the company employs another 640 at factories in Romania and China, where lower priced goods are produced.

Uber Without the Smartphone

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Common Courtesy helped design Uber Central and has inspired dozens of copycats. Retired couple Anne and Bob Carr and like-minded small businesses have made Uber and Lyft more senior-friendly.

Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Appraisers

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Advances in big data at Zillow Group Inc. and elsewhere are helping automation creep into knowledge-based professions. Freddie Mac, a big force in the U.S. mortgage market, is allowing some loans to go through without an appraisal by a human being.

New Lloyd, Same Goldman

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lloyd Blankfein, Goldman Sachs' second longest serving CEO, survived the financial crisis and then cancer. His recent decision to stay on as CEO has led to questions from investors and analysts about whether he can rejuvenate a business that has struggled to show revenue growth for the past five years and where trading market share has stayed flat as rivals gained ground.

Stand By . . . Scanning for Viruses and Secrets

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It would appear that simply the inclusion of the word "Russia" sparks fears of espionage and fears of collusion to destroy the United States. To ramp that up even more, include cybersecurity in the discussion.

New Lloyd, Same Goldman

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lloyd Blankfein has been chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs for more than eleven years and seen the company through the financial crisis of the last decade. He also just went through a medical crisis of his own, completing 600 hours of chemotherapy to treat lymphoma. He recently opened a Twitter account and used his first tweet to criticize President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. He is positioning Goldman Sachs to profit from an improving worldwide economy.

Mobile Carriers Start Hanging Up on Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The past decade has seen a significant buildup of mobile phone networks across Africa, with countries auctioning spectrum to multinational bidders that hoped to cash in on the projected growth of subscribers on the continent. The costs involved, along with new regulatory hurdles, have caused some multinational telecom firms to scale back on their investments. One new wrinkle is requiring mobile phone operators to at least partially list their shares on local exchanges and make stock ownership available to local investors.

The Crazy Math Behind Drug Prices

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Insulin prices have soared 270 percent in the past 10 years. Intermediaries that negotiate to lower prices may cause them to increase, too. Courts are being asked to rule on the role of pharmacy benefit managers in that inflation.

Cash Comes Back in India

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Indian government invalidated some denominations of the rupee almost overnight, to curtail the shadow economy, giving a sharp boost to digital payments. However Indians have used cash for about 98 percent of consumer payments. There is a huge trust deficit toward mobile phone apps and cards for digital transactions.

The Tech Selloff Couldn't Come at a Worse Time for These Funds

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fortresses of calm three months ago, low-vol's newly minted members are behaving badly. Several large factor ETFs that are billed for their low volatility have recently been cauldrons of turbulence after a three-week span in which computer and Internet stocks went from being the market’s best to its worst performers.

Remodeling a Sedan Plant for the SUV Era

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Large factories require large volume to run efficiently. As the American market has shifted from sedans to SUVs and trucks, Toyota Motor Corp. has decided to spend $1.3 billion to transform its huge Camry plant in Kentucky to one that can produce 11 different vehicles and shift quickly among them.

Want a $1 Million Paycheck? Skip College and Go Work in a Lumberyard

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Vocational education is no longer a focus of the U.S. educational system, and most U.S. high school students start college. With rising college debt and many blue-collar jobs going unfilled, other paths are now getting more attention. 84 Lumber is one of the companies bringing attention to high-paying blue-collar job opportunities through high profile ads and training programs.

Man vs Machine Dermatology

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

"There is an app for that" has become a favorite phrase in our society. In many ways, it has addressed the way we seek to address our health care needs. While not an app, this evaluative mechanism uses technology to skip a step typically performed by dermatologists. The software is designed to evaluate the users skin for signs of skin cancer, allowing the person the advantages of early and accurate detection so that the doctor can focus on treatment.

China Is Missing the Chips Rush

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. government has been blocking the sale of several semiconductor firms to companies that are affiliated with the Chinese government. The concern is that the U.S. government does not want the Chinese government to have access to and future control over technology being developed at these companies. It is unclear, however, whether blocking these particular deals will have much impact on the future growth and success of the Chinese semiconductor industry.

Remember Nokia?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nokia has a long history, dating from before the establishment of Finland as a country, and has run a variety of different businesses over its existence. It became known internationally as a pioneer in mobile phones, and for several years was the world's leading producer of mobile phones. While Nokia sold the phone handset business to Microsoft after it experienced a significant drop in marketshare, it is still a major global competitor in providing networking equipment and telecommunications infrastructure to mobile phone service providers (e.g., Verizon, Orange, AT&T, Vodaphone) across the globe.

Paid In Semi Full

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There is an indisputable gender pay gap in the United States, but the source of this pay gap and what could or should be done about it remain open questions. Personal decisions may explain some of the observed pay differences, but companies that have examined their compensation have found inequities that can’t be explained this way. Some companies have been working to address this issue for decades, while other companies are resisting calls to simply provide data.

500,000 Tons of Steel. 14 Jobs

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As politicians and countries maneuver to keep steel mills and other factories at home, the companies are maneuvering to maintain their competitiveness through automation. Voestalpine AG’s fully automated steel wire plant has only 14 jobs, but they are “really attractive.”

Myanmar's Hotel Room Glut

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Myanmar's government is transitioning, it clearly sees the opportunity for tourism development, and it has strongly encouraged it by creating some of the necessary infrastructural components. Unfortunately, the tourism sector has yet to kick in, and this is causing some consternation.

CNN Has Had Enough

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Media companies are getting sick of Facebook. News outlets are complaining about Facebook's terms for TV-quality videos meant to compete with YouTube.

Target Slips Up

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The No. 2 U.S. discounter, Target, faces a revitalized Whole Foods, backed by a deep-pocketed parent-to-be. Retailers are adding groceries to their mix because they keep customers coming back. But Target gets only 20 percent of sales from food, while Wal-Mart gets 56 percent.

The Asian Jobs Ladder Is Broken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For the past several decades, labor-intensive manufacturing of textiles and clothing has shifted from higher wage countries to lower wage countries, and in the process helped bring jobs and economic growth to increasingly poorer countries. With advances in technology and automation, however, that regular shift to the next country with lower pay levels may be coming to an end.

Where Buffett Failed

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A ten-person shoemaking startup in Maine is trying to keep the craft of hand-sewn footwear profitable in the era of globalization.

Finally, a Cheap(ish) iPhone

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple is making old iPhones new again to win India. Old-gen models like the 5S make up more than half of Apple’s shipments to the subcontinent.

A Billionaire Emerges on the Silicon Steppe

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A Russian software billionaire takes on SAP and Oracle. Boris Nuraliev has built a fortune with enterprise software tailored to Russian needs. He uses a franchise model in which partners are licensed to install its software and adapt it to the needs of each particular business.

The Price of a Digital World

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Twenty-five years ago, U.S. chipmakers vowed to stop using chemicals that caused miscarriages and birth defects. And they did—by outsourcing the danger to women in Asia.

The Price of a Digital World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the 1980s and 1990s, a series of studies in the United States showed that workers at semiconductor manufacturing facilities had abnormally high rates of miscarriages. The US industry responded by trying to eliminate many of the most noxious chemicals, improve working conditions, and shifting semiconductor manufacturing to other countries. More recently, the handling of highly toxic chemicals in semiconductor plants has also been associated with a number of other health problems, including cancer, infertility, and birth defects in the children of male workers.

Why You Still Can’t Trust Your Financial Adviser

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An attorney is bound to zealously represent you; a doctor pledges to do no harm. So why aren’t financial advisers subject to the same duty? The new Fiduciary Rule would have required financial advisers to put clients first when handling retirement accounts, but the Trump administration may be getting ready to gut it.

A Reputation for Badoo Behavior

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The aligning of corporate culture with the vision and mission of the organization has always been assumed to be a strong antecedent to higher levels of performance. With companies such as Badoo, a dating site popular in Russia and Latin America, the human resource practices used to attract and retain personnel have flown in the face of current acceptable practices. Parties that include risqué activities have become legendary in its corporate offices in London. This troubles some, but obviously attracts the talent that Andrey Andreev, its founder, perceives to create the environment conducive to growing his profitable business.

Dept. of Shell Companies, Clandestine Accounts, & Bribery

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Corruption and bribery may be more common than not in the Brazilian construction industry, but for Odebrecht SA it grew over decades to a scale that ultimately proved unsustainable. In exchange for shorter sentences, Odebrecht principals are providing details of their transactions and the systems they devised to support bribery activities. This in turn, is revealing the roles banks and others played, both inside of Brazil and in other countries.

Silicon Valley’s Secret Source of Foreign Workers

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There is a secret way Silicon Valley uses the H-1B program. Indian companies are applying for a lot of visas for workers to fill jobs at the headquarters of American tech companies.

Putting Home Sales Ahead of Paperwork

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Real estate companies are using cloud computing to save time and money when buying and selling homes. Agents are spending less time scheduling and more time selling. Innovative ideas and processes using cloud computing are enhancing real estate sales and marketing.

Smiles Aren't Factory-Made

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An obsession with building factories that make "things" that could be more efficiently produced in other countries could be counter-productive to improving the economic health of working-class Americans. The highest paying jobs, and the most valued added, come from the early stages or product design and development, and the latter stages of customer service and support. Policies that would encourage companies to invest in low-margin manufacturing operations, rather than other activities, could hurt their overall competitiveness and lead to prices increases for U.S. consumers.

Laid-Off Indian IT Workers Blame Trump

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There are changes and challenges in the $110-billion outsourcing business at the heart of India's economy. This is said to be primarily due to automation and changes in the U.S. immigration policy.

India’s Movie Industry Gets a New Script

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An Indian blockbuster, "Baahubali 2," had box-office revenues of more than $230 million in three weeks. This could spark more films outside the Bollywood mold. India produces 1,500 to 2,000 films a year and generated about $2.2 billion in 2016. It has about six screens per million viewers, versus 23 per million in China and 126 per million in the U.S.

I Can Haz Make You Money?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

ETFs that focus on trending themes or factors, such as being "biblically responsible," are exploding in popularity and creating a gold rush for their creators. The author of this article created a smart beta ETF with stocks of companies with names that have "CAT" in them, which rang up an 849,751 percent return based on past prices. She then found out why that wouldn't make her rich.

Here Comes the Space Cleanup Crew

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

What goes up must come down. We are all aware of the old adage, and it has sparked concern for people as we launch more and more items into space that remain in close orbit. Now, the desirable orbits have become more cluttered, and the risk to very expensive new technology launched into orbit is becoming an issue. Technology is now addressing this as innovators have begun to invent cleanup satellites to remove space junk.

Norway Ditches the 'Fossil Car'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Norway has high taxes on most cars, easily doubling the price of a new car. And even though the country is rich with oil, the price at the pump is around $7 a gallon. Electricity, however, is relatively inexpensive, and electric vehicles are exempt from most tolls. With these sorts of governmental policies, it is not surprising that Norway has the highest per-capita adoption of electric vehicles.

How Does Tax Avoidance Play in Peoria?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Like many high-profile companies, Caterpillar structured international transactions to reduce its U.S. taxable income. One of the company's tax accountants reported this under whistleblower statutes. Now, Caterpillar faces a $2 billion IRS bill in back taxes, and the accountant may collect hundreds of millions of dollars in the biggest whistleblower award ever. The series of events leading up to the ongoing investigation highlight issues related to the connections among business ethics, organizational culture, leadership, and human resource management.

How Does Tax Avoidance Play in Peoria?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Caterpillar has been a symbol of U.S. manufacturing worldwide, with its equipment in use in probably every country. The company is also known for its ability to deliver parts to repair the equipment, wherever it is being used. Where the profits on those parts should be booked, and taxes paid, however, is now under scrutiny.

Data Mining To Find Tax Cheaters

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has prioritized information in amnesty deals, and this is empowering IRS efforts to shut down tax evasion achieved by hiding money in offshore accounts. Both U.S. taxpayers and Swiss banks have avoided prosecution by providing records and other information related to tax evasion. Using this data, the IRS is now tracking down taxpayers who use foreign bank accounts to evade taxes as well as the companies and advisors who facilitate these efforts.

Short Sellers Resist Covering as S&P 500 Retakes Record in Week

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Short interest has risen to a record level even though stocks continue to post record gains. Bears are concerned that any mishap from President Donald Trump could wreak havoc in a market where valuations are at levels not seen since the dot-com era.

Cessna Flights for the Masses

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The basic concept of Uber is now spreading into other transportation arenas as well. A new California-based startup, Blackbird Air Inc., is providing a ride-sharing app for short-distance air travel. The app matches travelers that are time constrained with flights originating from general aviation airfields. These passengers would otherwise tie up valuable time using commercial air travel or driving to their destination. The price is significantly lower than chartering a flight.

Cessna Flights for the Masses

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A startup in San Francisco, Blackbird Air Inc., is trying to connect more planes with passengers through its Uber-style on-demand app, at much lower prices than the $5,000 a traditional charter might cost. Blackbird’s online marketplace offers seats on small planes for much less than typical charter prices.

Can VR Find a Seat in the Parlor?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Virtual reality is not a hit at home, so Imax tries arcades. Imax is piloting VR centers, since the cost of equipment has been a drag on consumers’ embrace of virtual reality. Tech and entertainment companies are racing for a slice of the virtual reality business, which Goldman estimates could generate $80 billion in revenue by 2025.

China's Foodmakers Try New Growth Recipes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Concerns over food safety and contamination have led many Chinese consumers to prefer Western brands. In order to help bolster their reputation and move up-market into premium brands, large Chinese food conglomerates have purchased Western food companies. One of the largest deals was the almost $7 billion WH Group paid for U.S.-based Smithfield Foods, the world's largest pork processor.

All About the Benjamins

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

General Motors is posting record profits even as its major rivals are moving to lower investors' expectations. CEO Mary Barra's heavy focus on profitability, and operating margins in particular, has led her to scale back or entirely abandon investments in emerging markets like India and Russia, although those markets represent many millions of annual vehicle sales. She says that GM won't win by being all things to all people everywhere.

All About the Benjamins

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mary Barra may be leading GM away from its past as she focuses on a profitable future. GM is leaving some markets to focus on high profit margins and investments that will position it for a period of rapid change in the auto industry. In addition to changing the company's strategy, this focus is also changing elements of GM's culture.

The Airbnb of Warehousing

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Flexe Inc., a four-year-old startup, has attained a competitive position against the powerful Amazon.com juggernaut based upon an expanded network of warehousing space created by strategic alliances that take advantage of seasonal supply-and-demand mismatches. It's a solid strategy because Flexe has already attained 25 percent of Amazon's warehouse capacity and has plans to add 10 million square feet within the year. The company's business model is not to become the face of its clients but to become a conduit for efficiently delivering vendors' products to their end customers relative to Amazon's model.

The Talking Cat and the Peroxide Corporation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese manufacturing and industrial companies, looking for growth opportunities but facing slower growth in China, are looking at foreign opportunities. One example is the recent purchase of Slovenian app maker Outfit7 by Zhejiang Jinke Peroxide Co. for $1 billion. With clearly no operational synergies, this is simply an example of foreign direct investment for financial reasons.

Waze Wants to Help You Hitch a Ride

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's Waze is doing more than just traffic maps. Now it's trying its hand at carpooling.

Long Reach, Big Problems

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Etihad Airway's strategy of building a global network by purchasing interests in financially struggling regional carriers helped the company quickly build a presence in the global airline industry. Some of the airlines in which it invested, however, including Alitalia and Air Berlin, continue to lose money and have weak competitive positions. The architect of this strategy, CEO James Hogan, is now on his way out as Etihad reviews its strategy.

Satellite Pics for Cheap!!

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An Iranian immigrant in Silicon Valley is challenging the $500 million behemoths and touting night shots that pierce cloud cover. Spy-quality satellite imaging for cheap.

MBA Programs Tout Entrepreneurship

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Strong demand from students has many business schools, including a number of top ones, offering entrepreneurship-focused MBA programs. But few MBA graduates start businesses, and recruiters may be less interested in such students.

How to Launder a Russian

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Russians have loaded up on Cyprus’s citizenship program that attracted $4.4 billion in foreign investment last year. Cypriot citizenship helps them avoid the prying eyes of their government and pay lower taxes, and may make it easier to move money, because banks see them as benign locals, rather than potentially suspicious foreigners. One Russian got citizenship after buying two Limassol villas.

This Home Camera Can Tell Who’s There

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Current technologies allow people to remotely access cameras in their home, or at work, to see if anyone enters and ascertain what they are doing. This is useful, but many times, the alert is triggered by people who are supposed to be there, and it is more bothersome than useful. Using 3D sensors and facial recognition software, Lighthouse, a startup, is improving the efficiency of these cameras by only bringing the exceptions to the user's mobile device.

Come for the Treadmill Desk, Stay for the...

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The automotive industry faces potentially disruptive change, including the introduction of self-driving cars. In response, U.S. automakers are making acquisitions and trying to reinvent their work cultures to attract talent. Nevertheless, Detroit may remain a tough sell for young computer and software engineers.

When Fighting (Alleged) Crime Doesn’t Pay

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A whistleblower who helped bring Rothenberg Ventures under SEC investigation still faces costs.

China—With Western Help—Finds Its Wings

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Comac, or Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China Ltd., is planning to compete with Boeing and Airbus in the aircraft industry. Comac's model C919 took its first flight last week from Shanghai. The Chinese domestic market for aircraft of this size, a single-aisle model that can carry 158-174 passengers, is expected to be more than 5,000 aircraft over the next 20 years.

Google's Other Founder Wants to Fly, Too

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Google co-founder Larry Page garners the headlines with flying cars, Sergey Brin, his partner at Google is quietly pursuing a flight oriented business as well. Though using an older technology, it may end up being more readily profitable for him. Airships, sometimes referred to as blimps, have been developed and used for over a century, but Brin sees the opportunity to transport freight more efficiently now that the technologies have become more defined.

Juno Got Sold, and Its Drivers Got Stiffed

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rather than sharing in a windfall when Juno was acquired, drivers who held unvested shares in the new ride-hailing company were informed that the stock plan was void. Some of these drivers had left Uber because of the chance to own an equity interest as well as Juno's promise to treat drivers with respect and fairness. Less than a year later, the company that promised to treat drivers better than Uber seems to have broken that promise.

Why Mexico's Autoworkers Aren't Prospering

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The role of unions in Mexican factories is a bit different from the standard procedure in the United States. Before a factory even opens, a contract is signed between a local labor union that will represent workers and the factory's owner. Dues are paid by the factory, and many workers are not even aware they are members of the union.

Kaplan Sells Its College But Keeps Its Profits

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Purdue University has teamed up with the for-profit Kaplan higher-education chain to sell online degrees. It is a way for for-profit colleges to shed a tarnished label and still stay in business. It helps public universities expand their reach with online degrees targeting older Americans—many of them minorities—who are unable to attend traditional schools.

Seriously, Beware the ‘Shadow Brokers’

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The hacking tools released by Shadow Brokers may have infected more than 400,000 computers and could be tough to erase. The group’s NSA-quality malware release isn’t just another hack.

Secondary Offerings Take Center Stage

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Secondary stock offerings since the 2016 U.S. presidential election are up 79 percent from a year earlier. Small-cap stocks have dominated that market. Higher post-election valuations based on hopes for deregulation and tax reform are also fueling M&A activity for smaller companies.

Innovation: Synthetic Tissues

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

3-D printing has been a topic of conversation and application for over a decade now, but making prototypes of products and even finished products for consumer use has been the focus. Now materials are being developed that allow for healthcare applications including bone and cartilage materials tailor-made for the patient and even the very real possibility of creating organic tissues for such problems as chronic liver failure.

China's Robot Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China is fast becoming one of the larger markets for workplace automation. This has led to the development of a large number of Chinese companies in the robotics and automation industries, though many currently just assemble components designed and manufactured by leading German, American, and Japanese robotics companies. But in the process, these companies and Chinese central planners are working to create a competitive robotics industry in China.

White Men Can Change at Rockwell Automation

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Diversity and promotion of minorities at Rockwell Automation's has improved as a result of actions designed to change the attitudes of its largely white, male staff. Employees take training programs that encourage them to better see the world, and the company, through the eyes of minority employees. Employees are sensitized to recognize attitudes and behaviors that cause minorities to feel unwelcome.

BlackRock Fights A Price War, Selectively

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Market leader BlackRock Inc. sells cheap and expensive funds at the same time. Catering to both advisers and big traders spurs record inflows.

Whole Foods Market’s Identity Crisis

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Whole Foods Market CEO John Mackey’s new book, The Whole Foods Diet, furthers his mission to improve people’s health through diet. But investors are concerned about a lack of action to reverse a sales slump and falling stock price.

Whole Foods Market's Identity Crisis

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Whole Foods Market was long the darling of the ecologically sensitive investors in that they tapped into a solid market that had a loyal and growing client base and high profit margins. As many mass retailers began to move into the grocery sector and also the organic/ecologically advantaged products market, they began to first thwart the growth of Whole Foods Market, but now there are also concerns of reducing sales and profits.

Whole Foods Market’s Identity Crisis

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Six straight quarters of declining same-store sales have forced Whole Foods Market, which has about 440 U.S. stores, to close stores and rein in costs. It has been pushing digital coupons and promotions while working to lower costs.

In Turkey, New Powers Won’t Fix Old Problems

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The narrow victory on April 16, 2017’s referendum vote for expanding the powers for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Turkey will not likely fix the ailing economy or reduce terrorism. Erdogan might take the victory as a mandate to reject European values and become increasingly inward-looking.

U.S. Dental Labs Are Gritting Their Teeth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Manufacturing of dentures and dental implants has become more automated and is increasingly done in low-wage locations. A combination of the use of digital technology, consolidation among dentists, and lower costs overseas has contributed to a shift in production of dental fixtures. U.S. manufacturers that have remained competitive have shed jobs by investing in automation.

Security Software, Insecurity Culture

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In eight months, cyber-security startup Tanium Inc. has lost at least nine senior executives. This executive exodus is occurring despite the company’s ongoing success and growth. The CEO’s behavior may be the explanation.

Chinese Cars May Lose Their Learner's Permits

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China is the world's largest auto market, and most cars are sold under a foreign brand name. This is a result of China's policy of requiring foreign car makers to work with a joint venture partner, and in the process transfer some technology and manufacturing expertise. As the Chinese government considers dropping this restriction, it could hurt local manufacturers who have come to depend on the profit streams from foreign-branded vehicles.

How Much Is a Miracle Worth?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In order to price its new cure for a rare form of child blindness, Spark Therapeutics Inc. is trying to determine how much people are willing to pay for sight. Insurers are trying to figure out how to pay for such "miracle" cures.

Nice Stent If You Can Get It

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A clot-retrieving stent can dramatically reduce long-term healthcare costs and enhance the quality of life for people who have had strokes, yet it is only extensively used in roughly 150 stroke centers in the United States. While initial cost for installation of the stent is about $17,000 more than that of traditional treatment methods, its outcome is better, and the long-term savings could be about $23,000.

How Much Is a Miracle Worth?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New technologies are making the possibility of "miracle" drug treatments a reality. One-time drug treatments can now cure conditions that previously required ongoing lifetime drug treatment regimens. Wonderful for patients, these treatments create pricing and payment challenges that will require different financial approaches and a balance between corporate interests and social responsibility.

Traders’ New Favorite Way to Swap Secrets

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Encrypted messaging apps are raising risk of widespread abuse. Employees at big banks share gossip, client data, and more. Investment banks regularly monitor only certain trading-floor lines, and at least until 2018, financial firms generally aren't required to record employees' calls.

How Much Is a Miracle Worth?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Spark Therapeutics Inc. has spent about $400 million developing a blindness cure. What's unclear is how to price the breakthrough.

Wall Street’s New Favorite Way to Swap Secrets Is Against the Rules

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Encrypted messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal are raising concerns about widespread abuse by traders at big banks. The apps are an easy and virtually untraceable way to circumvent compliance, get around the HR police and keep bosses in the dark. A deeper concern is that the apps could enable reckless and illegal behavior that's all but impossible to police.

Munchery Stiffs Early Backers and Cuts Staff in a Bid for Survival

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Munchery Inc., a food delivery startup, has blown through $120 million over the past 7 years and needs further investment of around $15 million to shore up its position. In order to accomplish this recapitalization, they are having to reduce the stake of early investors and create convertible debt to entice reinvestments or new investments.

Jeff Bezos Goes Grocery Shopping

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon’s goal is to become a Top 5 grocery retailer by 2025. This would require more than $30 billion in annual food and beverage spending through its sites, up from $8.7 billion—including Amazon Fresh and all other food and drink sales—in 2016.

The Smartest Machines Are Playing Games

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Artificial intelligence researchers are training their systems to master steadily more complex fantasy worlds. The holy grail is solving not one game but any game with multiple players and imperfect information, as in the real world.

How to Prepare for Your Star’s Exit

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Losing a key employee can create challenges for any business. For small businesses, it can be devastating. While this risk cannot be eliminated, it can be managed.

Remember That Time Trump Said He Saved 1,100 Jobs at a Carrier Plant in Indiania?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In early 2016, Carrier announced it would be closing a furnace factory in Indiana and shifting production to Mexico. In a mature manufacturing industry that requires minimal skilled labor, the two primary ways to reduce operating costs are to increase automation and/or lower wage costs. One approach to lowering wage costs is to shift production to lower wage locations. In Carrier's case and in the words of its CEO, the timing happened to coincide with the "silly political season" that was short on "adult supervision." The Indiana plant, however, will for now remain open.

The Smartest Machines Are Playing Games

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Artificial intelligence is being used for gaming. Can the results help solve real world problems?

Uber Self-Driving Vehicle Involved in Arizona Crash

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A major hiccup occurred for Uber last week. A photo of the damage from an incident in Arizona involving their self-driving vehicle was posted to Twitter. The company verified the photo, but no further discussion was offered.

Don’t Let the Monster Eat You Up

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Beginning in the 1990s, Alabama used tax breaks and other incentives to attract foreign auto manufacturers to the state. As multiple auto companies built factories in Alabama, auto-parts makers followed. Questions about safety violations and working conditions at these auto parts factories raise questions about potential costs associated with Alabama's manufacturing renaissance.

Will Bad Beef Taint Brazil's Meat Master?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brazil's JBS SA is the world's largest meat producer and is preparing to raise additional funds via bond sales and a partial stock listing. JBS has grown through a series of acquisitions, spending $20 billion in the past decade. Recent investigations into the bribing of Brazilian meat inspectors to overlook food safety violations are now spooking foreign customers and threatening to derail JBS's stock offering.

Fury Road: Did Uber Steal the Driverless Future From Google?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Uber is not winning any public relations awards these days nor is its CEO, Travis Kalanick, known for people skills. The legal battle between Uber and Google over driverless technology reveals a lot about both companies, including leadership issues, corporate culture, and business ethics.

Training Day

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

KentuckianaWorks trains young adults and displaced blue-collar workers with sought-after advanced manufacturing skills. Its success illustrates the relationship between human resource management, education, and training. It also illustrates the shared needs of workers, employers, and society.

Fury Road: Did Uber Steal the Driverless Future From Google?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google and Uber, both seen as exemplary entrepreneurial success stories, are now embroiled in a battle to become the dominant design in the driverless car technology field. The stakes are high in this market, projected by both companies to be in the hundreds of billions, or even the trillion, dollar range. The two are dealing with failures and limited success, but they have too much invested to quit now.

Now on EBay: Russian Micro-Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Small firms are using EBay to reach markets across borders. In Europe, sellers can now sign up to have items listed in multiple countries and have the descriptions translated into local languages. For EBay, more than half the company's revenue now comes from international markets.

$400 Million Richer By Pinching Pennies

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The online grocery delivery startup, Instacart Inc., is looking to pinch pennies, starting with bottle deposit fees. It's working to increase ad revenue as it tries to prove it’s the exception in a field of delivery-app failures.

For Diabetics, the Power of Knowing

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Users of a new type of glucose meter scanned themselves as many as forty-five times a day. Diabetics using a new meter took readings more frequently — about sixteen times a day — and did better at lowering glucose levels.

India's War Over Water — and Soft Drinks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Retailers in several areas of India have decided to pull Coke and Pepsi products from their shelves. Behind this boycott is a combination of nationalism, support for small farmers who need water for irrigation, and concern over water quality and shortages. Coke and Pepsi are perceived as "foreign" firms that are making money off from a valuable national natural resource: water.

General Motors: A Continental Retreat

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After pulling Chevrolet out of Europe in 2013, prospects for General Motors there have not improved. Now GM has agreed to pay French automaker PSA Group to take Opel and Vauxhall Motors as it exits Europe.

These Are the 50 Most Promising Startups You've Never Heard of

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With an initial list of around 50,000, market researcher Quid used an algorithm including prior leadership team experience, time between rounds of financing, education of founding team members, and more subjective issues such as attractiveness of industry.

Toto, I’ve a Feeling We’re Still in Kansas (or Missouri)

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google brought its high-speed internet to Kansas City, but it did not turn the city into a tech paradise. Google overestimated Fiber's impact, and its expansion plans deflated.

Purple Drank, Corporate Bank

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Purple drank, a concoction of soda and promethazine codeine cough syrup that is used as a recreational drug, was popularized by hip-hop artists. The pharmaceutical companies that make the cough syrup may be profiting from the recreational use of their products. Could these companies take more deliberate steps to curtail the illegal use of their products?

Selling China on Cheese

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign dairy companies have found it difficult to enter the Chinese consumer market with milk, butter, cheese, and other dairy products. The food-service industry, however, which supplies restaurants and cafeterias, appears to be easier to enter while having lower margins. In order to encourage Chinese chefs to use more dairy products in their cooking, foreign dairy companies are holding workshops and investing in training kitchens to help introduce dairy products to Chinese chefs.

Uber’s Taxicab Confessions

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Uber was a pioneer in the development of the modern sharing economy. In recent months, however, it seems to be facing both legal and public relations challenges. This spate of incidents is putting Uber's leadership, corporate culture, and business practices under a spotlight.

Fun Filters Don’t Make Good Neighbors

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Snap Inc. has been acquiring the limited supply of commercial and residential real estate and parking for its headquarters in Venice, CA. A disappearing bee colony becomes a symbol for the IPO-fueled growth locals fear will swamp the quirky Los Angeles neighborhood the startup calls home.

How Much Is an Instagram Story Worth?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In building a travel advertising and marketing business, the traditional hotel photo shoot is a thing of the past. Beautiful Destinations has been averaging 5 million views per Story since Instagram rolled out the Snapchat-like feature in August.

Samsung's New Board Gets Back to Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Large family-dominated conglomerates, called chaebol, have significant influence in Korean business. The nine largest companies in South Korea are responsible for 75 percent of the country's gross domestic product and have significant influence over government policies. A bribery investigation that implicates both the country's president and the leader of Samsung has led to renewed calls for reform of these highly successful conglomerates.

The Greatest Generation Is Now Around the Corner

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

5G will be great for streaming video but will also enable a new world of connected cars, drones, and robots. The future cellular networks will generate $3.5 trillion in economic output.

How to Lose $6 Billion

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nuclear power looked like a promising business when Toshiba acquired Westinghouse Electric in 2006. Now cost overruns and delays at the only nuclear plants under construction in the United States since 1979 will cripple, if not bankrupt, the once formidable industrial conglomerate.

Dirty Deeds Hidden In a Mess of Data

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) depends on Congress for funding; as a result, the regulator is chronically short of resources it needs to enforce regulations related to derivatives and other complex financial instruments. While the CFTC collects mountains of data, the agency can't afford the technology resources needed to analyze it. Nevertheless, the CFTC has taken some notable enforcement actions and is working with private analytics companies to spot illegal trading maneuvers and enhance enforcement.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. agriculture industry depends heavily on exports, with more than half of U.S. wheat, rice, cotton, and soybean production traded overseas. Uncertainty over Trump’s farm policy, along with his administration’s clear signals to scuttle multilateral trade agreements, could be good news for farmers in Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. With Trump pulling out of the Trans Pacific Partnership on trade, which was backed by farmers, countries that remain in the partnership may have preferential access to important markets.

Innovation: Needle Camera

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Using a tiny camera at the end of an elongated needle, the Mi-eye2, the only product of Trice Medical, can enter into an injured joint and provide superior visual information about the type and extent of the injury. This allows the proper type of treatment to be determined without the degree of risk of orthoscopic units as well as the superior imaging than MRIs can provide.

The Master Chides His Students

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Warren Buffett convinced many investors that the market can be beaten, but he’s a big fan of index funds. Awkward. He picks a bone with stockpickers.

Survival of the Fitted

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Data mining by traditional brick-and-mortar fashion retailers is not a new thing, but third party data tracking in the internet era is creating advantageous data that can lead to better targeting. Le Tote, a fashion rental service that uses products from such traditional retailers as the French Connection, collects data on the level of satisfaction of their customers (who pay a fee for their service) and now partners with the retailers to help meet the needs of consumers in a tailor-made way.

Big Meat Braces for a Labor Shortage

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants are not the most enjoyable places to work, and while the pay typically exceeds minimum wage, employers have a hard time attracting and keeping employees. In order to keep operations running and meat prices at levels customers have come to expect, plants have increasingly turned to immigrant and/or refugee labor. With the recently announced travel and refugee ban, many workers that had hoped to build a life in America and bring their families to join them, now wonder if they can ever achieve the American Dream, and meat processing plants wonder if they will be able to find enough workers to fill the jobs.

"Hollywood"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. and Chinese film industries have become increasingly interdependent, with big U.S. studios counting on Chinese financing and ticket sales. Last year the Chinese market generated 19 percent of global box office sales and had higher revenues than U.S. theaters for some films. In addition, Chinese firms have made major investments in U.S. movie theaters and film studios.

The End of Terrible Wi-Fi May Be Near

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Consumers have been frustrated with slow Wi-Fi issues, particularly in the home. With gaming, appliances, and information-oriented products vying for access, it has been a frustrating constraint for service providers such as Comcast. Innovative new firms have begun to incrementally improve this environment and seem to be establishing a great deal of value by doing so.

Maybe a Good Manager Can't Run Everything

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kevin Turner spent 11 years as Microsoft's chief operating officer, but he only lasted seven months as chief executive officer at Citadel Securities. Although Turner had a track record of success in both retail and technology companies, his experience at Citadel illustrates that there is not a one-size-fits-all leadership style that guarantees success in any context.

Apple, Microsoft Borrow Now Instead of Waiting for Tax Shift

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

This year, tax reform could give U.S. companies access to hundreds of billions of dollars they have stashed overseas. But uncertainty about if or when any tax reform will take effect, and what the reforms will be, means that borrowing is still the best bet for many companies.

The Trump-Valley Fight Starts to Take Shape

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

President Donald Trump's executive order draft discusses overhauling work-visa programs. The Trump administration has drafted an executive order that would limit tech hiring of foreign workers. These reforms could impact how tech companies recruit employees.

How Fancy Private Bankers Cross-Sell

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ex-employees of JPMorgan describe the push to sell the bank's own products to rich clients. A review of company filings and transcripts of investor calls indicates that JPMorgan has been the only big bank to break out revenue figures tied to cross-selling. JPMorgan says that its in-house options serve both bank and client.

Good Deals Make Good Neighbors

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The political relationships between countries in the Middle East are complicated, with history, religion, and territorial disputes causing many impediments to cooperation. While Israeli diplomats may have difficulty working with counterparts from Arab countries, that doesn't keep Israeli businesses from doing business with Arab governments. The logistics of keeping these business relationships obscured, however, can be challenging.

Can Sneaker Makers Come Home Again?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The manufacturing of sneakers has been a labor-intensive process, and thus, much of the manufacturing has taken place in low-wage nations. With changes in design and new manufacturing techniques, it may be economic to move some production closer to markets. This will reduce shipping costs, while shortening the time to market and making it easier for manufacturers to quickly respond to shifting demand.

Snapchat Can’t Keep it Private

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Snap’s culture of secrecy may be consistent with the ethos of its original Snapchat app and its CEO’s leadership style, but it may not be helping the company's IPO plans. Snap’s upcoming IPO is testing this culture. If Snap remains unwilling to provide information about its vision and strategy, it runs the risk that investors may shy away from the IPO.

Student Loans

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Navient's student loan advice may have left borrowers confused — and poorer. Recently filed government lawsuits allege that, in an attempt to minimize its costs, Navient put some distressed borrowers in more debt by steering them into plans that put off payments and ballooned their balances and interest costs instead of recommending income-based repayment programs that are more expensive to administer. Regulators estimate that households’ debt burden may have been inflated by billions of dollars.

IBM's Big Jobs Dodge

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Seemingly motivated by Donald Trump’s public vows to punish companies that send jobs overseas, IBM’s CEO has pledged to hire 25,000 U.S. workers in coming years. IBM’s actions, including multiple rounds of U.S. firings in 2016, raise questions about just how genuine the company’s pledge is. Despite becoming more savvy in the way it conducts its U.S. workforce reductions, IBM continues to fire U.S. employees and replace many with overseas workers.

How Uber and Airbnb Fought City Halls and Figured Out the Sharing Economy

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Airbnb and Uber are two relatively young companies that have had to overcome strong institutional barriers to entry but have managed to do so by garnering support from their customers and their partners to establish a strong position in their respective markets. What crucial battles were necessary for their founders to win and realize their dreams?

IBM’s Big Jobs Dodge

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While IBM talks about Trump-pleasing hiring plans, it's firing thousands. IBM pledged to hire 25,000 workers over four years, but it's continuing to fire American workers and move their jobs abroad. It wasn't long before employees were accusing the company's CEO of hypocrisy.

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Pharma's Worst Nightmare

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Celebration of Trump’s victory by pharmaceutical executives turned to fear when he suggested they should bid for the government’s business as well as bring manufacturing back to the U.S. But Trump will have to overcome the powerful pharmaceutical lobby to get such measures through the Republican Congress.

How to Make a €367 Million Loss Disappear

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In recent years, there has been no shortage of scandals in the banking industry. Deutsche Bank has been implicated in a number of the scandals involving tax evasion, mortgage securities, and even manipulation of LIBOR. Perhaps the biggest scandal, though, was Deutsche Bank’s involvement in investment banking, the evolution of its culture, and the details of another scandalous transaction designed to obfuscate a client’s losses.

Innovation: Pocket DSLR

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There has remained an industry of Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras whose sole purpose is high resolution photography. While mobile devices such as phones have improved their resolution, there were barriers in place that kept them from attaining parity with the DSLR format. Rajiv Laroia, a cofounder of Light, has developed a method by which the barrier has been drastically altered and the quality of photos taken with a phone sized unit can closer approximate the performance of stand alone cameras.

In the Land of the Blind Hire

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Challenged to publicly disclose the percentage of female software engineers, many technology companies disclosed their decidedly lopsided diversity statistics and established public diversity goals. While some have made progress, meeting these goals is proving challenging. Nevertheless, disclosure and pressure to meet public goals may be making a difference in motivating change

Holding Down the Costs of the Cloud

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Analytics startups help manage companies’ server needs. About 1 in 5 businesses that rent computing capacity through the cloud now use specialized software to keep better tabs on costs. Companies such as Cloudability, CloudHealth, Cloudyn and Cloud Cruiser do face two serious risks.

When a Facebook Page Matters to Facebook

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mark Zuckerberg’s image in the digital domain needs to be controlled. There are more than a dozen Facebook employees writing Mark Zuckerberg’s posts or scouring the comments for spammers and trolls.

In Brazil, It's Now Beer—Without the Babes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brazil is an important market in the worldwide beer industry, and this is the season for summertime beer ads. Compared to other years, however, the ads are a little more tame and less sexy. While this may be partly related to changing advertising norms, it also reflects the increasing importance of women as customers.

The Latest Shortage: Fast-Food Workers

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A falling unemployment rate is contributing to rising wages for workers at fast-food restaurants and discount stores. Many fast-food restaurants are finding that they need to work harder to keep employees, including paying higher wages and providing better benefits. Some managers are also finding that it is more important to pay attention to employees, including knowing their names and making them feel valued and important.

Unionize Me

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The on-demand economy is changing consumer behaviors and business models. It is also creating challenges for classifying workers as employees versus independent contractors. Uber and other well-known enterprises continue to grapple with this issue, but Handy, a less well-known startup, is proposing legislation that could create a compromise offering workers limited benefits without full employee rights.

When a Startup Means a Fresh Start

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It is difficult for ex-convicts to get solid jobs after they have served their time. Defy Ventures, a nonprofit started by Catherine Hoke, believes that one way for them to find jobs is to start their own company. Using money and expertise from some of the largest tech-industry experts, Defy Ventures provides training while the inmates are finishing up their sentences. Their ideas are then considered for funding, and thus far, more than 150 have received support for their startups. Most importantly, their recidivism rate is 3 percent. This is dramatically lower than the normal rates.

TFW Your Country’s Shredding Money and You Own a Payment App

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fintech upstart Paytm is leveraging an anti-corruption campaign to establish itself as India's dominant digital payments player. It wants to be India's first $100 billion company by value.

When Bad Things Happen to Good Funds

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Interestingly, a strong long-term mutual fund performance record is not enough to hold on to investors. A long-term shift from active to passive funds affects even managers with outstanding records.

Netflix Presents: Building a World of Binge-Watchers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Netflix has been gradually building a subscriber base in Central and South America. A key step in attracting customers to its subscription video service was to help develop the infrastructure that facilitated high-speed streaming. Netflix has also developed original content specifically for South American consumers.

Innovation: Drone-Catching Drone

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A drone to stifle other drones by capturing them in a net. How much of a market is there, and how long will it last?

The World Is Not Enough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Emirates has grown from a two-plane operation to being the world's largest long-haul airline. Using the natural location advantage of Dubai as a hub, the airline can efficiently serve many routes between South Asia, Africa, and Europe. Its continued growth, however, may be limited by both demand conditions and concerns over unfair advantages it receives as a result of government ownership.

The World Is Not Enough

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Emirates Airline has a corporate culture and human resource management policies that reflect the government that owns it. With the support of Dubai's government, Emirates carefully controls employees and many dimensions of the enterprise. Aggressive expansion has made Emirates Airline the world's largest long-haul carrier, but some question the sustainability of the company, its business strategy, and the multilateral world without borders philosophy that underpins the company.

Who's Gonna Buy All These Audis in China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Chinese auto industry has been growing steadily for 26 years, with foreign luxury brands such as Audi doing very well. The market is shifting, however, as other luxury brands such as Mercedes are experiencing faster growth. Meanwhile, there is also pressure for more fuel-efficient, electric, and hybrid vehicles. Thus, Audi dealers are finding it hard to make a profit, while Audi seeks out additional sales channels to spur growth.

Make All Rent Checks Payable to: Wall Street

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Private equity firms snapped up homes after the real estate bust. Wall Street, America's new landlord, kicks tenants to the curb.

The World Is Not Enough

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Emirates flies the fanciest product on the biggest planes on the longest routes. There might not be much more room to soar. The proliferation of lighter, fuel-efficient jets such as the Boeing 787 are making long-haul routes between smaller cities economical, reducing the role for megahubs and the superconnector model such as Dubai World Central.

Greening Business, One Project at a Time

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Generate Capital, a startup venture fund specializing in green infrastructure projects, has obtained $500 million in investor funds to foster new green technologies and facilitate their adoption into mainstream use. Jigar Shah, founder of SunEdison, started Generate Capital with a couple of McKinsey consultants under the notion that the $1 Trillion market would not be a few huge players, but many smaller players that gain market access and proof of design and value.

When the Teacher Is An Ocean Away

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

From her own experience as a high school student, Cindy Mi realized that teachers can have a huge influence, good and bad, on a student's attitude and success. She worked for a time at her uncle's school doing tutoring before starting her own company. Recognizing the desire of Chinese parents to have the best education possible for the child, including English language instruction, and the relatively low pay of teachers in North America, she started a company for online tutoring that pairs Chinese youth with North American teachers.

Guess Which Huge Asian Country Is Afraid of Capital Flight?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China has been encouraging companies to “Go Abroad” in recent years and make acquisitions to obtain access to markets, technology, and brand names. In the first 10 months of 2016, Chinese companies spent almost $150 billion on foreign investments. There are now indications that China is starting to tighten capital controls, and scrutinize outward investment more carefully.

China Gets Serious About Shrinking Steel

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China is the world's leading steel exporter, and in the process has driven down worldwide steel prices. The Chinese government is now trying to restructure its domestic steel industry, closing smaller producers. This should help the country reduce air pollution while giving some financial relief to other steel makers.

Cloud Armor That's Not Quite So Fluffy

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Storing data on "the cloud" cheaply is an enticing proposition for those with huge storage needs, but security of that data is becoming a focus of attention for IT professionals. A company started in 2007 named Guardtime has begun to sell security software that can detect breaches of data security. They started in Estonia, one of the first countries to place an emphasis on e-government and systems.

The Same Gold Watch, It Just Arrives Later

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With more than 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 each day, more businesses are using phased retirements to bridge a talent gap. Although most arrangements involve individual negotiation, the phased retirement approach is turning out to be a win-win for employers and workers. Businesses are keeping workers with valuable skills who can help train younger workers, and retirees can enjoy a less abrupt transition into retirement.

So Let's Talk About That Seafood Platter

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The global supply chain that brings shrimp and fish to your neighborhood restaurant or grocery store can be very opaque. For centuries, aquaculture has been a part of the Chinese food supply, and the Chinese seafood industry has grown to become one of the largest producers and exporters in the world. Concerns over the use of antibiotics and the safety of the food has raised concerns among Western regulators, causing Chinese firms to use transshipment techniques to avoid certain tariffs and import inspections.

China Challenges the Giants With Low Fares

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's state-owned airlines are adding international routes and gaining marketshare from international competitors. Part of the reason behind their success is price-based competition that allows customers to save hundreds of dollars compared to other large international competitors. But the growth is also attributable to an increasing number of Chinese customers who may favor domestic over foreign carriers.

Can Lemonade Lure Insurance Skeptics?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Two tech entrepreneurs have launched a property insurance startup called Lemonade, seeing insurance as a huge industry that's been "unspoiled by innovation." Behavioral economics professor Dan Ariely helped them reimagine what home insurance could be and come up with a business model that changes the incentives on both sides.

J&J Plays the Spurned Suitor

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite a more than $27 billion bid, Actelion Ltd.'s founders want to stay put. "It's not a question of money," says CEO Jean-Paul Clozel. "We have enough money."

Where a Graying Herd Still Thunders

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Regulatory changes and technological advances have led to major reductions in the number of trading and investment banking jobs; the biggest global firms have shed almost 10,000 of these jobs in the past five years. Experienced brokers and traders have lost their jobs, and many have struggled to find job opportunities in finance. TJM Institutional Services, however, has taken advantage of the flood of talent on the job market and is growing its business by finding a way to monetize the experience of these industry veterans.

Apple Is Bringing Drones to a Map Fight

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple Inc. has received Federal Aviation Administration approval to use drones for data collection to improve its Maps service. Apple acquired startup Indoor.io last year to help bring its indoor mapping project to market.

The Great Indian Tax Dodge of 2016

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Planeloads of cash seek to turn India's black money white. Winning support for demonetization and implementing it effectively is crucial for Prime Minister Narendra Modi before key state elections next year and a national poll in 2019.

Europe's Big Airlines Struggle for Altitude

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The European airline industry has been undergoing consolidation, much like that in the United States. And just like in the Unites States, European airlines face stiff competition from low-cost, no-frills carriers. But what remains different is that the large airline groups still operate multiple brands, and with state ownership interests, it is difficult for these airlines to achieve the cost savings of their North American counterparts.

Hulu Reboots for a Post-Cable Age

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For owners Comcast, Fox, Disney, and Time Warner, the Internet streaming service Hulu has been their beachhead in the increasingly popular world of video streaming. Now Hulu plans to offer live TV to strengthen its position against leaders Netflix and Amazon but may simultaneously continue to erode their owners’ cable TV businesses.

Stalking the Next Zuckerberg

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By combining the logic of Peter Thiel's foundation, which eschews formal higher education, with the idea that there are some college students who are potential entrepreneurs and who have an entrepreneurial spirit, Danielle Strachman and Mike Gibson have ventured out with their own venture called the 1517 Fund. With funding from Peter Thiel and other highly successful entrepreneurs, the fund now offers gifts, loans, and access to a network of successful entrepreneurs who hope to regain their investments through connections with entrepreneurs heading up early stage ventures.

Breitbart Advertisers Take Political Fire, Too

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A growing list of advertisers have decided to pull advertising from Breitbart's website, arguing that its publication of anti-immigrant, anti-women, and anti-muslim articles is inconsistent with their company values. In response to Kellogg's decision to pull its ads, Breitbart responded by asking its readers to boycott Kellogg's products. But since many companies use advertising agencies and third-party Internet placement firms to distribute their ads, it can be hard for advertisers to control where their ads show up.

The New Advertising, As Seen on TV

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Facebook, the Internet’s No. 2 ad business, has a growth problem. The social media company is working with A&E and a streaming startup to tailor more conventional commercials for viewers.

Namaste. Now Try My Herbal Toothpaste.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Global personal care product companies such as Unilever and Colgate-Palmolive have started to see their market share in India decline, as local firms offering natural ayurvedic products grab market share. Focusing on all-natural ingredients, and using marketing based on yoga-gurus and an emphasis on balance in life, firms such as Patanjali have continued to gain market share. Patanjali has grown to hold more than 1 percent of India's market, with its principal owner now worth about $2.5 billion. More local competition is entering the market, and the large conglomerates are starting their own lines of ayurvedic products.

The New Advertising As Seen on TV

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Video ads on Facebook are here. The company is testing you.

Secret Formula

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A unique management formula may be why Inditex’s revenue growth—up 11 percent in the first half of 2016—far outpaces its rivals. The biggest fashion retailer is thriving as rivals falter. It has virtually no ad budget apart from social media marketing.

Pet Food That Comes With an Oil Painting

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chewy, a pet supply store that specializes in creating a superior customer service experience online by sparing no expense, has developed into an $880 million revenue company. Unfortunately, its expenses have exceeded its revenue, but the company has solid financial backing and dreams of becoming even larger.

Secret Formula

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As competitors struggle, Zara continues to thrive. It's known as a fast-fashion company supported with a supply chain that allows quick turnarounds. Some facets of Zara’s business model may be imitable, but its approach to management, unique decision-making process, and organizational culture may be able to sustain the company's success.

"I mean, is there anti-murder training?"

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For decades, U.S. companies have addressed sexual harassment in the workplace with corporate policies, awareness programs, and compliance training. Nevertheless, data from the EEOC and other sources indicate that sexual harassment remains prevalent, raising questions about the efficacy of corporate policies and HR training in addressing more than corporate liability. Related content describing the personal experiences of nine women, research about why so many women wait to come forward, and podcasts on the Bloomberg Businessweek website help illustrate the impact and complexities that surround this pervasive workplace issue.

Secret Formula

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Inditex's business model for fast fashion allows it to frequently update its inventory and adapt its offerings to different tastes in different countries. Rather than rely on lead designers to try and predict or create fashion trends, the company uses data and a team of designers to continually shift production at its factories. Since a large portion is produced near the Inditex's headquarters in Spain, new designs can move quickly into production and onto store shelves in Europe.

The Real Cost of an MBA

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To figure out the true price of a business degree, you have to factor in the opportunity cost. Unfortunately the formula is not perfect (e.g., it does not factor in financial aid or scholarships).

Carmakers Could Hit That Wall, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The North American automotive industry is highly integrated across Canada, the U.S., and Mexico, with parts and vehicles flowing back and forth across borders. All that could change if Donald Trump follows through on his threats to levy import taxes and cut trade with Canada and Mexico. The implications for automakers from Ford to Toyota to Volkswagen are significant, as are the resultant rise in prices of that U.S. consumers would face.

Clean Power Is Too Hot For Even Trump to Cool

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investments in clean power by major U.S. corporations are expected to increase in pace despite the election of climate change denier Donald Trump. The business case for renewables is positive despite threats to reverse Obama’s commitments to the Paris climate accord and the Clean Power Plan.

America's Got No Talent

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The semi-unanticipated results of the past Presidential election have sent shock waves through the political/economic sectors that did not have a favorable outcome. One such area is that of technology sectors focused in Silicon Valley. The availability of talent from Asian countries is perceived to be in jeopardy. Will this create a international competitive disadvantage for the United States?

America's Got No Talent

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. tech companies are facing new challenges in recruiting talent due to uncertainty about future U.S. immigration policies following the election of Donald Trump. Xenophobia may make the U.S. less attractive to new immigrants. Some foreign-born tech workers who are already working in the U.S. are putting plans on hold; others are planning to leave the U.S.

Clean Power is Too Hot For Even Trump to Cool

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Regardless of policy changes that may take place under a Trump presidency, investment in sustainability and renewable energy may continue. Less commitment to renewable energy at the federal level could even spur corporations to play a stronger role. Corporate long-term energy purchase agreements are emerging as a way to finance clean-power projects. One example is Microsoft's recent agreement to purchase electricity produced by wind power to run data centers in Wyoming.

Microsoft Isn't Feeling Any Russian Thaw

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As a matter of national security, Russia is trying to develop more home-grown software and applications. It is also requiring that Russian consumers' data be stored on servers in Russia. For U.S. technology-based firms such as Google and Microsoft, not only can this mean lost revenue, it also contributes to the development of new competitors.

Engineering the Sound of Silence at Porsche

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Porsche plans to have a high powered all-electric coupe out by 2019, just in time for the EU’s tough new carbon emission standards for 2020. Porsche’s Mission E will also growl like a Porsche.

Instagram Tries to Ease Users Into Shopping

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Instagram is testing whether letting brands tag photos with links will succeed where other social media marketing has failed. It is part of its broader strategy for helping people pick out and buy things.

Want Fries with that Kale Salad?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fast-food chains are shelling out millions to purge preservatives, artificial ingredients, and other unmentionables. Skeptics question health claims.

Boring Funds Get Weird

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pension fund portfolios are not as boring as they once were. Near zero yields on government bonds are increasing the funding gap for European pension funds and driving investment in alternative assets. These unusual investments include British bingo halls and real estate in Amsterdam’s red-light district. Yields are higher with alternative assets, but it may be disconcerting for pensioners to realize that their retirement funds are invested in enterprises that many might consider unseemly.

Innovation: Gryphon Router

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With so many smart devices being routed wirelessly in our homes and businesses, they have become a prime target for cyberattacks. John Wu, a veteran in the W-Fi arena at the age of forty-two, has come up with a router that can stop attacks at the entry level, thereby protecting the devices.

We Found Your Last Smartphone, Next to Your Old VCR

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although many communities, electronics manufacturers, and retailers have programs to recycle old electronic gear, a great deal of e-waste ends up in places such as the neighborhood of Renovacion in Mexico City. There devices are manually and mechanically taken apart to get at bits of precious metals that can be harvested, melted down, and resold. The work pays well, but there are potentially significant health risks to workers and residents.

China's High-End Retail Emporium

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Over the past two years, Walmart has repositioned the 14 Sam's Club stores in China to offer more expensive products. The focus is on "aspirational customers," or those who want to show off their wealth. Flat-screen TVs, BMWs and fine wines are on display.

Maybe the Flash Boys Are the Good Guys

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Villains or heroes? High-speed traders have been accused of profiting at the expense of individual investors and society, with "Flash Boys" not helping their reputation. Like many complex issues, however, this may not be as one-sided as once thought, and recent academic research suggests that high-speed trading may have benefits. The issue of conflicts of interest is still a concern.

Innovation 3D-Printing Recycler

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

University of British Columbia students wasted a lot of plastic while making prototypes for robotics classes but addressed this problem by developing the ProtoCycler, a desktop machine that converts plastic waste into 3D-printer filament. While this is good for the environment, the recycled filament may also have a cost advantage over premade filament.

Home Is Where The Data Is

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The ability to store huge troves of data in the public cloud has created a burgeoning industry, but now, some companies are starting to want some degree of separation from the risks of public cloud storage. To that end, a sector called private cloud storage has found root as a sub-industry.

The Prenup That Didn't Stick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

NTT Docomo is trying to exercise a clause in its joint venture agreement with Tata Group that would allow NTT Docomo to exit the joint venture with at least half of its original investment. It has even received a court ruling in support of this, and Tata has agreed to make the payment. India’s central bank, however, has blocked the payment, leaving the joint venture and both parties in legal limbo.

In Case of Low Revenue

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Twitter's "Firehose" of a half billion tweets a day is incredibly valuable — and just as dangerous. Find out how despots use Twitter to hunt dissidents.

What Do We Want? Uber Union

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Uber has unveiled the Independent Drivers Guild (IDG) to address driver concerns and pressure for unionization. Uber's partner behind the IDG has agreed not to seek unionization, at least until 2021.

What Do We Want? Uber Union

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Uber is funding an Independent Drivers Guild for drivers. While this quasi union is providing benefits to Uber drivers, it has also promised not to strike.

Innovation Fighting Hearing Loss

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Bloomberg Businessweek article "Innovation Fighting Hearing Loss" (October 31−November 6, 2016) assesses several potential solutions seeking to resolve hearing loss in patients.

A New Leader in the Suborbital Space Race

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Two of the top names in entrepreneurship have squared off in the suborbital space race. Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson are competing to become both the first and the best in suborbital tourism, which will carry a hefty price tag for early travelers. Recent successes have given Bezos a slight lead.

A Gold Rush in Mexico's Deadly South

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Mexico's Guerrero state, signs of a gold rush are emerging.

The Toll of Cheap Clothing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Following the April 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh, multinational companies and the government are trying to improve factory working conditions.

Rooftop Solar Clouds Up

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After five years of rapid growth, solar rooftop installations are expected to be flat overall this year, while declining in some markets. Bloomberg New Energy Finance predicts that growth will resume and says a year or two of stagnation is “an overwhelmingly positive outcome.”

Sustainable Cotton

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cotton is a natural fiber, but its production has involved so much pesticide and water use that it is considered one of the world's dirtiest crops. Retailers, garment makers, and farmers have formed the Better Cotton Initiative to develop more sustainable produced cotton. "Better Cotton" may not meet the environmental standards of organic cotton, however it balances sustainability with a cost and is gaining a growing market share.

The Cheap Phone Is Dead In China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's domestic smartphone makers are gaining worldwide market share. While the growth of Apple and Samsung in worldwide markets has slowed, Vivo, Oppo, TCL and Xiaomi are all growing. These companies are not just counting on growing sales in China, however, but also have their sites set on India and other growing markets.

What’s In Your Wallet

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A growing number of retailers look to strengthen ties with customers by combining convenient payment and rewards. Mobile wallets are the new loyalty program.

Bulls on Parole

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A program under development by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services may offer a reprieve for foreign-born startup founders and their employees. It’s not a startup visa, but it’s close.

Euro Trip To Hell

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The European Union has put the brakes on a number of U.S.-based technology companies this year. Apple has been informed that it owes over $14 billion to the Irish government due to a sweetheart tax deal, and other governments are also looking into whether this tax deal meant that the company did not pay appropriate taxes in their countries. Google has also faced a number of inquiries into its business model, with different countries having slightly different regulations that limit the services it can offer.

The Slow-Motion Bust

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While the U.S. investment market appears to have found a little stability in level, the uncertainty about the quality of the entrepreneurial endeavors has brought a new level of risk expectations into the market and this makes the probability of a downturn amp up. It is noteworthy that there are huge caches of cash that have been raised to fund new ventures, however, the risk profile of these investments appear to contain potential for loss context.

Packaging Salmon Jerky for the Masses

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Anne French, president of Dear North, a collaborative effort between Huna Totem (a Native Alaskan-owned company focused on tourism) and Ammunition (a company known for designing Beats, the popular headphones), dreamed of exporting consumer products that captured the Alaskan allure. The company has begun producing first product: salmon jerky. It aims to sell to the Lower 48 states, be in 700 outlets by the end of the year, and earn $1 million in its first year.

Monetizing Lost Vacation Time

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Workaholic Americans accumulate hundreds of hours of unused leave. Recognizing this issue, a startup company hopes to redefine the vacation-leave benefit. PTO Exchange is building a business that provides innovative options for unlocking the value of employees’ unused vacation time.

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine's Agriculture

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A good climate and great soil has contributed to the success of Ukrainian farmers in the global food market. Current projections suggest that Ukraine will rise to third place in world agricultural production, following United States and Brazil. But outdated technology and uncertain land use regulations are holding back some of the capital investment required to expand agricultural production in Ukraine.

The Short Flight From Clerk to Cockpit

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

JetBlue attracted 1,480 applicants for 24 positions in its innovative pilot training program that requires no flight experience. Participants pay $125,000 for the training but have a job with JetBlue waiting upon completion of the program. The program offers advantages, but there may be human resource risks, since JetBlue's pilot union does not support the program.

Look Familiar?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's new high-end Pixel smartphones will compete directly with Apple's iPhone, but also with Samsung and HTC and the rest of Google's Android partners. Google says it will treat its new hardware division just like the other Android partners and is confident it can keep it all together.

Google Has Its Own Phones. Now It Needs New Retail Strategy

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some wireless carriers are wary of Google's retail ability. Google sees software as its edge, rather than retail distribution and customer service.

Out-Ubering Uber

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

At the time Cheng Wei and colleagues were starting the Didi ride-hailing service in China, they faced a number of domestic competitors. Their model, unlike Uber, was based on the U.K.'s Hailo. After beating out their Chinese competitors, they recently reached an agreement with Uber.

Do As I Say, Not What I'm Accused of

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The purchase of Autonomy by Hewlett-Packard (HP) was a boon for co-founder Mike Lynch, but a boondoggle for HP. It has bred animosity and lawsuits between the participants. Lynch is not awaiting the results of these matters; he has used his wealth to create a new venture capital fund that both supplies money and borrows talent from his Autonomy management cohort to bring the incubated firms up to speed rapidly.

This Deflation Has Grocers Fed Up

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Initiated by lower costs due to lower grain and oil prices, food prices have been falling for nine straight months. But food retailers seem to be engaged in a price war of cutthroat competition and irrational pricing.

A Different Kind of Apple a Day

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It was bound to happen, and it was likely that Apple would be one of the pioneers. Attaching collection and connectivity to health data as a repository for tracking patient conditions is now becoming a real possibility, with the company leading the charge.

Welcome to Pride Night

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Professional sports leagues and individual teams are taking steps to create a more inclusive environment for fans and athletes. These include hosting pride nights and LGBT events. The outreach is at least partially motivated by the purchasing power of LGBT fans, but it also involves a potentially challenging cultural and image change for professional sports. Thus far, there is evidence of increased ticket sales as well as push-back and hostility.

How Adidas Got Back in the Game

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Adidas's stock price is seeing a nice rise as the company picks up market share and sponsorship agreements. Part of the rise is fueled by a greater emphasis on fashion, including limited edition shoes. Adidas is also working with music entertainers to have them "design" shoes for the company.

This Deflation Has Grocers Fed Up

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Food, on average, makes up only about 15 percent of a consumer’s budget. Walmart effect combines with deflation to eat away at margins. Grocery stores are trying to compete on price through digital coupons and promotions.

EBay Tries to Push Past Its Tag-Sale Roots

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the upscale Australian department store chain Myer, EBay created a Virtual Reality Department Store, giving away 20,000 "shopticals" that let shoppers browse merchandise via augmented reality. Differentiating EBay from Amazon is the centerpiece of CEO Devin Wenig’s strategy.

The Short Arm of the Claw

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The banking scandal related to the creation of 2 million unauthorized Wells Fargo accounts is raising questions about how to prevent executives from profiting from fraudulent activity. Clawback policies can allow compensation that has already been paid to be recovered after misconduct is discovered, but effective implementation is often too difficult and expensive to be practical. Deferred compensation structures offer some promise, but full financial accountability for executives remains elusive.

Fierce Culture Drives Tencent’s Success

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although Tencent Holdings is now one of China’s largest public companies, it maintains a start-up mentality and uses internal competition to spur innovation. Employees at all levels compete against each other to win funding for projects. In this competitive culture, ideas often come from the bottom up, and the company’s executives actively engage with rank and file employees.

The Foxconn of the Auto Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Any company considering entry into the auto industry will likely be in contact with Magna International. Magna makes a variety of components that go into most autos, and operates assembly lines that produce cars for certain auto companies. It is currently exploring how it might create a platform that companies considering entering the auto industry could use as the basis for their vehicles.

Using DNA Markers To Spot Bogus Fabrics

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While difficult to fully ascertain once in the product, Egyptian cotton commands a premium price in the fabric markets. Media stories of fake goods sold claiming this expensive fabric but really using less expensive and inferior cotton have given consumer confidence a negative hit. Using DNA testing technology, it is now possible to validate samples to alleviate the concerns. A small company operating from a business incubator in New York is specializing in this process.

Using DNA Markers To Spot Bogus Fabrics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Egyptian cotton is known for its long fibers that help make fabric particularly smooth and comfortable. Many retailers and brand name designers proudly label their bedding as being made with Egyptian cotton. Unfortunately, given the small scale of the Egyptian cotton production, it is simply mathematically impossible for all the bedding labeled as Egyptian cotton to actually have come from Egyptian cotton. As cotton goes through the various stages of production, it is common for cheaper varieties to be used. Now steps are being taken by retailers and designers to have the cotton they purchase be marked, and then subsequently tested, to make sure they are ending up with fabric that uses the cotton they paid for.

Flipping’s Back…With Crowdfunding

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

House flippers turn to the crowd for quick cash. What could go wrong? Wall Street is not as interested in financing single-family developments in smaller and medium-sized deals, making crowdfunding a better way to fund such projects.

Black Workers Still Make Less Than Whites With the Same Degree

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Intel's chief diversity and inclusion officer describes a variety of challenges in diversifying the company's workforce. She explains that challenges in hiring are different than those of retention. Intel is introducing programs that address individual needs and also yield data that can help the company design systemic solutions.

Singapore’s Rough Week for Shipping Foreshadows Challenging 2017

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Singapore's shipping and logistics companies face a record $1.8 billion in bond maturities. Container throughput shrank 8.7 percent in 2015 as global trade slowed. The going could get even tougher in 2017 with record debt falling due.

Why Do Wealthy People Auction Multimillion-Dollar Homes, Rather Than List Them?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hundreds of wealthy homeowners are taking the riskier route by auctioning their home in lieu of listing it. The client base has shifted from people who are selling their third, fourth, or even fifth homes, to older people who are downsizing.

As Flocks Shrink, Congregations Scramble to Adapt

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Those attending church regularly have declined dramatically in recent years, while those who never attend have increased. It would appear that the target of those who attend occasionally may provide an opportunity for survival, but will it look the same?

America Still Makes Things but Sometimes Needs Foreign Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While there have been shifts in manufacturing over the past few decades, there are still opportunities for manufacturing to thrive in developed countries such as the United States. Globalfoundries' facility in New York makes semiconductor wafers and employs 3,000 people with an average salary of $92,000. 9to5 Seating, a Calilfornia-based chair manufacturer, exports quality components from its U.S. factory to China, where assembled chairs are then sold in markets such as Saudi Arabia and China.

Vacancy

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Prison populations are rapidly shrinking, and Corrections Corporation of America’s stock is down. So private prison companies are diversifying into community corrections and rehabilitation, but critics of for-profit prisons remain concerned.

We’re Not Too Old for This

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

At the age of twenty-two, Mark Zuckerberg famously asserted, “Younger people are just smarter.” The demographic profile of employees at Silicon Valley’s technology companies is consistent with this ethos. Job seekers over forty are responding in various ways, including lawsuits, cosmetic surgery, education, and just giving up.

#ExxonKnew Now What?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is oil the new tobacco? Although Exxon’s scientists had evidence connecting burning fossil fuels to climate change, the company may have engaged in a disinformation campaign. Some see parallels between Exxon’s behavior and that of the tobacco industry and hope to hold the company liable for covering up scientific knowledge and misleading the public.

Why Hollywood Makes Digital Magic in the U.K.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some of the world's largest digital effects companies are based in Britain, and the recent drop in the value of the British pound is making these firms even more competitive on a global scale. While skilled talent and competitive prices are important for movie studios that are looking for visual effects expertise, tax breaks or incentives also play a role in attracting portions of the movie business to Britain. Great tax deals in Canada, however, are now causing the British firms to shift some of their work to offices in Vancouver and Montreal.

Putting the Market’s History in the Cloud

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has been trying to create a massive repository that would track stock and options trading from exchanges and broker-dealers on a daily basis. This repository of securities transactions could be world’s largest and help the SEC to look back at unusual market events. Tech firms such as Google parent Alphabet Inc. and Amazon are bidding to help SEC with data storage in clouds.

Hospitals Try Giving Patients a Dose of VR

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hospitals are using virtual reality (VR) to take patients' minds off their pain or relieve their boredom. VR has been shown to swamp the brains sensory capacity, affecting its ability to create as many pain signals. As the cost of hardware and software come down, it is becoming a consideration for longer term treatment.

These Paper Tubes Are Still Made in America

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Family owned and managed for over 100 years, New England Paper Tube was driven into receivership after 3 decades of losses in the face of foreign competition. Under new ownership and lead by the former production manager, the company has returned to profitability by focusing on the products where it has competitive advantage, like mortar shells for fireworks and the military.

Slick as a Whistle Pig

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After a number of failed ventures, Raj Bhakta’s “boutique” rye whiskey endeavor is a hit. But success is leading to conflict, as his partners and investors want to cash out, but he wants to build a family business. Bhakta’s personality and vision may have been key factors in WhistlePig’s success, but also may explain foibles that his partners cite in pending litigation.

Thinking Inside The Box

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ad Magic has become the go-to maker for Kickstarter games. Ad Magic’s revenue has quadrupled since the company was hired to produce the popular Cards Against Humanity.

Asia Is a Growth Market For Military Aircraft

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign sales are becoming increasingly important to U.S.-based defense contractors. Many Asian countries are ramping up their defense spending, while U.S. defense spending on new systems remains relatively flat. As part of a proposal to win sales in India, Lockheed-Martin and Boeing have both indicated that they will manufacture fighter jets in India rather than simply exporting them from the U.S.

India Gets a Deadpool. No, Not That Kind.

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Venture capitalists and/or investors sometimes lose their confidence in their startups and are reluctant to put more money into the venture. This leaves the entity in a spot where they are unable to attain the necessary growth to succeed. Tracxn Technologies, an Indian firm, posts a list of struggling startups that still show potential for investors to try and facilitate a match.

Peak Cheap in China

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After burning billions of investor dollars to attract users and grow market share, mergers and acquisitions among China’s on-demand service providers promise to create dominant players and bring profits. The question is will Chinese users continue to call without the steep discounts.

We’re Paying CEOs All Wrong

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although executive compensation at public companies is increasingly reliant on stock-based compensation and long-term incentives, these approaches may not be optimal. Behavioral economists argue that increased reliance on carefully crafted short-term incentive pay could incentivize executives more cheaply and effectively. Mandated compensation disclosures that increase transparency, however, may actually be impeding change and experimentation that behavioral economists believe could improve the effectiveness of executive compensation.

Scaling Up Is Hard to Do

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Business incubators, accelerators, innovation labs, and a smorgasbord of other entities exist to create or jumpstart entrepreneurial endeavors, but a recent trend of note is to help existing small businesses take their goods and services to the next level.

Snooze

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An Olympics TV ratings slip among viewers age 18-34 is raising questions about NBC’s ability to profit from the games long term. One reason: Sports fans are getting older.

Yasso's Big Fat Frozen Greek Yogurt Success

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An unexpected occurrence offered the founders of Yasso, a five-year-old company with an already established market in the northeastern United States, an opportunity along with a decision to expand. The business now earns $50 million in sales.

Amazon's Shifting Tax Story

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Like many global technology companies, Amazon has actively pursued tax strategies that minimize the taxes it has to pay. In 2005, for example, it shifted certain intellectual property from the United States to a limited liability partnership in Luxembourg, valuing the assets at just over $200 million. Since then, those assets have generated revenue (e.g., licensing fees) of almost $6 billion. Now both the IRS and EU tax authorities are exploring whether Amazon has been underpaying taxes in their jurisdictions.

Walmart’s Crime Problem

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Crimes at Walmart stores keep local police departments busy. Walmart is aware of the problem and has taken steps to address it. Some, however, think the stores are doing too little too slowly, placing profits over people. This is a complex problem involving the intersection of business, government, and society, but other retailers seem to have fewer crimes committed on their premises.

Your Driverless Uber Is Here

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Uber is putting driverless cars in its fleet in downtown Pittsburgh this August and wants to replace its one million drivers as soon as possible. While most companies and analysts are still working on the science, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick says, “We are going commercial.”

A Big Short Against the 2-and-20 Fee

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As big investors take a hard look at fees, hedge fund manager Steve Eisman offers a cheaper way to invest. Facing the likelihood of only modest gains, one easy way for investors to preserve profit is to cut what they pay money managers.

When a Tech Patent is Neither

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A 2014 Supreme Court ruling has slashed business-method filings. It has led courts to toss hundreds of software patents and has halved applications for one type of patent. The number of business-method patent applications has fallen in half since 2014.

Stranded by Saudi Austerity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Low oil prices are leading to a reduction in construction projects in Saudi Arabia. Thus, Saudi construction companies are cutting back on employment, as their cash flow suffers. Caught in the fray are foreign construction workers who aren't getting paid, can't send remittances back to family, and can't get exit visas to leave Saudi Arabia.

A Watchful Lock Aimed at the Masses

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A lock that can be opened using smart device codes that are single use opportunities can lower the risk of general codes for building managers and their tenants. The device also allows for coordination with video devices that can assure security with multiple deliveries or pickups.

Southwest Tries to Squash Its Tech Bugs

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new IT platform will catch the carrier up to its rivals and could boost profits by $500 million. It will be critical for Southwest to strike the right balance between its brand and its finances.

Ed Bastian, CEO Delta Air Lines

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

CEO Ed Bastian attributes Delta’s bankruptcy to “a lot of dumb decisions.” A shift in strategy and better employee relations have helped Delta return to profitability. But industry consolidation and lower oil prices haven’t hurt.

This Kitten Has Claws

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Precision Castparts had strong stock performance under CEO Mark Donegan, until a rough time in the oilfield services business led to a big drop in the company's valuation. Seeing a buying opportunity, Berkshire Hathaway purchased Precision Castparts. The culture at Precision Castparts was one of strong pay-for-performance, but where failing to make the numbers would lead to a verbal thrashing or being fired.

The Internet of Very Expensive Things

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Research, particularly such things as bio-medical research, is extremely expensive and involves many technologies to accomplish an adequate study. One simple facet, such as running out of a supply required to maintain the integrity of the study, can lose valuable time and money for the project. With all of the equipment involved being manufactured by a variety of companies running on proprietary software, it can become quite difficult and time-consuming for the scientist to keep track of the needs. Now they are working on an "App for that!"

Mark Weinberger, CEO EY

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

EY, the accounting and consulting firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, hires around 60,000 people a year. Many of those are young millennials, who have different expectations than previous generations. A key requirement is more flexibility in time, which leads to different ways of organizing the work of individuals and teams.

Amazon Gains on Flipkart in India

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon gains on Flipkart in India. Hobbled by self-inflicted wounds and a price war, the Indian e-commerce company is girding for battle with a deep-pocketed rival.

80,000 Hours of Local News Courtesy of the 2016 Election

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Local TV news viewership is falling, but broadcasters are adding hours anyway to chase campaign ad revenue. Not all campaign consultants are sold on the idea that more local news is better.

Importing the Silicon Valley Lifestyle

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the shadow of an environment that represents repression and stagnation spanning centuries, entrepreneurs in Germany are trying to develop the next Silicon Valley. How is Berlin working to establish a profitable haven for innovators and investors?

Amazon Gains on Flipkart in India

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Flipkart's new CEO, Binny Bansal, is facing a tough challenge from retailer Amazon in the Indian e-commerce market. Bansal's leadership, focusing on reducing costs and improving efficiencies, is what the company needs as it tries to simultaneously cut costs and increase marketshare. While Amazon has been aggressive in signing up third-party retailers to its network, Flipkart has emphasized customer service and building customer loyalty.

Japanese Retailers Move into Vietnam

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Vietnam is attracting a number of foreign retailers as its economy expands, and the middle class develops. About 60 percent of the population is under thirty-five years old, suggesting even stronger future growth. Japanese retailers are staking out major positions in the Vietnamese market, while the domestic Japanese market remains mature.

Becoming a Tax Haven Is Harder Than It Looks

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some in the UK argue for slashing taxes after Brexit, but the move might not be worth the cost to the public purse. If Britain’s cuts are viewed as unfair to other countries, the EU could exact a high price by restricting access to its markets.

Taking Bids on the Hospital of the Future

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Silicon Valley, Kaiser Permanente is testing new hardware and software. Kaiser says its San Leandro test facility is helping it design the hospital systems of the next decade.

Shell Opens Up to Natural Gas

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shell Oil Co. has put its forecasting prowess and money behind the need to reduce carbon emissions and address climate change as it transforms into a natural gas company. Now there's a glut of natural gas.

A Big Settlement That Won’t Fix the Problem

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

$15 billion can fix a lot of problems, but Volkswagen’s settlement with U.S. regulators won’t be the end of the company’s emissions scandal problems. VW will offer to buy back affected vehicles, and vehicles that remain in use will be recalled and repaired. Repaired cars, however, won't fully comply with current emission standards, and this has led to criticism. Some states are separately seeking compensation for public health and environmental damage in suits that cite VW’s culture of arrogance.

This Owl Won't Save America's Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In 2013, Wal-Mart announced a plan to encourage more manufacturing in the United States. Pledging to spend $250 billion over ten years on "Made in America" products, the goal was to entice companies to shift about 250,000 jobs to U.S.-based factories. While the results suggest that products can be efficiently manufactured domestically, with the program leading to an increase in U.S. manufacturing, the number of workers hired has not likely met the projections.

Will Spotify Live Up to Its $8 Billion Valuation?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With technology stocks, IPO valuation is not necessarily related to current or past profitability. This is evident in the estimated IPO value of Spotify, the online music streaming service with 30 million users and $2.2 billion in revenues.

The Woman Giving Verizon a Reboot

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Verizon’s president of product innovation and new businesses, Marni Walden has a high-risk, high-reward position: Walden is charged with leading Verizon’s transformation into a digital information company. Transformational change can be a test of leadership. Verizon’s future may be on the line as Walden auditions for the role of Verizon’s next CEO.

The Battle for Smart Car Data

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Connectivity in your automobile will be convenience, or an intrusive nightmare. Today's sensor-laden cars collect huge amounts of data for which marketers may pay dearly. Automakers want to control such sales.

China's Factory Workers Head Home

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For many years, foreign multinationals have been attracted to China's coastal region, setting up factories to take advantage of low labor costs. Within China, this has led to a migration of young people from rural interior areas to the coastal regions, as they seek income while sending some money home to support their family. This migration has slowed significantly in recent years, as economic development in rural China has created opportunities for some migrants to return home and others to never leave.

Facebook Gave 1.65 Billion Users a Streaming Service Then This Happened

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While live streaming capabilities have attracted even greater use from their core, Facebook is now struggling with what that means for them in terms of infrastructure investment and their responsibility to the public. Also of importance: does it lead to greater profits?

Blackstone Is Turning Tenants Into Owners

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Single-family landlords have been losing renters to homebuying. Blackstone Group LP’s Invitation Homes is selling in Arizona and California. Financial landlords look to profit from renters with dreams to buy.

Courts Deal a Setback to Unions and Obama

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A U.S. district judge’s recently issued injunction highlights challenges in determining the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with mandated disclosures. The injunction blocked implementation of a new Department of Labor regulation that would require companies to disclose payments for more types of anti-unionization consulting services. While unions argued that the regulation would increase transparency and “level the playing field,” the judge decided that the expanded scope of disclosures could adversely affect the availability of legal advice regarding responses to union-organizing campaigns.

Innovation: Ultrasonic X-Rays

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A technology that doesn't use radioactive means to provide superior imaging for dental offices? Sounds like a winner!

Endangered A380 Spotted

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite its glamorous first-class accommodations and superjumbo capacity, the Airbus A380 has been a financial disaster. Little interest from airlines other than Emirates could force Airbus to kill the program.

India Is Cutting Oil Deals Worldwide

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's oil consumption is growing at a 10 percent rate, with gasoline consumption growing even faster. The country, however, imports 75 percent of its oil due to limited domestic supplies. It is working with governments and oil companies in a diverse set of countries, including Iran, Mozambique, Russia, and Afghanistan, to help make sure it has a secure supply of oil to fuel its growing economy.

Down on the Farm, Out at Sea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Worldwide salmon production is down, and prices are up. As salmon farming has become big business, regulations have increased, and obtaining permits has become more difficult. In response, producers are working on new technologies and techniques to lessen the environmental impact of salmon farming and reduce the incidence of natural parasites.

IPNOPE

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While typical exit strategies for tech startups involve large payouts when the company is taken public, investors seem to be intrigued by Kickstarter's payment of a dividend over the spring. They do not seem to be totally against it, but it does seem to be pushing their risk limitations.

Stomping Grounds

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kevin Plank, Under Armour’s founder and CEO, has many ambitions for his company. These include intertwined business and social objectives of becoming world’s biggest sportswear company and revitalizing the city of Baltimore. A passionate and visionary leader, Plank consciously seeks to use the company’s momentum to shape Baltimore’s future.

The Chase Is On To Grab the City's Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With Britain set to leave the European Union, many companies are trying to work through the implications of this for their employees in London. While London is likely to continue to be a major world financial center, some banking jobs may move to other European financial centers. Frankfurt, Dublin, Luxembourg, Amsterdam, and Paris are the leading contenders, and all have distinct advantages and disadvantages.

A Big Fat Tax Is Coming For the Hedge Fund Elite

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Loophole for fund managers slams shut at the end of 2017. Experts searched but "no one has come up with magic bullet." Money managers soon have to recognize a total of at least $100 billion in offshore income. This is good news for charities and tax lawyers.

Swimmin' in Batteries

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By 2018, Tesla will need to double the annual global production of lithium ion batteries. In moves reminiscent of Ford’s River Rouge, Tesla has integrated battery production and is making moves to control supply of the minerals needed.

Designed by Comcast in Philadelphia

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Historically, Comcast has not been one of America’s most loved companies, and it had a reputation for providing clunky cable boxes and poor customer service. But Comcast is changing and wants to be loved. Instead of simply providing cable boxes and access to ever-changing lists of television channels, Comcast wants to make the TV the home’s command center. In doing so, Comcast needs to change its corporate culture to be more like a cool technology company and less like a regulated utility monopoly.

The Hail Mary Pass Of Executive Pay

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The hedge fund, H Partners Management, is introducing an uncommon executive pay practice at Six Flags Entertainment and Tempur Sealy International. Executives receive incentive stock grants with performance thresholds so improbable that the companies deem them worthless at the date of grant. Nevertheless, some of the targets are being met, and executives already have received tens of millions in compensation. This compensation practice raises questions about incentives and potentially inadequate disclosure of compensation, dilution and risk.

Taiwan's PC Makers are Gunning for Gamers

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While PC manufacturers tend to compete in almost a perfect competitive environment, those that focus on giving gamers a small advantage and the ability to adapt are reaping strong profits relative to the enhanced price.

The Great Sea Turtle Migration

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Around a third of foreign students studying in U.S. universities are Chinese, and after graduation many take a job working in the U.S., but after a few years, some return home to help create technologies and companies in China. In Chinese, these professionals are referred to as hai gui, or "sea turtles" that come come home after a long journey.

The Power of the Garage

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Six people that tinker in their garage searching for solutions to technological problems and opportunities.

Monster Beverage's Monster Payout

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A number of companies provide stock, or stock options, to senior managers as a part of their compensation package. Typically at the time of offering the stock is valued at its current price, and it can not be sold for some period of time. A goal is to align managers' incentives with those of shareholders.

A Tractor For Cuba

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Cuba has significant agricultural potential, one of the things holding back agricultural production is a lack of modern farm equipment. Now two U.S. entrepreneurs are hoping to change that by operating the first U.S.-owned manufacturing facility in Cuba. The tractors will be of a simple and adaptable design and targeted for operations on the relatively small farms of Cuba and other developing nations.

Searsly?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sears seemed to falter with the rise of discount retailing. Then Kmart was outdone by Wal-Mart and Target. Merging the two hasn’t improved things. Now Sears wants to sell its top brands. Does that make sense as a turnaround strategy?

Building a Better Mouse Cage

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Using cheap sensors and monitoring devices, coupled with in-depth software, Vium, a company with $30 million in venture capital investment, is hoping to speed up the animal tests sector of the FDA process to provide its users with better inputs into the viability of human testing.

Sixty Million Car Bombs

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Takata’s travails continue as the recalls of its airbags expand. Takata was the only airbag manufacturer to use ammonium nitrate, a chemical with well-known stability issues, as a propellant. Takata’s corporate culture and leadership help explain the decisions that led to the continued production of potentially lethal products and the largest auto recall in history.

An Amazon Wannabe Rises On the Steppes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Yandex can lay claim to running Russia's most successful search engine, as well as Moscow's largest ride-sharing service. In doing so, it has beat out, or at least garnered a strong head start, on Google and Uber. Now it is attempting to do the same with online retailing, offering an Amazon-like marketplace while Amazon has yet to offer its service in Russia.

Disney’s New Cultural Revolution

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Human resource management issues can challenge companies undergoing international expansion; Disney's experiences in China are one example. The company's theme parks depend on character-based entertainment, and in opening its Shanghai resort, talent development has been one of the biggest challenges the Disney has faced. Because there is a limited pool of talent trained in Western performing arts, Disney has needed to be innovative and make substantial investments to recruit and train performers. As competitors plan to open theme parks in China, Disney’s next challenge will be to retain the performers it has trained.

Surf's Up Forever

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kelly Slater Wave Company has figured out how to build the longest, most perfect, surfing wave on the planet. Can he can build a business around it?

Disney's New Cultural Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In preparation for its Shanghai Disneyland theme park, Disney began working with arts institutes in China to build awareness and interest in performing at the park. Part of the challenge was to develop talented performers who could sing in the style of Disney show tunes, such as those in The Lion King. Another part of the challenge was to better understand how Disney productions could be modified to be more interesting to Chinese audiences. In a separate program, Disney launched English language training programs aimed at children two through twelve, with a curriculum that uses Disney characters.

A Spanish Delicacy Grazes in Texas

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Importing pigs that are considered delicacies in Spain but relatively unknown in the United States can be a bit of a risky proposition. Two men in Texas believe that it is worth investing $3 million of their money to build a specialty market for these cured hams.

Making No Cents

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Congress created the U.S. Postal Service in 1970 to run the post office like a business. But it retained a political process for setting prices that has not been responsive to business needs.

Innovation: Delivery Robot

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Starship Technologies has built a robot capable of making deliveries to your house or business. Is this a viable market for robotics?

How Finance Ruined Business

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The book "Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and Fall of American Business" adds up the ill effects of Wall Street’s zero-sum game. It's a timely read for current business students.

At Southwest, a Showdown in Court

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Southwest Airlines and its pilots have been in talks about a new labor contract since 2012. Since then, talks have become increasingly quarrelsome as the airline’s profitability has reached record levels.

The Market Sizes Up

Eric Cardella  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brick-and-mortar clothing retailers have traditionally been reluctant to make plus-size clothing a prominent part of their product offerings. However, over the past several years the demand for plus-size clothing has outpaced smaller-size offerings.

Smartphone Makers Prep for a Rough Spell

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple, along with the smartphone industry, and its suppliers, are facing a maturing market with recent declines sales and stock values. They are trying to diversify through innovation but there doesn’t yet appear to be a next big thing.

Inflatable Space Station

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Space in space is a precious commodity. Bigelow Aerospace has created an expansion kit that compresses down to 127 cubic feet for launch, but is inflatable to almost 5x that size for functional space on the international space station.

Building Assisted Living for the 1 Percent

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Residents' monthly costs at Midtown assisted living building top $20,000. An owner of assisted living facilities is looking to get in on New York's luxury housing boom.

The Ivy League Rejects the UAW

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should graduate students, who are paid to teach classes and assist with research, be classified as employees who can choose to be represented by a union? Part of the answer to this question depends on who controls the executive branch, as policy has changed somewhat between the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations. Another aspect of the answer relates to whether graduate students are doing the work as part of their educational development, or whether they are assigned work and receive pay similar to typical employees.

Why Tesla Scares German Carmakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Purchasers of Tesla's electric vehicles are often looking to spend $40,000 or more on a car. In surveys of Tesla shoppers, the other brands they were most likely considering were BMW, Toyota, Audi, Honda, and Mercedes-Benz. U.S.-based brands such as Cadillac, Chevrolet, Jeep, and Dodge appeared far less often on the shopping lists of Tesla customers.

The Greening of Adidas

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investments in energy efficiency can take years to pay back from cost savings so are often rejected by CFOs. But framing them as a portfolio with returns of over 20 percent convinced Adidas to invest millions per year.

The Greening of Adidas

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An Environmental Defense Fund program recruits and trains MBA students to use traditional financing metrics and techniques to motivate companies to increase fuel efficiency. One of these students was ultimately able to use traditional financial measurements and objects to support capital investment in fuel efficiency projects at Adidas. Applying techniques from finance to sustainability matters can be important in attracting interest in energy efficiency projects.

Rising Profits Don't Lift Workers' Boats

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The potential effects of industry concentration on customers is widely analyzed and a subject of regulatory interest. A recent study explores another potential implication of increasing industry concentration: the effect on labor's share of profits. While there are multiple potential explanations, the study identifies an inverse relation between increasing industry concentration and labor's share of profits. This finding is related to pressing social and political Issues, including livable minimum wages, opportunities for the middle class, and wealth inequality.

German Engineering for Chinese Wannabes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Germany's Borgward auto company was founded in 1924 and at one point was responsible for 60 percent of the country's auto exports. By 1961, however, it had gone out of business. Now the brand is being revived in China, with a Borgward SUV being manufactured by Chinese truck-maker, Beiqi Foton.

A Much Closer Look at Naptime

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Keeping up to date on your kids' day is only an app away now. Apps that digitize updates from preschools and day cares are becoming popular perks for parents.

Lawyers Attack Rivals in TV Spots

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Increased competition leads to more—and nastier—ads. Competition for clients is pushing up lawyer ad spending, which jumped to $823 million in 2015.

Detroit Has Valley Envy

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mobility services, think Uber with self-driving cars, have the potential to disrupt the auto industry model of individual car ownership. So Detroit is seeking alliances with the tech companies and car sharing services behind that threat to strengthen their position.

An East German Challenge to the Swiss

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Last year, watch exports from Germany rose 14 percent, while Swiss watch exports fell 3 percent. Part of the difference in magnitude is driven by the significantly smaller size of the German watchmaking industry, but underlying economics help explain the trends. As the euro has fallen in value relative to the Swiss franc, German watches are relatively more affordable.

A New Dimension for Post-PC Taiwan

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As the technological world shifts to phone and portable methods of operation, the PC market has been dwindling. Mass manufacturers need to use their capacity for new products, and 3D printers seem to provide a new growth oriented market.

At T-Mobile, It's Union vs. Sort-of-Union

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An effort by the Communications Workers of America (CWA) to unionize T-Mobile has so far resulted in two union contracts that cover 30 workers. T-Mobile claims that its internal T-Voice system of engagement with employees helps management understand issues that are important to employees. The CWA, however, contends this is a union-busting tactic that was outlawed in the 1930s.

I Don't Know, I Just Work Here

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For many workers, it is straightforward that they be classified as employees, and for others it is equally clear that they are independent contractors. With the former, all sorts of state and federal regulations then influence pay and benefits, as well as rights to organize and become members of unions. With independent contractors, employers have fewer obligations, and workers have more flexibility. But it is not clear how some workers, such as Uber drivers, should be classified.

A Vegan Cheese Worthy of Chardonnay

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Making a non-dairy cheese has proven to be a difficult task to do well enough to please the discriminating palate. Lyrical Foods and its investors think they may have it and at just the right time.

Keeping It In the Family

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Founding a business and developing its brand is a lifetime task for many entrepreneurs. Letting go and passing it on to family is sometimes a far more difficult task.

What Happened to Those Amber Waves?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Whereas the U.S. used to be the world's largest exporter of wheat, it has lost that position Russia, with Canada poised to push the U.S. to third place. The reasons behind this shift are complex, including improved supply from, and growing conditions in, Russia and Canada. The quality of U.S. wheat still commands a price premium in the market, but the rise in the U.S. dollar makes it less competitive in global markets.

Resuscitating Gap

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gap returns to t-shirts in yet another bid for growth. Can the slumping company Gap figure out what shoppers want to wear?

Reclaiming Instant

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Impossible Project aims to revive the business of making instant film and cameras that once put Polaroid at the top of the tech world. *This article is not available online.

More Women May Sit in the Front of the Plane

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Asia's air travel business is growing rapidly, as an emerging middle class seeks more opportunities to travel. This has been good news for Asia's airlines but is causing a strain on airlines' ability to service the demand. A possible solution is to increase the number of women pilots, who worldwide only comprise 5 percent of commercial pilots. Traditional expectations and work requirements make it hard for many women to rise through the ranks and become commercial pilots.

Innovation Laser-Guided Catheters

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Avinger has created a laser that can guide cardiologists as they navigate the complex system of arteries when operating to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The technology replaces external X-rays, which are more cumbersome and not as clear.

Can Lincoln and Caddy Find Fans in China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China is the world's largest car market, and the luxury segment is growing quickly. While Mercedes, BMW, and Audi have done well in capturing market share, other competitors are trying to pick up a portion of this lucrative market. In January, General Motors opened a Cadillac plant in Shanghai, which will help it avoid import taxes of about 25 percent. Ford is also opening specialized showrooms for its Lincoln brand, offering the same level of customer service as a five-star hotel.

Google's Cloud Chief Aims Higher

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google helped invent the cloud, but it’s still playing catch-up. It is building data centers and recognizing mistakes. Its cloud chief Diane Greene is quadrupling data centers and adding features to better compete with Amazon and Microsoft.

More than 1,000 Women Accuse Johnson & Johnson of Covering Up the Risks of Baby Powder

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The scent of Baby Powder may be more recognizable then that of chocolate, but Johnson & Johnson's iconic century-old product may be associated with more than wholesomeness. Some scientific studies have found an association between Baby Powder use and ovarian cancer. More than 1,000 women and their families are now suing Johnson & Johnson and its supplier of talc, Imerys, claiming the companies failed to warn customers about this risk. Regardless of the conclusiveness of the scientific studies, Johnson & Johnson's violation of customers’ trust puts the entire company’s brand at risk.

Showdown at the Electric Garage

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tesla has busily developed a defensible position in high-end, electric-powered automobiles. With an inelastic demand curve as it relates to oil price fluctuations, their resilience is sound in that sector, but now they have to deal in a sector that is more affected by oil prices. Chevy is also interested in the sector, adding to the complexity in behavioral competitive issues.

Samsung and LG Have A Battery Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Samsung and LG have been successful selling NCM batteries (nickel, cobalt, and manganese) for electric vehicles in China, with much of that success related to generous subsidies the Chinese government has provided to electric buses. A goal in stimulating the use of electric buses is to decrease pollution in China's cities. The government will continue providing subsidies, but only to the less expensive LFP batteries (lithium-iron-phosphate), which are available from a number of Chinese suppliers.

Sowing the Seeds of a Farm Boom in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Africa's population is projected to more than double in the next 35 years, putting a strain on the continent's food supply. Africa already has a problem growing and distributing sufficient food. Years of farming practices that depleted nutrients in the soil has contributed to the problem. To help address the continent's food needs, major agricultural companies and NGOs are working on a variety of solutions.

Companies Pitch In On Student Debt

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the average amount of student loan debt growing, some employers are seeing a silver lining of opportunity in what is often characterized as a social problem. By offering to match employee student loan payments, employers can provide an attractive benefit that helps recruit young highly educated workers. These benefits may help alleviate the burden of student debt help address a potential crisis regarding retirement savings.

At Work and Out of the Closet in the Heartland

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite inconsistent state laws regarding employment discrimination based on sexual orientation, a record number of companies has earned a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Corporate Equality Index. Economic incentives may be motivating companies like Hormel to outpace anti-discrimination laws with diversity and inclusiveness initiatives. By working to support a diverse workforce, these companies are creating value by creating workspaces that are attractive to younger workers.

The Journey of Jack Dorsey

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Twitter is one of the most recognized brands in the social media market even though it is yet to turn a profit. Co-founder and past (and again) CEO Jack Dorsey is not necessarily reflecting on the past of Twitter except to the extent it can guide the future into profitable domains to leverage the brand.

Google Kicks Its Car Fight Upstairs

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While some states are eager to put Google’s autonomous cars on their roads, others, like California, are proposing stiffer regulations. Google is lobbying Congress for uniform national rules it hopes will be more favorable.

From Shared Values to Shared Quarters

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Scandinavian-style co-housing is gaining traction among boomers. The U.S. is home to more than 150 co-housing communities, with 14 more planned exclusively for seniors.

A Would-Be Wi-Fi Paradise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sri Lanka is working with Google to provide Wi-Fi service country-wide. As part of the system, Google is launching Wi-Fi equipment that is attached to balloons that can provide service to remote locations. Providing Wi-Fi will help more residents get online, but the next challenge is providing sufficient capacity of high-speed internet connections to and from the island nation.

Help Workers, Risk Losing Money for Cops

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Arizona cities that raise wages or mandate sick pay would lose state funding under legislation being considered by state lawmakers.

Move Fast and Break Things

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A decade after taking over General Electric, Jeff Immelt’s long bet on the Internet of Really Big Things seems to be paying off. But competitive challenges still exist.

Honda CEO Pledges Quality over Quantity

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Honda’s new CEO, Takahiro Hachigo, is working to eliminate quality control problems and rebuild the company’s reputation. He's already reshuffled Honda’s executive ranks and plans to raise domestic output by 30 percent, to 950,000 vehicles, by 2020.

Move Fast and Break Things

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Under previous CEO Jack Welch, General Electric was highly successful as a diversified conglomerate. Jeff Immelt, who took over in 2001, has shifted the company's focus from financial services and home appliances to industrial products and associated software. He also has implemented cultural changes.

Instacart, Brought to You by Red Bull

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Customers hate delivery fees, so Instacart went to retail partners to help. The grocery delivery startup says ads from General Mills, PepsiCo, and other consumer companies account for 15 percent of revenue.

Europe Bets on Robots to Help Care for Seniors

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Robots may be able to help the elderly, and Europe is testing the idea. By one estimate, 32,500 robots designed to help care for the elderly and disabled will be sold from 2015 through 2018.

A Zara of Modesty Rises in Turkey

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Appealing to the tastes of conservative Muslim women in Turkey and around the Middle East is giving fast fashion retailer LC Waikiki an edge over global competitors like Zara and H&M.

Venture Investors Are Taking a Pause

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite the signs of economic recovery (or at least stabilization), the money market for startups has actually tightened over the past several years. This tightening has been both in terms of number of deals and the amounts of funding.

Where Retirement Isn't Job One

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

At a Brooks Brothers sewing factory in Long Island, New York, more than half the employees are over fifty-five years old, and the average tenure is thirty years. These older, highly skilled workers have the ability to make ties by hand or perform custom tailoring that can quickly supply stores in New York City. In order to help retain these older workers, Brooks Brothers has established a set of human resource management policies that appeal to veteran employees.

A Zara of Modesty Rises in Turkey

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Kucuk brothers have helped turn a French fashion retailer into a multinational company focused on conservative fashions for observant Muslims. Their chain, LC Waikiki, now has over 600 locations, with about a third outside Turkey. LC Waikiki tries to have a great range of stylish apparel for "covered women."

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Retailers are beginning to use facial recognition software to collect data and engage with customers. While customers could benefit from personalized shopping experiences, using this technology involves customer surveillance and raises privacy concerns. The use of facial recognition technology in retail settings also has human resource, legal, and ethical implications.

This Guy Made Trump Possible

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Seeking to assist his clients in rapid response communication media strategies, antiwar activist and former Lycos programmer Jim Gilliam has developed programs for Republican and some Democratic prospects to assist them in effectively delivering their messages via social media.

Overwhelmed by Chinese Investment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese companies have recently been on a buying spree. In January and February of 2016, Chinese companies announced over $77 billion in investments, mergers, or acquisitions of foreign companies. All deals involving potential risks to U.S. national security, however, can fall under review of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S., or CFIUS. CFIUS has blocked some potential deals, and just a decision to review some deals has caused potential foreign investors to back off. Many deals are approved after review, although CFIUS has blocked other deals that it felt could threaten U.S. security interests.

Sprint's Plan to Mortgage Its Airwaves

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sprint is facing $34 billion in debt. They plan to borrow from a subsidiary that they will create.

Intel and Samsung Are On a Collision Course

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For decades, Intel has had a dominant position in microprocessors while Samsung has had a strong position in memory chips. Now the two firms are positioning themselves to take bites out of each other’s primary chip markets.

Bond Trader's Dilemma

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Deepening concern over the global economy has made sub-zero interest rates the norm in most European Union countries as well as Japan. The willingness of debt investors to effectively pay governments to borrow reflects increasing skepticism of central bank policies and concern that those policies may ultimately do more harm than good to the global economy.

Citigroup Faces Fraud Suit Claiming $1.1 Billion in Losses

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When Oceanografia went under, investors blamed Citigroup for keeping it afloat with cash advances. Now the investors are suing Citigroup, maintaining that it colluded in the fraud that surfaced at Oceanografia.

Intel and Samsung Are On a Collision Course

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Intel and Samsung, the world’s No. 1 and No. 2 chipmaker, respectively, have successfully dominated different segments of the market for years. Competitive forces are now causing them to increasingly go head-to-head for the same customers.

Someone Didn’t Get the Memo

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple is poised to fight a federal court order requiring the company to create software allowing federal instigators to bypass standard iPhone security features to access data on a cell phone that was owned by one of the San Bernadino shooters. Complying with the order would required Apple to compromise longstanding corporate priorities and would be at odds with the company’s ethos.

Startups Pitch VCs From Freezing Water

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There is nothing like the threat of hypothermia to get an entrepreneur to cut to the chase when pitching their product or service. Using frigid water as a timer, a European elevator-pitch competition offers an $11,000 reward to the winner.

Someone Didn't Get the Memo

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple is resisting a court order to help the U.S. government gain access to the iPhone that belonged to the shooter in the San Bernardino attack. The government claims that it is asking for a one-time request for one device.

Apple's Other Johny

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple is well known for its differentiation on design and software. Less well known is that Apple spends billions to design its own chips for the iPhone and iPad.

If You Are Anti Are you Anti?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Until January 2014, Walmart rejected applications for spousal health benefits from employees who were legally married to same-sex spouses. By arguing that denying coverage to her same-sex spouse is a form of sex discrimination, an employee’s suit to recover costs incurred after Walmart denied her application for spousal health benefits has the potential to expand the scope of sex discrimination.

The $400,000 Man

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has developed a crash test dummy that measures 7 times as many variables as the current standard. Not only that, there is an implication that it can also provide more accurate measurements as well. They sent out for bids to produce this test dummy, and the winner was Humanetics Innovative Solutions. The contract could be quite lucrative, at $400,000 per unit.

Google Isn't Paying The 'Google Tax'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A number of multinational corporations have come under scrutiny in Europe and the US over tax strategies that minimize taxes paid. While there are a variety of mechanisms for tax avoidance, the basic idea involves shifting costs to locations with high corporate tax rates, and revenue to locations with low corporate tax rates. While the European Union and national governments are changing laws to make tax avoidance harder, firms such as Google are still able to shift profits to countries with the lowest tax rates.

Amazon's Plan to Take On UPS and Alibaba

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon says it is building global delivery capabilities to supplement existing carriers during peak times, but internal documents suggest it is quietly building a major competitor in the global shipping and delivery business.

Putting the App In Appalachia

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When some industry lifecycles begin to accelerate toward decline, the pace of change has altered the macroeconomic environment. As sectors such as energy production move into more volatile cycles, workers are displaced, but some of them are capable of making a profitable transition.

The Loonie Is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The National Hockey League (NHL) keeps its books in U.S. dollars, with all revenues expenses earned in other currencies converted to U.S. dollars (not unlike many U.S.-based multinational firms). The recent fall in the Canadian dollar, however, means that the league will be reporting lower overall revenue when the Canadian funds are converted to U.S. dollars. With about a third of the NHL's revenues coming from Canada, an 18% drop in the exchange rate means that revenues would fall around 6%. All player salaries, however, are negotiated in U.S. dollars.

The Loonie is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Approximately one third of National Hockey League (NHL) revenue is generated in Canada. Since the league’s compensation arrangement is based on revenue sharing and salaries measured and paid in U.S. dollars, the weak Canadian dollar is affecting team owners and players. The revenue sharing arrangement, a variation on profit-sharing, means that players and owners share in the currency risk.

They're Hiring In Eastern Europe

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the integration of Eastern European countries into the European Union, large disparities in wages across the EU became evident. As a result, many Western manufacturing firms started shifting labor intensive manufacturing jobs to Eastern regions. Meanwhile, many Eastern workers started looking westward for higher wages. The result of those two trends has now led to low unemployment in Eastern Europe, and companies are struggling to find enough workers for factory jobs.

You Won't Find GrubHub Here

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sometimes all the infrastructural elements are in place for leading industry transformation, allowing entrepreneurs to enter a market. It's also possible that some sociocultural (as well as economic) structural impediments keep the obvious from taking place, at least in the short run.

The Real Life Storage Wars

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Entrepreneurs and venture capital see an opportunity in storage. The $33 billion industry is still growing, and new on-demand business models look promising.

The Female Solidarity, Have-It-All, Feel-Good Machine

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Women's empowerment conferences are booming. While this trend may reflect a growing interest in the empowerment of women, it remains uncertain if the conferences are helping women advance their careers or if the demand may actually reflect the need for more change.

Stealing White

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Walter Liew spent decades collecting information about DuPont's proprietary process for producing titanium oxide, a compound used to make things white. Much of the information that he obtained came from disgruntled former DuPont employees. While DuPont has elaborate security processes designed to protect its titanium oxide process, Liew's success shows that former employees are a potential point of vulnerability for trade secrets. Corporations may find it valuable to maintain the loyalty of former employees, especially those with sensitive knowledge.

The Real Life Storage Wars

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The storage businesses will generate $33 billion in 2016, estimates research firm IBISWorld, up from $24 billion in 2010. More than 50,000 self-storage facilities are in the United States. Startups are trying to carve out a slice of the expanding storage industry by offering on-demand pickup and delivery.

Samsung’s Emerging Market Is . . . Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Samsung holds around 20 percent worldwide market share in smartphones, it has just 6 percent of the smartphone market in Japan. As it expanded worldwide, Samsung chose to focus on other emerging markets and largely left the Japanese market to local competitors. In fact, other than Apple, foreign phone makers have had difficulty entering the Japanese market.

Can Bombardier Fly With the Big Boys?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bombardier's goal of competing with Boeing and Airbus in the market for 100-plus seat aircraft has fallen short of expectations. While Bombardier has received orders and is getting ready to deliver its first aircraft, its order book is much weaker than it anticipated. With its stock trading below a dollar and the company operating at a loss, the Quebec and Canadian governments may need to step in to provide financial backing (and save jobs).

Who Owns the Sun?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Warren Buffett’s utility NV Energy is winning the battle with Elon Musk’s SolarCity by getting the Nevada Public Utilities Commission to adopt rules making rooftop solar panels unattractive. NV Energy prefers deals with concentrated solar farms to meet renewable energy targets.

No Cheers When Wal-Mart Packs Up

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Wal-Mart has long been criticized for driving mom-and-pop stores out of business in small towns and rural communities. Still, Wal-Mart stores served consumers and provided employment. As the company begins closing hundreds of stores, including all of its small Wal-Mart Express stores, small towns and rural areas are experiencing a whipsaw effect: When Wal-Mart stores close, communities are left without grocery stores or pharmacies. The company's decision to shutter stores and increase efficiency is partially explained by recent increases in wages. These wage increases may be seen as socially responsible, but the store closings in small towns and rural communities has an adverse effect.

E-Mail Spam Goes Artisanal

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Scammers are turning to small batch attacks to beat today’s more sophisticated e-mail filters. As artisanal spam becomes a bigger problem, the cybersecurity industry is pushing for adoption of new protections that could save our in-boxes.

Swiss Watches Take a Licking

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Swiss watch industry is lowering prices and looking to new markets. High-end Swiss luxury watches saw sales drop 3.3 percent in 2015, the first annual decline since 2009.

Gaming's Growing Pains

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As gaming leagues show rapid growth and indications that they're growing profits too, the competitive arena for leagues and teams has ramped up. As profits become more certain, interest from major investors seeking to leverage their economies of scope and scale are beginning to enter the fray. In question are the distribution of overall industry profits (appropriation) throughout the key stakeholder groups involved and how the cooperation can create even more value.

The Iran Invasion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The multinational agreement regarding Iran's nuclear program has opened the door for many foreign firms to pursue business deals in Iran. Not only are many foreign business leaders visiting Iran, but on a recent trip to Europe, the country's president, Hassan Rouhani, closed deals with several European firms. Most American firms, however, still have significant restrictions on what they can do in Iran.

Haier Has Higher Ambitions

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese appliance-maker Haier has become a major global competitor but, after fifteen years of trying, has yet to establish a strong position in the United States. Now it has acquired one by agreeing to pay $5.6 billion for GE’s appliance unit.

Why Doesn't Silicon Valley Hire Black Coders?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although African Americans comprise about 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for only about 1 percent of the technical employees at most Silicon Valley companies. There are multiple explanations behind this statistic, with many companies taking steps to try and boost employment of African Americans.

Chowing Down on Boomers' Brains

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As more baby boomers inch towards retirement, companies are taking steps to facilitate knowledge transfer to the millennial generation. While millennials may have analytical skills and knowledge of data, boomers have expertise that can help fill the gaps. Programs that pair younger workers with more senior coaches and mentors are one way companies are trying to capture more knowledge from boomers before they retire.

AmEx Struggles to Reach Beyond the Rich

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

AmEx is dismantling its enterprise growth division, initially created to develop additional sources of revenue, lure new customers, and help fend off Silicon Valley startups. AmEx’s CEO and chair, Ken Chenault, is also creating a new consumer-lending business.

A Pressing Matter: The Olive Oil Trade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The olive oil industry is based around the Mediterranean Sea. Tunisia, Spain, and Italy are the world's largest producers. While the United States is far behind in terms of production volume, California producers are taking a much more scientific approach to growing, harvesting, and processing olives.

Better Coffee Through Bacterial Chemistry

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rarely do you think of going to pick up coffee with pricey brews made from the digestive results of a cat-like animal, but that's what Afineur is hoping people will do.

Haier Has Higher Ambitions

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Haier, a China-based manufacturing firm, is buying General Electric's appliance business for $5.4 billion. While General Electric appliances are well known in United States, the company has done little to expand its appliance business internationally. Haier has made some inroads in the U.S. market and expanded in other markets both through growth and acquisitions. This acquisition will help Haier move from a small to significant player in the U.S. appliance market.

The Challenges for Smart-Gun Makers

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The second amendment to the constitution and protection of the public interest square off. Creating safety devices to limit misuse of constitutional rights seems like it might be a profitable realm of technology development, but beware of consumer demands.

Facebook's Fight to Be Free

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Facebook sees India as a market with great potential, but many potential customers have limited internet access. In India, Facebook has teamed up with mobile service provider Reliance to offer free access to a focused and simple version of Internet access at reduced download speeds. The goal is to get new consumers interested in Internet access, and then be able to sell them full service options (around 40% upgrade within 1 month). The service has critics, however, who don't like how this contradicts net neutrality.

The Fed is on Bubble Watch

Derek Abrams  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Since the subprime crisis, the Fed has taken a preemptive approach to prevent any potential economic problems. By using a variety of regulatory moves, Fed officials are hoping that this aggressive approach to monetary management will deflate any asset bubbles before they burst.

This is Going on Your Record

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Banks and regulators are discussing options for creating a registry that hiring managers could access to identify individuals who have previously violated bank rules or codes of conduct. Such a registry might create a disincentive for questionable conduct and reduce the ability of offenders to move easily between banks.

Meal Plan

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After experimenting with a variety of business models for its meal delivery business, Munchery has settled on one that gives it greater control of operations and customer experience, but with high fixed costs. This could give it a more sustainable competitive advantage.

Spotify Isn’t Laughing Off This Lawsuit

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A lawsuit could result in Spotify having big liabilities from unpaid royalties. How much are these potential liabilities? And how is Spotify dealing with them?

Less For Le$$

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As prices and mortgage rates rise, builders are trimming home sizes and cutting prices -- including offering homes starting in the $200,000 range -- to lure young buyers.

An Unhappy New Year For Asia's Shipyards

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Asian shipbuilders have experienced canceled orders and a significant slowdown in new orders due to falling oil prices and slower growth in commodity demand from China.

Peanut Patch: Allergy Fighter

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A tiny patch designed by Pierre-Henri Benhamou of DBV Technologies, a French firm, has shown promise in helping its users overcome one of the most widespread and dangerous food allergies: peanuts.

That Drug Coupon Isn't Really Clipping Costs

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

High copays, copay coupons, and anti-coupons, it’s a battle between pharmaceutical companies and health insurers to influence consumer choice about purchasing high-priced drugs.

Innovation Dojo

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apps have made it relatively common to have remotely controlled systems in the home. Unfortunately, these systems can be hacked, creating massive losses both financially and even physically. Dojo, a cybersecurity system domiciled in Israel and designed to pick up on hacking attempts on home systems, has garnered over $1 million in seed money for their solution to this problem.

The Sustainable Locally Sourced Free-Range Humanely Raised Made-to-Order Toxic Burrito

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

At what price has Chipotle focused on providing “food with integrity?” After three different pathogens have caused five outbreaks and sickened hundreds of Chipotle customers across the United States, Chipotle is shifting its focus to food safety. This shift, however, means a departure from many established organizational routines and practices.

Canada's AI Experts Head South

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Canada's investment in neural network technology has helped its universities develop significant expertise in artificial intelligence. Technology firms such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter have hired Canadian artificial intelligence experts, and/or purchased companies and the technology they helped develop. While there is some concern regarding a brain drain with these high skilled employees moving to the U.S., it is helping the government and universities realize that they need to do more to help retain and attract this human capital in Canada.

Nice Work if You Can Give It to Yourself

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A company's board of directors are responsible for determining the pay of senior executives and providing oversight for major financial decisions. But, interestingly enough, they are also responsible for setting their own pay, which varies widely across companies. While Berkshire Hathaway's outside directors received average compensation of under $4,000 last year, those at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals received on average just under $1.9 million.

Nice Work If You Can Give It to Yourself

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

High CEO pay at public companies has received a great deal of attention and much criticism. Meanwhile, high compensation of board members who set CEO pay, as well as their own, has gone under the radar.

Innovation Universal Virus Test

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A comprehensive virus test that can eliminate the need for iterative process of elimination tests can save time and money, both of which are critical in health care. This experimental test, developed by a professor at Columbia, could bring this to fruition in the near future.

Small Suppliers Big Problems

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chipotle prides itself on serving fresh, healthy fast food, using local vegetable suppliers wherever possible and meat from animals raised without added hormones and antibiotics. These goals for freshness and healthy ingredients complicate supply chain management, however, and have led to shortages of certain ingredients. More troubling is the recent rash of food-borne illnesses that have been traced to Chipotle restaurants across the country.

Vial Accusations

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes has diligently cultivated the medical diagnostic company over the past 12 years and is just now hitting the mainstream of her target market. However, both she and the company face stiff challenges.

A Merger That Activist Investors Can Love

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By merging then breaking up into three companies, Dow and DuPont can achieve focus and scale at the same time. That should finally make their activist investors happy.

Yuletemps

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon’s boom year means a swell in temporary workers, which cuts into profit -- though not as much as putting them on staff would. The weekly price of Amazon’s holiday help is $70.4 millon.

A Big Bike Maker Steers Uptown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Taiwanese bike maker Giant Manufacturing's U.S. sales grew 13.8 percent in the first half of 2015, as it pushed higher-end products. The firm is looking to aggressively expand its market presence in the U.S.

Stop, or We'll Tell Your Parents

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.K.'s National Crime Agency is trying to scare young hackers straight with door-knocks and ad campaigns. The police now visit the parents of the teens before a crime is committed.

Jeff Bezos Just Ignited a New Space Race

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Both Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are building companies in the business of launching people and goods into space. Will they compete head to head or carve out separate niches in space travel?

Cognizant: From Outsourcing to Consulting

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

IT services company Cognizant is trying to take on IBM. Cognizant’s profit is up an estimated 20 percent this year as the outsourcer shifts more resources to consulting services.

Another Way For States to Get Federal Help

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kansas and other states are taking advantage of a funding mechanism that allows for an increase in state health provider taxes and state Medicaid spending, all essentially paid for by the federal government.

Watch Out, JPMorgan! This Guy Wants to Kill Banks

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Banking and lending seem to be divided across several dimensions of strategic groupings. Social Finance (SoFi) has managed to take specific needs of millennials, such as targeting student loans for those exiting college, and turn them into an open door to offer additional services typically provided by large banks.

Making Ethical Chic

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Everlane’s approach to business has been characterized as more "missionary" than "mercenary." The online retailer sells fashionable shoes, clothing, and accessories, but also discloses details about the factory where each item is made and the costs of production.

Profiting From Poor Africans

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

M-Kopa, a Kenyan company in the solar power business, plans to be a $1 billion firm by selling solar panels to rural residents -- and providing them with credit. M-Kopa's typical customer lives on less than $2 per day, but is willing to purchase a $200 power system in order to save money on kerosene and electricity.

That Feeling When You Win a Supreme Court Case and Get Nothing

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Plaintiffs in ideologically driven cases before the Supreme Court often have little at stake personally in the outcome. In one current case, Abigail Fisher, a recent college graduate, is challenging the University of Texas over its admissions process even though she's no longer in school and is seeking only $100.

Pfizer's $160 Billion Change of Address

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pfizer will make its $160 billion deal with Allergan look like the much smaller Allergan has acquired Pfizer. This will allow the merged company to claim its tax location in Dublin and cut its taxes in half. The Pfizer CEO and the U.S. president disagree on whether this is responsible corporate behavior.

Surveillance in Aisle 4

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Walmart has a long and consistent history of opposing unionization of its workforce. The company carefully monitors activities of workers that may be trying to convince coworkers to join a union and provides extensive training to help managers understand legal limitations regarding federal employment regulations. In the past several years there have been a number of protests and partial strikes on Black Friday at some Walmart stores, but the company has used public relations and labor relations teams to effectively minimize disruptions.

A Tiny Speed Bump for Streaming’s Advance

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

British singer Adele and Sony Music Entertainment are betting fans will show up at record stores and on iTunes to buy a copy rather than stream it on Apple Music and Spotify. The initial sales data suggests they are right. There are questions if this phenomenon will slow the growth of streaming services.

SoftBank's $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Masayoshi Son, Chief Executive Officer of SoftBank, hired Nikesh Arora from Google to help the company invest $3 billion per year in promising startups with high end potential. Unlike most pools like this, they are not using a shotgun approach with the money, rather they are going to focus huge amounts of cash on around 10 startups. This Bloomberg Businessweek article gives personal insight into Arora and his frame of mind as well as his philosophies on risk.

Pfizer's $160 Billion Change of Address

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To understand the logic behind the merger of Allergan and Pfizer, the relative corporate tax rates of the U.S. and Ireland make it simple--35 percent and 12.5 percent, respectively. As a U.S.-based company, Pfizer's worldwide profits were taxed at 35 percent. In what is referred to as a tax inversion, Ireland-based Allergan technically purchased the much bigger Pfizer.

Why Takata's Recall Is Stalled

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nineteen million Takata air bags have been recalled, and despite the seriousness of the safety issue, it may take four years to replace them all. The problem may be compounded by both additional recalls and the financial challenges facing Takata as carmakers stop ordering the company's air bags. While Takata and car manufacturers face challenges related to this recall, car owners are the real losers of this protracted process.

What Goes Up—But Doesn’t Come Down

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Small numbers of manufacturers now control the market for many common hospital drugs. Limited production and shortages have resulted in sustained price increases of 100 percent and more.

New York Gambles on A Daily Fantasy Ban

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The attorney general of the State of New York is threatening the fantasy football industry. The top three competitors are responding very differently, but the primary concern is that other states will follow suit and substantially change the laws that govern fantasy football.

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new trade agreement between Australia and China has paved the way for additional trade. One development is the shipping of live cattle from Australia to China, where the cows are then slaughtered. Specialized containers have been developed to facilitate the shipping of cattle on Boeing 747 aircraft, which allows shipping to cities far from China's coast.

Hey Mom, Set Another Place at Dinner for Fido

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The pet foodie movement is surging. Premium pet food now accounts for more than half of the $23.7 billion market, and new entrants with innovative products are taking a big chunk.

Carnival Rocks the Boat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Carnival’s CEO, Arnold Donald, has replaced seven of the company’s nine cruise line heads, and given them a charge to think outside the box to reach new customers. Donald believes that a diverse group of people working together can outperform a more homogenous group 90 percent of the time. His new cruise line heads reflect this philosophy. In an industry that is male-dominated and white, four of Donald’s new cruise line heads are women, one is black, one is gay, and some have no experience in the industry.

Faux-Rock Stars

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Entrepreneurial businesses are sometimes like trying to climb a rock wall, but in this case the business IS creating and manufacturing the rock walls.

Hey Mom, Set Another Place at Dinner for Fido

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The “eat-like-your-owner” strategy appears to be paying off for entrepreneurial high-end pet food manufacturers. Sales of premium dog food have surged 45 percent to $10.5 billion in the U.S. since 2009 and now account for more than half of the market. But is this a sustainable marketing strategy?

Faux-Rock Stars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Indoor rock climbing gyms are being opened worldwide, and the world's largest builder (Walltopia) comes from an unlikely location - Bulgaria. Two and a half hours outside Sofia, in the small town of Letnitsa, is a factory that has supplied walls to gyms in more than 50 countries. Through a combination of cheap labor, innovative designs, and willingness to develop custom walls for clients, Walltopia has gained a loyal worldwide customer base for their climbing walls.

The Teacher Who Could Gut Unions

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the current U.S. Supreme Court case of Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (CTA), the plaintiff is challenging a prior Court ruling allowing public-sector unions to charge fees to nonmembers. About half of union labor is with public-sector employees.

Slapping a 'Natural' Label on Everything

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brands are using a variety of labels to appeal to customers’ interests in wholesome foods. By labeling food products as "natural" or "authentic," companies may be responding to customer demands, but it is unclear what these claims mean. Loose regulations allow companies to label many food products in ways that are potentially misleading.

The Netflix Effect is Spreading

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Original content has become a key success factor for video streaming services that want to compete with Netflix and Amazon. The revenue generated by subscription and rental fees is fueling higher-quality productions than the ad model.

A Wal-Mart Heir is $27 Billion Poorer Than Everyone Thought

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By giving much of his estate away before death, John Walton avoided billions in estate taxes and left more for his heirs to inherit. How did he manage to do it?

Slapping a ‘Natural’ Label On Everything

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As companies reformulate products and label them to evoke a sense of natural authenticity, terms such as “local,” “humanely raised,” and “authentic” are largely left to the interpretation of food marketers. The conclusion is that consumers are left to figure it out for themselves. But do we know what we are eating?

Renewables Will Have to Stand on Their Own

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Renewable energy innovators throughout Europe and the U.S. used to be able to count on significant public investments from their governments. But now the U.S. is following some European countries by cutting back on tax credits for wind and solar.

China's Slowdown Won't Deter Apple

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China has been Apple's manufacturing base and sales growth engine for the past several years. Although growth in Chinese sales of all smartphones is slowing, Apple has seen its third-quarter sales double from 2014 to 2015. While such a high growth rate may not be sustainable, Apple will continue to view the Chinese market as an increasingly important source of revenue.

Your Health Plan Will Now Self-Destruct

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ten nonprofit co-ops created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have failed recently in part due to a lack of Congressional funding. The co-ops were created to promote competition in state health insurance marketplaces.

Hang $99.99

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Wavestorm of Taiwan has become the surfboard industry leader by selling soft surfboards for $99.99 exclusively through Costco. Some say WaveStorm is killing the industry with low margins. Others hope it will expand the market and lead to eventual growth in sales of higher-end boards.

Hang $99.99

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A Taiwanese manufacturer and a Canadian toy executive joined forces to make a low-price surfboard that’s a best-seller in the U.S.

Apple’s Deep Learning Curve

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the world of artificial intelligence innovation, does secrecy hurt? Many talented researchers in this field are turned off by the limitations that Apple places on participation in AI-related professional and academic conferences.

Apple’s Deep Learning Curve

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple is ramping up its artificial intelligence efforts, but the company’s reticence to publish its research is limiting its effectiveness and applicant pool.

Make it Rain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Weather Modification Inc., a North Dakota-based company, has built a global business in cloud seeding. While its pilots and planes fly all over the world doing cloud seeding, it also offers consulting services to help governments and local contractors develop their own ability to stimulate precipitation.

Beefed Up

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

According to drug manufacturer Elanco, the world’s growing demand for meat, milk, and eggs is a more urgent priority than American consumers’ desire for food that is organic, antibiotic free, or pasture-raised. Elanco's answer is the use of antibiotics and growth hormones to increase food production. But is it safe?

Glencore Restructures, Zambia Suffers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Glencore, a global mining company based in Switzerland, recently announced it will lay off more than 4,000 workers at mines in Zambia. During the shutdown, the company will spend money on improving the mining operations to try and cut operating costs. But for most workers, as well as the communities that supply goods and services to the mine workers, what had been a bright spot in a bleak economy will be dimmed.

Big Electric Shocks Big Oil

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

California has decided to support electric vehicles in a big way. Soon petroleum companies will be in direct competition with California’s big electric utilities with their thousands of new charging stations.

Bonnie's Army: Can Halo 5 Save the Xbox?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Microsoft tries to salvage respect in an environment that doesn't tremble at the company's name and might. While unarguably a key player in the gaming industry, it has most certainly not taken the dominant position in the game console market that it has in the computer software realm. Microsoft is banking on its new Halo release to at least maintain its stake and maybe further it in the near future.

Fraudvergnügen

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Volkswagen’s “clean diesel” technology turns out not to be so clean after all. Some Volkswagen cars only met emission standards because the company used software to fool emissions tests by turning on special emission controls only during testing conditions. While it remains unknown who at Volkswagen was responsible, hubris may be one of the explanations for why Volkswagen cheated, and it may also explain why the company so readily admitted to the fraud.

Fraudvergnügen

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Legislation in the United States has encouraged automakers to explore new technologies to reduce vehicle emissions and increase fuel economy. While some automakers have turned to hybrid and electric vehicles, Volkswagen chose to invest in what it termed clean diesel technology. In many ways, this was simply building on Volkswagon's strengths and investments in diesel engines, but when the technology couldn't quite get the company to the point it desired, a few lines of code were used to trick the emissions tests.

Why Roku Isn't Going After Gamers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple, Amazon, and Google all think there is an opportunity to stream games over their new streaming devices. Roku is listening to game makers and gamers who disagree.

A Wage Hike for Workers, A Win for Fiat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fiat Chrysler’s tentative agreement with the UAW will increase its employee wages across the board. Nevertheless, by avoiding a cap on the number of newly hired workers that it can employ, Fiat Chrysler will continue to enjoy a labor cost advantage over the other Big Three automakers. Unionized workforces make automakers’ compensation and other human resource management issues subject to labor union negotiations. Thus, the ability to successfully negotiate labor agreements with an eye toward developing strategic advantages is an important dimension of human resource management for Fiat Chrysler and other automakers.

In Brazil, Getting It There is No Fun at All

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Keeping production cost low is important for any firm, but inbound and outbound logistics within the linked value chain have powerful impacts as well. Infrastructural components can create advantages and disadvantages in the global market.

Stanford Sex Romp!

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Stanford's Graduate School of Business (GSB) is among the world’s top business programs, yet it is currently grappling with a scandal that includes both human resource management and organizational behavior issues.

Smartphone Margins

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple claims 90 percent of the smartphone industry’s profits. Although other firms offer very competitive phones, so far they seem to be eroding one another's positions -- not Apple's.

Retirement Savings Tips From TIAA-CREF’s Roger Ferguson

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Financial literacy for all generations is important. The CEO of TIAA-CREF says that even if Americans increase their savings, when they stop working they'll still need a guaranteed income, like traditional pensions used to provide.

Cloud Computing Finally Gets Some Startups

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cloud services, an industry developed by IT giants for IT giants, is finally seeing a few startups enter its realm. The startups have managed to underbid the giants in certain markets by keeping expenses relatively low.

One Company Tries Life Without (Much) E-Mail

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Atos, a global IT-services firm, is trying to sell companies on its e-mail-minimizing social network -- which it says is a major timesaver.

Metal Meltdown

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Strong demand from China drove high prices and robust investment in commodity materials for over a decade. Now China’s slowing economy has the increased supply meeting lower demand, and many industries are awash in materials.

Buying a Diploma Is Easy If You Can Pay Up

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In some countries, economic development is negatively impacted by a corrupt educational system that does not allow the brightest poor students to reach their potential. Instead, wealthier students (or their parents) pay to get into prestigious schools, receive inflated test scores, and/or receive bogus degrees. As a result of this corruption, deserving students are denied educations, and some who receive degrees may not have skills that are consistent with their educational credentials. Multinational corporations must adapt hiring and training practices in these environments and thus bear some of the costs of educational corruption. The costs borne by society and individuals, however, may be much more substantial.

Long Live the King

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Burger King is relying more heavily on data to make sure its marketing is cost-effective as it reaches customers through digital and social media. Franchisees say the resulting buzz has translated into higher restaurant sales, and the company is doing it for about one fourth of what McDonald’s spends on advertising.

Early Promise for a New Paralysis Treatment

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new spinal insert can enhance the outcomes of spinal damage victims.

Buying a Diploma Is Easy If You Can Pay Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In some countries, the education system has been undermined by corruption. Wealthy families can bribe teachers and school officials to fudge test scores, provide documentation for unearned degrees, or admit unqualified students. Concern over the training of doctors has led the European Union and United States to not recognize the medical degrees of graduates from Ukrainian schools, for example.

No Place for Old Waiters at Texas Roadhouse?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Texas Roadhouse is fighting an EEOC suit that alleges the company discriminates based on age when hiring waiters, waitresses, and other front-of-house restaurant workers. The company notes that its servers must wear jeans, work nights and weekends, and line dance during their shifts. Any observed adverse impact on older workers is related to these job requirements, it argues, so its hiring practices are lawful. The case will test a common defense that businesses need younger employees to attract customers and project their brands’ images, as well as address the underlying question of whether prohibitions against age discrimination apply to all companies, regardless of the youthfulness of their brands.

How EpiPen Became a Hit

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Strong marketing turned EpiPen from a commodity into a blockbuster brand for drugmaker Mylan. It also enabled them to raise the price by about 400 percent.

That'll Set You Back At Least $7.3 Billion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The European Union has made a point of separating governments from ownership in companies, and many previously state-owned companies are now public companies. There's a regulation in Germany, however, referred to as the Volkswagen law, that has allowed the government to maintain a direct ownership stake in the company—a so-called "golden share"—that gives it significant say in the operation of the company. Now that Volkswagen has admitted to rigging the software in many of its cars so that they appear to be more efficient and cleaner than they actually are, there are questions as to whether the unique ownership structure of Volkswagen helped allow this situation to come to pass.

Farm to Face

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mutant flowers sounds like a great start to a horror flick, but in this case it may well turn into a business bonanza for the founder of Farmacy.

Was Tom Hayes in Charge of a $350 Trillion Conspiracy? Or Just Taking the Fall for One?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In a UK court, the former UBS trader, Tom Hayes, was found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years in jail for his role in manipulating Libor. Throughout the court case, there was no disputing what Hayes had done. It remains unclear, however, whether Hayes was truly a mastermind behind the Libor manipulations or simply one of a number of participants in an industry-wide practice.

In Japan, Mobile Money is an Also-Ran

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With all its interest in tech gadgets and automation, it's easy to think Japan would be on the forefront of mobile phone and Internet-based banking—but it isn't. In fact, Japan has one of the lower rates of mobile banking adoption in the world behind India and Nigeria. Japanese customers have a preference for cash, and visiting luxurious bank branches to access their cash.

Afghan Immigrants Want OT for Training Marines

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tatitlek Support Services workers are claiming back pay for overtime and break time that they should have been given under California labor laws. These workers spent up to two weeks at a time living on a Marine Corps base while participating in training exercises teaching U.S. troops how to interact with Afghan and Iraqi populations. Tatitlek is arguing that federal laws, rather than California’s stricter labor laws, apply since the exercises took place on federal military bases.

In Africa, New Winners and Losers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While it is common to think of Africa as a continent poised for growth, the situation differs across many of its fifty-five countries. The falling price of oil has meant that oil-exporting countries (e.g., Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) are seeing much lower revenues. Meanwhile, countries that depended on minerals and other commodity sales to China have also seen growth slow. But both the Democratic Republic of Congo and Ethiopia are expected to have more than 8 percent GDP growth this year. As a result, there are still good investment opportunities in Africa, depending on the country and the sector of the economy.

Uber by Way of the Kibbutz

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New Israeli ride-hailing service La’Zooz is a cooperative that relies on volunteers for coding. Riders pay with bitcoin-like tokens that can be earned by giving rides or working on the app. A bitcoin developer says La’Zooz has the potential to “eat Uber and Lyft.”

REITS May Not be the Answer for Retailers

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Activist investors say that spinning off or selling properties can boost a company’s stock price and reward investors who would otherwise miss a chance to benefit from record real estate values.

Touch Me Harder

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple’s design team focuses on how it can make products more intuitive and easy to use. The company does not believe in using focus groups to tell the designers what customers want, but believes the skills and instincts of designers will be able to provide software and hardware that customers will want to use.

A Founder Who Wants to Stay in the Kitchen

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chobani's founder, Hamdi Ulukaya, helped the company bring Greek yogurt to the U.S. market. The company has weathered struggles with meeting production demands and quality control during a period of rapid growth. While some expected Ulukaya to be ousted, he remains CEO. Ulukaya has learned, however, that the company needs an executive with managerial skills that differ from his own.

Stetson’s Cowboy Spirit Lives On

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The once-famous Stetson hat company is struggling. To keep the company relevant, CEO Izumi Kajimoto is no longer relying on cowboy culture. Instead, Stetson is pursuing the hipster market by offering an eclectic, trendy mix of hats.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bollywood film studio Eros hopes to build a strong enough position in video streaming to fend off Netflix and Amazon when they enter India. With a large library of its own films, original programs, music videos, and a head start, Eros wants to be the dominant streaming service in India.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Eros is one of Bollywood's largest studios, releasing around 70 movies a year. Hoping to attain a first-mover advantage in advance of foreign rivals such as Amazon and Netflix, Eros is launching a video streaming service.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

High prices for milk last year caused farmers in many countries to invest in increased production.This year, with markets slowing in China and trade tensions with Russia, global trade in dairy products is down. Hence, dairy farmers worldwide are in a tough financial bind.

Touch Me Harder

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Understanding and maximizing the touch response of an iPhone screen can cost millions (or billions) of dollars, as Apple found out in building 3D Touch.

Just a Fantasy

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Daily fantasy sports sites are exempt from restrictions on sports betting. Instead, they are considered games of skill and not gambling. FanDuel and DraftKings, the two main services, will bring in a combined $60 million in entry fees in the first week of the NFL season. Sports books in Las Vegas, by contrast, are expected to handle about $30 million.

Cute Ads Only Go So Far

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Affordable Care Act created an opening for new health insurance companies to enter the market by lowering some of the barriers. But well-funded startup Oscar is losing a lot of money while it tries to reach scale and a competitive cost position.

Hampton Creek Throws Eggs at the FDA

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hampton Creek’s Josh Tetrick is taking a stand against the FDA. The FDA issued a warning letter listing a number of rule violations related to the company’s Just Mayo product. Among these violations is the company’s use of the term “mayo” in the product’s name and the image of an egg on its label. The FDA asserts this is a violation if its standard-of-identity rules and can be misleading, since the product is eggless. Tetrick ‘s defiant stance stems from more than financial incentives; it is rooted in the company’s commitment to make the global food system more sustainable by developing plant-based substitutes for animal proteins. Thus, the regulatory dispute has issues of principle and may have implications for the evolution of the food industry.

Portuguese Shoemakers Get Fancy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shoemaking companies in Portugal are performing well financially as they move up-market. While they can not compete on price with Asian manufacturers, they can compete on quality and have found a profitable market position between high-end Italian shoes and lower-priced Asian models. Some have also added their own brands while continuing to operate as contract manufacturers for more famous labels.

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Forget about streaming video or downloading or uploading large files if you live in Cuba. With fewer than 4 percent of homes having access to the Internet, Cuba has some of the worst Internet access in the world. How does Castro’s government respond to the market demand for better Internet access and control access to information?

Cute Ads Only Go So Far

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Oscar, a startup healthcare insurance provider designed for individual customers, is losing money rapidly. Instead of folding, though, the company is expanding.

Making Qatar's Skies Friendlier for Employees

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Qatar Airways expects to hire about 6,000 more flight attendants over the next two years, many of whom will come from other countries. When hiring flight attendants, the company tries to make clear that its employees are required to adhere to certain cultural norms of the conservative Middle Eastern country and that the job may not be right for everyone. The company recently relaxed rules related to marriage and pregnancy, but Western workers might find some remaining rules to be odd or discriminatory.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Making Qatar's Skies Friendlier for Employees

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While policies on marriage and pregnancy have recently been relaxed, Qatar Airways' flight attendants still must abide by some rules that are consistent with local middle eastern culture but different from the rules of many international airlines. Qatar Airways pays well by industry standards and provides free housing to its employees. With the company planning to hire another 6,000 flight attendants over the next two years, it's making some changes to its policies while also trying to make sure applicants know what is expected in a conservative middle-eastern culture.

Britain's Digital-Health Startups Seek First Aid

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Regardless of where innovation is generated, it will seek its highest potential returns wherever they may exist across the globe. Due to revenue constraints, British healthcare innovators are beginning to seek and find funding (as well as markets) in the United States before looking at home.

Things Are About to Get Ugly at Kraft

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

3G Capital and Warren Buffett are focused on cost-cutting and operational efficiency to boost profits at moribund Kraft. But analysts are concerned about the long-term value of the firm's brands in the evolving packaged-foods industry.

A Breakout Year for Cuban Entrepreneurs

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is Cuba now a capitalist or socialist society? Although 201 categories of work are now open to entrepreneurs in the country, the state still dominates the economy.

Insider Trading Then and Now

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Insider trading, or making stock transactions on soon-to-happen information, is both illegal and lucrative. Hacking has changed the way insider traders operate. U.S. authorities say hackers illegally accessed 150,000 news releases, an example of a new form of insider trading.

Greece Gets Something Right!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Greece trails Spain and Italy in olive oil production, but is poised for a good year in 2015. A drought in Spain has led to a large drop in production, and bad weather, fruit flies, and a disease have all contributed to a decrease in Italian output.

The Plum China Posting That's Turned Sour

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As an expatriate, being assigned to lead sales in the largest and fastest-growing international market would seem like a good thing. For Citroen's Sabine Scheunert, the dream job has turned into a real challenge as China's auto market has cooled. The downturn has led to dealerships needing to offer significant discounts to move inventory, and Scheunert's challenge is amplified due to evolving consumer preferences.

The Arctic or Bust

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shell has resumed drilling in the arctic sea after years of legal battles and weather-related disasters. Despite the risks and the current glut of oil, Shell believes it is fulfilling its responsibility to provide oil the world will need.

How Google Lost Europe

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's search engine is very popular in Europe, as is the Android operating system. European opinion leaders have heaped praise on the company for its stance on free speech and human rights. But Google also has its critics and detractors who believe the company has used its dominant position in the search market to push its own services at the expense of other websites. The search engine giant is now facing increasing criticism in Europe and potential fines for its business practices.

A Technology That Reveals Your Feelings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Do you think you can fool your teacher when you’re not paying attention? Think again. Plans are in place for as many as 1,000 schools in North America to use a technology that monitors student’s emotions. This market could reach $10 billion worldwide by 2020 and raises questions about privacy.

Diebold’s New Executive Suite

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When Diebold CEO Andy Mattes assembled his management team at Diebold, he decided it didn't really matter where people lived and didn't expect them to move to Canton, Ohio, where Diebold is headquartered. Thus, various senior managers live in cities across the country and have regular conference calls. Since many executives spend much of their time traveling anyway, Mattes decided it was more important to hire the best people rather than the best people willing to move to Canton.

Cleaning Up Drug Lane

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Unregulated supply chains and poor record keeping make it easy for counterfeit drugs to find their way into stores in many developing countries. MPedigree, a Ghana-based company, works with manufacturers to place scratch-off security codes on drug boxes to help consumers find out if the product is legitimate.

Priority Mail

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Claiming the largest share of Amazon’s business and looking to grow, the United States Postal Service has become a formidable competitor to FedEx and UPS. But that all depends on continued government support.

Making the Seas Safer for Fishermen

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Commercial fishing remains one of the most dangerous occupations in the country. Nevertheless, the government has been slow to develop safety regulations in line with the Coast Guard Authorization Act.

Cleaning Up Drug Lane

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Counterfeit drugs are a critical issue in many developing countries, as unregulated supply chains and poor record keeping make it easy for bootleggers to slip fake products into supply chains. The results can be life-threatening for customers who rely on the efficacy of drugs.

The New Old Windows

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With operating system revenue falling from $19 billion to $15 billion over the last two years, Microsoft is trying to turn around this slide with the introduction of Windows 10. On July 21, the company announced a record $3.2 billion quarterly loss on $22.2 billion in revenue. Infamous for disastrous OS introductions, will Windows 10 be the success Microsoft needs?

The New Old Windows

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Microsoft tries to win fans and improve its bottom line with a Windows operating system redo and ventures into non-OS products and services.

For European Biotechs, Patience Starts to Pay

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The development of new drugs is a long process, requiring years of research and testing before products can be released. New companies require significant capital to carry them through years of expenses before they generate revenue. In Europe, more firms are now turning to initial public offerings, and investors are more willing to provide capital with the hope that a new drug will pay off big.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Growth in China’s market of 400 million smartphone users has almost flattened, leaving manufacturers scrambling.The decline is particularly bad news for Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi, which has been dependent upon the rapidly growing domestic market.

They Come to Bury Gold, Not to Praise It

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gold prices have tumbled to a five-year low and analysts are predicting they will fall even lower by December. The drop is due in part to the high likelihood that the Fed will increase interest rates this year, which will draw investors away from gold and into bonds.

The Google Tamer

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google is known for innovation and a freewheeling culture that has contributed to its consistent record of growth. And as long as ad revenues have continued to grow, so has spending. Ruth Porat, who became CFO in May, is now trying to bring financial discipline and efficiency to Google without stifling its creative culture.

The Google Tamer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google has brought in Ruth Porat, an almost 30-year veteran of Wall Street, as its CFO. Under her stewardship, expenses are leveling off and Google's stock price is on the rise.

Big Data: Searching for Drug Side Effects

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Millions of people search online for information about symptoms and prescription drugs. Patterns in their searches might reveal previously unknown side effects of medications.

Innovation: Child Prostheses

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

E-Nable designs 3D-printed prostheses for children older than 3 and shares its blueprints so they can be made for as little as $30. This way, the prostheses can be easily replaced as the kids outgrow them.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The large smartphone companies have done well in recent years, with rising sales and profits. Part of the reason for their success is the growing market for smartphones in China. However, the smartphone market in China may be reaching saturation, with most consumers who want and can afford a smartphone already owning one.

'OK, Ready for Work Again!!!'

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shigenobu Nagamori started Nidec in 1973, and turned his small motor-making business into one of Japan’s most profitable multinational corporations. Nagamori, who has been recognized as one of Japan’s top business leaders, has an uncommon leadership style: He emphasizes motivation, dedication, and hard work over talent and intelligence.

Identity Thief for Hire

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As a young man in Belarus, Dmitry Naskovets wasn't a computer whiz, but his English language skills made him valuable for answering credit-card and banking security questions triggered by fraudulent transactions. While identity theft is clearly illegal, in the eyes of this young man it was different from more violent crimes.

The Whiff of Price-Fixing Is Up In the Air

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mergers have reduced the U.S. airline industry to just four major carriers. Profits are way up. And there is open talk of capacity discipline among airline executives. Now the Justice Department is investigating for possible collusion.

A Chinese Lender Bets on East Coast Golf

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

South Carolina's Grand Strand is dotted with golf courses, condos, and resorts. After some recent acquisitions, China-based Yiqian Funding now owns 22 of the golf courses and is adding to its real estate holdings. Yiqian's goals include increasing the number of Chinese tourists, and potential condo owners, to the area.

Fiat Positions Maserati to Replace Ferrari

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ferrari, Fiat’s top luxury brand, is being spun off. Fiat is planning to fill the vacuum of the iconic Ferrari brand with Maserati. One of the challenges for Maserati is finding a way to broaden its appeal without chipping away at exclusivity.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Disney is applying what it learned from the problems it had establishing a park France as it develops the $5.5 billion Shanghai Disneyland. The goal is to build something that is authentically Disney and distinctly Chinese. The demographics are quite different, and adult visitors may outnumber kids four to one. Will Disney’s largest foreign investment to date pay off?

The Trouble With Twitter’s CEO Search

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Twitter is looking for a new CEO, but the search is complicated three former CEOs who once ran the company are on its board. It may prove difficult to attract a new leader, as it will be difficult to run a company while reporting to former CEOs, two of whom also founded the company. The complex and fiery relationships between the three does little to ease the challenges that a new CEO will face.

HSBC Managers Battle the Cleanup Squad

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To avoid criminal charges for banking rule violations related to money laundering, HSBC signed a deferred prosecution agreement promising to improve controls and compliance systems designed to reduce the risk of financial crimes. A report by the HSBC’s court-appointed monitor, however, raises questions about the bank’s compliance with this agreement as well as its attitude toward reform.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Saying it has learned from experience in Paris and Hong Kong, Disney has gone to much greater lengths to tailor its new park in Shanghai to Chinese culture and society. Yet retaining an authentic Disney experience may be key to succeeding in China’s increasingly competitive amusement-park industry.

A Different Kind of Ride-Sharing

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As legislators in various markets come to grips with the lost revenue within the taxi service sector due to Uber and Lyfts, the business model is now shifting to avoid these issues and it is not being accomplished by the incumbent firms, but by other startups. One major player is Bla-Bla Car, which uses a ride-sharing model versus a ride-for-hire model.

Planting Seeds Against The Cuban Embargo

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The farm lobby in Washington proved successful in getting legislation passed in 2000 that allowed agricultural exports to Cuba. Under the guise of humanitarian goals, agricultural companies could ship goods (primarily grain) to Cuba as long as no government financing was used. With the potential for more open trade between the United States and Cuba, the lobbying efforts have increased, although not everyone is pushing for open trade in agriculture between the countries.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Disney is preparing to open a new theme park outside Shanghai that blends standard Disney features with Chinese themes. It also has to adapt to the Chinese demographic, where, as a result of the one-child policy, it is expected that there will be four adults for every one child at the park.

Drop and Give Me Twenty Lines of Code

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The armed forces are recruiting hackers for cyberwar. The recruits use open source software such as Metasploit.

A Tech Ecosystem Built on Rubble

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A pioneering startup accelerator is building businesses in one of the world’s toughest places. The drive and focus of the citizens in the Gaza Strip is helping create a tech hub there.

It Turns Out Rare Earths Aren’t That Rare

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rare-earth prices jumped as much as sixfold in 2011. However, they crashed soon after, leading to the bankruptcy of U.S. miner Molycorp. The rare-earths commodity bubble burst when their scarcity was short-lived.

Can DuPont Spin Off Its Liabilities?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

DuPont has completed the spin-off of its major chemical operations. The new company, Chemours, inherited thirty-seven active chemical plants with products that generated 19 percent of DuPont's revenues. Chemours also inherited 62 percent of DuPont's environmental liabilities. The spin-off raises questions about DuPont's responsibility to meet obligations arising from decades of pollution.

Macrobrewery: Can Craft Beer Survive AB InBev?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is AB InBev acquiring craft brewers to strengthen the segment or put them out of business?

Die Grundertrainerin Will See You Now

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You have to be crazy to begin a startup. Can I be your therapist?

The Promise and Peril of Crispr

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A gene-editing technique could provide inexpensive cures to diseases, but ethical and regulatory concerns may discourage investment and slow the development of treatments.

How Much Should a Miracle Cost?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The company selling a costly breakthrough to millions of hepatitis C sufferers thinks price is the wrong thing to talk about.

The Student Debt Collection Mess

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With securitized loans, sloppy record keeping, and allegations of abusive debt-collection tactics, some question whether the student loan market will be another mortgage crisis.

Startups See Dollars in China's Young and Lonely

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Seeking romance and love in modern day China. There has to be an app for that. Or two or three.

A Bay Area Startup Spins Lab-Grown Silk

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bolt Threads expects products made with its yeast cell-based silk to be available in 2016.

Nintendo Tries to Get Back in the Game

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nintendo was once ahead of the pack on the competitive gaming, and now the struggling company is playing catch-up. Game over?

The Rise of the National Trading House

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

More countries are starting or purchasing trading companies to help serve national interests for the export or import of commodities.

L.A. Fans Pray for an NFL Team of Their Own

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Two Los Angeles suburbs have approved big-ticket stadium projects in the hope of luring an NFL team.

The Law Comes for FIFA

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After a raid and seven arrests, questions of bribery and corruption surround the organization that runs global soccer.

Big Pharma and Insurers Play Nice

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Both sides aim to reduce the sticker shock of new specialized drugs.

Some Falafel Shops Go Better With Coca-Cola

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Coke offers small restaurants in Germany access to an app that will facilitate online ordering of food and beverages.

Arne vs. The Students

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The students who attended Corinthian Colleges are seeking debt relief in bankruptcy.

Snapchat’s Long Game

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Snapchat SEO Evan Spiegel says he has a better way for advertisers to reach millennials and teens than TV or social networks.

Takata Could Use an Air Bag of Its Own

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Takata expanded its recall of defective air bags to 34 million vehicles. Analysts say that could cost it $2.5 billion.

A Chinese Phone Aimed at Hipsters

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New startup OnePlus' business relies on word of mouth abroad.

The $5 Billion Sublet

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is WeWork a real estate company with a tech-bubble valuation, or a brilliant new office space?

The Agency That Barely Moves

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The SEC is paralyzed by politics and poor leadership, according to staffers.

The Agency That Barely Moves

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gridlock at the SEC? Mary Jo White's two-year tenure heading the commission has been marked largely by political discord and paralysis rather than accomplishments.

Dubai Tries to Squeeze its A380s Into Formation

Eric Cardella  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Dubai International Airport seeks new ways to handle more superjumbo jets to cope with increased passenger traffic

This Time, It’s HR Getting Fired

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Zenefits has raised almost $600 million for its centralized small business HR software.

China Does an About-Face on GMOs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To cut back on imports and boost domestic agricultural productivity, China is opening up to more GMOs.

Nestle's Peace Offering in California's Water War

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nestle takes steps to reduce water usage at its factories while facing criticism for selling bottled water.

Shareholders Revolt Against Dark Money

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should utilities disclose contributions to nonprofit advocacy groups, including groups that oppose the development of alternative energy?

Minding the Family Store for the Next Generation

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A century-old retail business lays the groundwork for succession.

Whole Foods or Walmart?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sales growth at established Whole Foods stores has slowed to 3.6 percent, far below the pace of organics overall. Who is eating their organic lunch?

The Dilemma of Digital Free Trade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can data that is stored in another country be kept safe and private?

Daimler Veers Into Maximum Overdrive

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Daimler's self-driving trucks are now being tested in Nevada.

Marijuana Tracking Goes Corporate

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The cost of legal sales of marijuana—does it sometimes leave opportunity for illegal entrepreneurs?

The First Rate-Rigging Trial Begins in London

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although billions of dollars in fines have been levied, traders who allegedly rigged Libor are just coming to trial.

Lessons From China's Counterfeit Crackdown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese online retailers take steps to curb the sales of counterfeit goods on their websites.

Turning Drilling Waste Into Clean Energy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Oil companies can use geothermal energy from drilling wastewater as a source of power.

Dear Microsoft . . .

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Do Silicon Valley tech companies use a permanent tier of second-class workers?

A Home Shortage Amid Hawaii’s Building Boom

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Developers on Oahu try to balance opportunities to offer tourists high-priced condos with the need for affordable housing for locals.

China Won’t Let Toyota Ditch Its Electric Cars

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China may be the new California as its policies drive automakers to produce EVs.

China Won't Let Toyota Ditch Its Electric Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Toyota bets on hydrogen over electric power for autos, in China it is selling electric cars to win favor with the government.

Lending Club Wants to Broaden Its Membership

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Let's just borrow money from 20,000 small lenders rather than a bank.

Small Business Finds Its Voice in Free Trade

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is creating opportunities for a few individual small businesses at the same time we create huge benefits to large businesses overseas a solid strategy for entrepreneurial proponents?

Not So Bad After All

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

BP has paid billions of dollars for the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, but environmental damage has been far less than many feared.

On the Java Sea, a New Shenzhen is Born

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As labor costs rise in China, Indonesia tries to attract manufacturers.

P&G Stops Making Sense

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will major reductions in Procter & Gamble's product line make it more competitive?

Innovation: Pentagrom Screen

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Learning guitar is easy when you can see the music.

State-Owned Areva is Leaking Cash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

France's attempt to make money selling nuclear power plants has fallen flat.

Japan's Amazon Has Bigger Dreams

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan’s dominant e-commerce company, Rakuten, is trying to become a global competitor through acquisitions.

The Secret Sauce

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How Buffalo Wild Wings turned the sports bar into a $1.5 billion juggernaut.

Big Pharma’s Patent Wars

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pharmaceutical companies' patent tactics face legal scrutiny.

JPMorgan Algorithm Knows You’re a Rogue Employee Before You Do

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can JPMorgan's predictive monitoring identify a rogue employee before a violation occurs?

Japan's Amazon has Bigger Dreams

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Having gained a strong position in Japan, Rakuten is making acquisitions internationally to spur growth.

Drone Makers Seek Traffic Control

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Commercial drones are still mostly illegal in the U.S., but the industry and NASA are working to keep them from colliding.

Exxon Needs Friends in High Places

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Exxon's big bets in Russia can't pay off until sanctions are lifted.

Drone Makers Seek Traffic Control

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

NASA-backed software could orchestrate urban skies.

Oklahoma Shakes: Big Oil’s Link to Big Quakes

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Did oil company executives pressure scientists about potential links between tracking and earthquakes?

Airbnb Drops in on Cuba

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Airbnb works to overcome hurdles to open the Cuban rental market.

Seattle: Kurt Cobain, Coffee, and Data Storage

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sometimes conventional wisdom can take an unconventional turn.

A Virtual Garage Sale Takes on Craigslist

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Startup VarageSale competes with Craigslist by focusing on mobile and has raised $34 million in venture funding.

Ordinary Investors Now Have an Advantage Over the Pros

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Negative interest rates offer an advantage for individual investors.

Rethinking the Shift-To-Bonds Strategy

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There used to be a simple rule for retirement savers: The percentage of bonds in your portfolio should match your age. That no longer applies.

The U.S. Pushes Thailand to Clean Up Tuna Inc.

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. State Department and multinational retailers are taking steps to address human trafficking and poor working conditions in Thai factories.

Japanese Engineers Reinvent the Wheel

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Two inventors found it easier to build $7,900 bike wheels than to sell them.

Coke's Unlikely Savior

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Coke and Pepsi may be allies in the latest battle to win back consumers.

Bank Customers May Get Their Day in Court

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau takes aim at contract clauses that bar class-action suits.

The Cybersleuth Who Saunas with Russian Spies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Many cybersecurity firms work with governments, but close ties between Kaspersky and the Russian government are causing concern.

The U.S. Pushes Thailand to Clean Up Tuna Inc.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Human trafficking and migrant laborers have cast a shadow on Thailand's tuna industry.

Coke’s Unlikely Savior

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. cola consumption is falling by about 4 percent a year. Soda makers are seeking new sweeteners to reverse the trend.

The Not-So-Almighty Dollar

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There’s no reason for all the hand-wringing about the strong greenback.

For Apple, Only Time Will Tell In China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China may prove to the big market for Apple's most expensive watches.

Paying by the Second, Instead of the Click

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You can resume your game after the advertisement is complete.

Making Washington Fall in Love With Pizza Again

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The $37 billion pizza industry wants Congress to roll back regulations designed to get Americans to eat fewer slices.

Can You Spot the Difference?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should new autoworkers be second-class citizens?

One Hot List You Don't Want to Be On

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. Trade Representative's "notorious markets" list uses a name-and-shame approach to address intellectual property theft.

Innovation: Crash-Proof Drone

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new specially designed drone can safely bounce off obstacles and people without damage or injury.

One Hot List You Don't Want to Be On

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A U.S. government report names names in the business of fakes.

Meet Death, Buy His Raincoat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Celebrating a melancholy mood helps Stutterheim sell high-priced Swedish raincoats.

The Pipeline Flows Again

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Big Pharma companies are competing to produce breakthrough drugs that no one can afford.

On Payday Loans, Churches Ask, “WWJD?”

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Alabama's Baptists get behind a lobbying push for rate caps.

Stockpickers Say They'll Be Back

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Only 20 percent of nonindex mutual funds investing in U.S. stocks beat their benchmarks in 2014.

The Tech Tastemaker You Can Game

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

User-ranked listings site Product Hunt attracts venture capitalists.

How Kellogg Lost Breakfast

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The American breakfast experience has changed, and Kellogg is in trouble.

How Productive is the U.S.?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The little-understood measure is crucial to managing the economy.

Intel Buys Its Way Deeper Into China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The company is spending billions on factories and state-owned rivals.

Get Out the Way

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New CAFE standards no longer constrain the number of big trucks a company can sell, and the trucks are getting bigger.

The Cat Content Wars

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It's a dog-eat-dog world in publishing, but that's not a bad thing for this company.

The Clutter in Kip Tindell

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can the Container Store maintain its commitment to conscious capitalism and keep shareholders happy, too?

Pizza Hut Wants to Roll Its Dough in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Africa, Pizza Hut can't be the cheapest or the first pizza chain, so it wants to be the best.

The Case of the Stubbed Hub

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Do consumers really want to know the price they're paying?

Will Etsy Come Undone By Success?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pressure from stockholders may change the character of craft website Etsy after its upcoming IPO.

Walking Away From Clean Coal

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Obama administration cut off support for a clean-coal plant, making it harder to meet ambitious emissions goals.

Unconstrained Funds, Contstrained Returns

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Flexible bond funds lagged their more traditional peers last year.

Changing Flags to Use India’s Ship Graveyard

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rather than shifting demolition work to safer and cleaner shipbreakers, recent EU regulations may be fueling the growth of India’s dangerous and dirty shipbreaking industry.

It's Raining Cars in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The booming market for autos in China has caused automakers to expand capacity faster than the demand warrants.

Changing Flags to Use India's Ship Graveyard

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Old European ships find their way to scrapyards in India, working around EU regulations.

Innovation: Power Fingerprinting

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Two academics have created a security system that is practically impossible to evade.

Who Doesn’t Love a Discount? The Taxman

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Expedia has taken an aggressive position on local hotel taxes and may face a tax bill of $847 million.

Subterranean Sprawl

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kansas City's Sub Tropolis, a subterranean industrial park, takes advantage of natural energy and climate advantages to attract tenants.

Small to Big: I Do Now I Don't

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

All is not lost. That engagement ring is still worth something.

Cambodia's Wages Rise, Orders Don't

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rising wages in Cambodia cause multinationals to look elsewhere for cheap labor.

Need Some Shut-Eye? Try a Spritz of Melatonin

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Startup Sprayable seeks to take customers from wide awake to deep sleep.

Whole Foods, Half Off

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Whole Foods, unaffectionately known as "Whole Paycheck," had a lousy 2014. The elite grocer says it is ready to compete like a big-box chain.

Whole Foods, Half Off

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How is Whole Foods planning to maintain its profitability in the face of increasing competition?

Whole Foods, Half Off

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Whole Foods is responding to competition with moves that mirror the competition's tactics, such as cutting prices.

Hop In and Shove Over

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Uber and Lyft are introducing true ride-sharing services, social and environmental benefits may follow.

Innovation: Health-Monitoring Tattoo

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An engineer has created a temporary tattoo that can monitor your blood sugar without needles.

Why Brands Love China's Sex And The City

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Western brands vie for product placement on China's hit shows, and often don't even have to pay for the publicity.

The CEO Who Saved a Life and Lost His Job

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A family's social media campaign for access to an experimental drug highlights the conflicting moral obligations of patients' families and drug companies.

Charlie Rose Talks to Stella McCartney

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How much does genealogy matter in entrepreneurial endeavors?

Why Target is Raking Up Its Maple Leaves

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Target has admitted failure and is pulling back from its first international expansion into Canada.

Why Target is Raking Up Its Maple Leaves

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Target is cutting its losses and exiting the Canadian market.

Mother of a Problem

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There are only two countries in the world that don’t have some form of legally protected, partially paid time off for working women who’ve just had a baby: Papua New Guinea and the U.S.

Mother of a Problem

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Unless you work for a company that voluntarily offers it, or in one of three states, paid maternity leave doesn't exist in the U.S.

Felon or Mark?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An outspoken advocate of ethics and fighting corruption is now facing trial for bribery. Is Joe Sigelman guilty or a scapegoat?

China Dealerships Flex Their Muscles

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese car dealerships battle with car makers over growth and margins.

Hardware: Apple Sneaks Up on Cheaper PCs

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite a significant drop in worldwide PC shipments over the last year, Apple is gaining in the category.

The Working Poor Confound the Experts

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Labor force participation by lower-income families has risen sharply.

Wipe Off That Smile

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Members-only online discount retailer, Jet.com, will launch this January and compete on price with industry giants Amazon and eBay.

A Retirement Toast

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The wage gap is just the start. A combination of the demise of traditional pensions for rank-and-file employees and lucrative deferred compensation plans for executives is making an even larger retirement savings gap.

India's Discount Airlines Get An Upscale Rival

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's airlines have lost $10 billion over the past seven years, but that doesn't keep more airlines from entering the market.

Innovation: All-in-One Earbuds

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

If you can't have everything between your ears, you can at least have it all in your ear.

Amazon Sorts Itself Out for the Holidays

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New facilities are supposed to prevent delivery disappointments.

The Change-the-World Capital of the World

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nairobi is a vibrant environment for young expat entrepreneurs and social enterprises.

Pay Up, You Stingy Nerds

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Marc Benioff is pushing his fellow tech billionaires into giving back to San Francisco.

Opening Remarks: Cuba Isn't Libre Yet

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Major obstacles remain despite President Obama reducing travel, trade, and banking restrictions with Cuba.

Juts Do It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fraudbusters are cracking down on fake goods in China.

Amazon Sorts Itself Out for the Holidays

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon has almost doubled the number of its sorting centers to avoid hiccups in holiday deliveries.

Growing Your Apps in Isolation

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Creating value and getting wealthy are not necessarily connected.

The World's Biggest Car Company Wants to Get Rid of Gasoline

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will electric vehicles become a thing of the past? Toyota has a vision that its hydrogen vehicle will become the first mass-market hydrogen car.

The Greatest Tax Story Ever Told

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are tax-motivated corporate inversions unethical or smart?

Time to Make the Nutella-Filled Doughnuts

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Dunkin' Donuts expands internationally, it localizes its product offerings.

Now at the Sands: Iranian Hackers in Every Server

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Increasing cybersecurity is one way for U.S. corporations to respond to hackers who can cripple operations and steal valuable data. Should corporations also be able to retaliate?

Man Buys Phone, Gets a Brick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Websites, warehouses, and shipping companies in India can't keep up with e-commerce demand.

The Big Business of Selling Rx Records

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Medical data analytics will surpass $10 billion in annual revenue by 2020. A new technique allows advertising to know exactly which drugs you're taking and to share it on the Internet. With everyone.

How CEOs Became Beholden to Shareholders

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shareholder value can't be maximized by focusing on profits alone.

Bob Costas on Baseball Free Agency's Evolution

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some fans thought it meant the end of baseball. But free agency proved to make baseball fairer . . . and maybe even a little more interesting.

Outsourcing: Loss of U.S. Manufacturing Jobs Picked Up Speed

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Outsourcing has been taking place for longer than most U.S. college students have been alive.

Twenty Years of Techron Yield Unclear Results

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chevron continues to spend large sums on R&D and the marketing of its fuel additive Techron although the competition has similar additives and consumers are more focused on price.

India's Farming Women Pick Up the Cameras

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is there a prejudicial element in gender-based assistance programs for agricultural improvement?

What Do Video Games Have Against Women?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although a media critic is harassed for challenging sexism in video games, the industry's lack of inclusiveness may hurt its future.

Ordinary Russians Suffer Ruble Shock

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The declining value of the Russian ruble is making imports more expensive, thus impacting consumer spending and importers' business.

Merchants Try to Trim Many Unhappy Returns

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Holiday return rates are three times the usual, costing sellers billions of dollars.

The Stockpicker's Last Stand

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After suffering outflows of $250 billion from 2008 through 2013, Capital Group is still trying to convince investors that traditional stockpicking, if practiced by the right people, can beat the market averages over the long haul.

The Whale Stays in the Picture

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can SeaWorld overcome the backlash over its treatment of marine animals?

Plastic That Carries a Big Charge

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An engineer has developed a 3D-printing plastic he claims can be used to print electronics.

Makeup For Cool Girls

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Entering the makeup market from the blogosphere.

Port Dispute May Mean No Christmas in Hawaii

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Overstaffing at some ports is leading to a work slowdown, affecting imports and exports.

In India, Amazon and Its Rivals Tread Lightly

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Amazon and local e-commerce firms in India try to work around rules designed to protect small shopkeepers from foreign-backed retailers.

Bangladesh’s Toxic Tanneries

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bangladesh exports leather, but the environmental and health costs remain local.

Bangladesh's Toxic Tanneries

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bangladesh's $1 billion leather export industry is hazardous for workers.

Persuading Israel's Tech Firms to IPO at Home

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Entrepreneurs prefer to list their companies' shares in the U.S.

Ericsson Looks for a Home in the Cloud

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Ericsson's network equipment sales slow, it looks to develop new revenue streams in the cloud.

Nonprofits Can't Afford San Francisco

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Office rents have doubled since 2009 as startups crowd in.

Me? Yes, Taylor.

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The most influential artist in the music industry is young, successful, and confronting the streaming music format.

Wal-Mart's Organic Surge

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Wal-Mart and Wild Oats plan to lower the price of organic food and bring it to the masses.

Expert Outlook: Kevin Plank

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A great innovative company doesn't rely on its early success for extension; it leans on its brand reputation.

India vs. China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India is becoming increasingly attractive to manufacturers, although it is still in need of infrastructure improvements.

Coal Lobbies for More Time to Burn

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Coal producers and utility companies are trying to slow implementation of the EPA's plan to limit power plant emissions.

Warning: May Contain Shrapnel

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Takata has a reputation for innovative technology and improvements to auto safety. Nevertheless, the company, auto manufacturers, and regulators all face increasing pressure regarding air bag safety and recalls.

Tim Cook Speaks Up

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tim Cook lays a brick in the "sunlight path toward justice."

Salmon Farmers Hail the "Supercycle"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Worldwide demand for salmon is growing faster than it can be produced in Chile, Norway, Canada, and the United States.

Laundry Detergent Makers Want More Suds

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. laundry detergent sales fell 6.4 percent from 2009 to 2013 and are expected to keep falling through 2018.

Home-Care Aides Get a Raise - At a Price

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pay rates for home-care aides highlight competing social priorities.

The Latest Rate Dip Spurs a Refinance Rush

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Demand for mortgage refinancing is soaring after 30-year mortgage rates drop below 4 percent, but they won't stay there very long.

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Once the market leader in both China and India, Samsung phones are losing marketshare to cheaper models.

Can Google Be as Shiny as You-Know-Who?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Android Lollipop and new Nexus devices will have trouble drawing buzz away from Apple.

Facing America’s Other Middle-Class Squeeze

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Defined-contribution retirement plans offer U.S. corporations cost savings today, but are the long-term social costs untenable?

Big Money Advice For Small Investors

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You don’t need $100 billion in assets to invest like someone who does.

Datsun's Second Life Isn't So Good, After All

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Resurrected in emerging markets, Datsun's cars are viewed as too cheap.

How to Manage Data Like Facebook

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Husband-and-wife startup Interana is applying lessons from Facebook to join the $38 billion data-analysis market.

Stopping Bankers Before They Stray

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Banks hope to prevent misdeeds by using sophisticated software to monitor employee communications.

Work is a Pleasure

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Watching pornography at work is common, but it is also time theft.

Side Effects May Include Large Profits

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An Israeli startup is courting Wall Street clients with a service that aggregates patient conversations about drugs.

Fracking's Funny Numbers

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In a review of drillers’ data, the resources touted to investors average 6.6 times higher than those reported to the SEC.

Marchionne's Last Lap

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fiat tries to reconfigure its product lineup to find the right niches in markets worldwide.

Just Relax

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Thync will soon launch a device to relax or energize you via small jolts of electricity to your brain.

Africa Is Bigger Than You Think

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sub-Saharan countries are recalculating their GDP.

Intel Inside

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Intel wants to make sure it's part of the “Next Big Thing,” which may be the “Internet of Things.”

Adidas's World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Adidas's sales in the United States are down 14 percent this year due to weak sales in basketball and golf.

A Subprime Market Grows in the Shadows

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A lack of transparency creates opportunities for fraud in the subprime auto-loan market.

Can Renault Keep Dacia Cheap?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Low cost auto factories in Eastern Europe create a jobs and export engine for the region.

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

Innovation: Algorithmia

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

We have an algorithm that will solve your problem.

A Bezos-Backed Startup May Go Up Against Amazon

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Jeff Bezos helped give Pro.com its start, and he may be positioning Amazon to compete with it.

Hidden Hand: David Weil

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

David Weil is working to make sure that workers get paid all the wages they are owed.

This Activist Is No Babe in the Woods

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Vani Hari's Foodbabe.com has helped motivate Subway and other companies to change their ingredients, but there may not be much science behind the Web activist's campaigns.

China's New Export: Military in a Box

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's exports of military equipment are growing, as it provides easy-to-use, inexpensive arms to developing countries.

A Showdown Over Housing Discrimination

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. Supreme Court is deciding whether to hear a Texas case involving the use of the disparate impact standard in Fair Housing Act litigation.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Australian exports of coal and minerals to China are falling, while exports of beef are rising.

Drizly Lets You Point, Click, and Drink

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Drizly has an interesting business model to offer alcohol sales and delivery online.

Why Sanctions Won't Stop U.S. Oil Drilling in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sanctions against Russia over its Ukraine policy won't impact a key source of Russian revenue—oil—because the West doesn't want to see higher oil prices.

Drizly Lets You Point, Click, and Drink

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bring me another bottle of vodka. I live at ______________.

Using the Web to Police Dangerous Workplaces

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

OSHA hopes that publicly disclosing workplace injuries will motivate employers to improve safety.

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Direct investment in China is down, as foreign companies face increased scrutiny from the Chinese government.

Is Your Local Craft Beer From Out of State?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are you buying your craft beer from a local source? You may be surprised. Brew Hub plans a five-brewery network that craft brands can use to grow the business far, far away from home.

Southwest Hangs Up Its Low-Cost Jersey

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Southwest has all but lost its position as the cost leader among airlines but has shown no signs of a change in strategy.

Innovation: USB Business Card

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

All you have to do is wave my business card next to your tablet or laptop to find out all about my business.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After success in Scandinavia and Britain, Netflix sets its sights on Germany and France.

How to Buy the Best Stolen Credit Cards

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rescator sells stolen credit cards, but it gets rave reviews for its customer service.

This Apple Was Once Headed To Russia: Not Anymore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As a result of the conflict in Ukraine, exports of many agricultural products from the EU to Russia have stopped, which is good news for EU consumers, bad news for EU farmers.

Updates Available

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. industries have a shot at creating their own “iPhone” by advancing their hardware and software in tandem.

Briefs: No (More) Smoking

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

CVS Caremark has kicked its tobacco habit, and hopes its customers can too.

Using Fishing Nets to Make Carpets Cleaner

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Interface's sales are growing as it makes progress toward eliminating waste and meeting other sustainability goals.

Made in Memphis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rising transportation costs and wage rates in China are causing firms to relocate manufacturing to the Southeast U.S.

Apple's First Responders

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When Apple unveils its new iPhone, its early field failure analysis team will be ready to quickly diagnose any problems.

The Teaching App at the Head of the Class

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Remind, an educational-messaging tool, is among the hottest apps in Apple’s App Store.

Saving an Endangered Fish by Eating More of It

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can Whole Foods help save an endangered Amazonian fish by getting U.S. consumers to eat more of it?

Student Debt

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Older Americans, who hold 5 percent of all U.S. student debt, owe nearly five times as much as they did in 2005.

High-End Motorcycles Meet India's Mopeds

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Erik Buell Racing, maker of powerful trophy motorcycles for the rich, will add low-priced bikes made by Hero MotoCorp of India to its line next year.

The Cookies You Can’t Crumble

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New tracking software and services are reshaping the market for search and display advertising online.

The Hedge Fund and the Despot

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Did a Wall Street titan's money bail out Robert Mugabe in his hour of need?

Google Comes to Pittsburgh

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Does having Google in your city stifle entrepreneurism?

High-End Motorcycles Meet India's Mopeds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India’s largest maker of two-wheeled vehicles is investing $25 million in Erik Buell’s latest bike venture.

The Cookies You Can't Crumble

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google, Facebook, and other startups are finding new ways to collect data for advertisers.

General Electric Wants To Act Like a Startup

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

GE’s new FastWorks program could enable it to do business faster, cheaper, and better and make lean startup the next big management innovation.

Silicon Valley State of Mind

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is Silicon Valley arrogance good, evil, or a bit of both?

As Canadian as Huawei?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Huawei is finding growth opportunities in Canada that it wasn't finding in the United States.

Ben & Jerry's GMO Food Fight

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ben & Jerry's advocacy for GMO labeling puts it at odds with its parent corporation.

Clearance!! Andrew Mason

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can an entrepreneur find adequate impetus to start a new endeavor after "failing" another startup but ending up with a net worth of $400 million-plus?

The Chinese TV Maker Taking Aim at Sony

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hisense is moving up in worldwide market share of television sets and is challenging Sony for the #3 position.

IPOs Are Getting Bigger, Maybe Not Better

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Companies’ average age when going public has hit 11, up from 5 at the height of the dot-com boom.

IPOs Are Getting Bigger, Maybe Not Better

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A trend has developed in which young companies are waiting longer before they go public.

Who's Got the Best Retirement Plan?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some companies offer employees much more generous 401(k) plans than others.

First-World Dog Problems

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Purina claims that Blue Buffalo's image and its business are "built on lies."

Turning Ethiopia Into China's China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Labor costs in Ethiopia are approximately 10 percent of those in China, causing some Chinese companies to shift production to Africa.

Jeff Bewkes’s Disappearing Act

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investors have cheered as Jeff Bewkes systematically dismembered Time Warner and raised the value of its stock. But at what cost?

Tech Giants Struggle to Break Into Cars

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Microchips for cars are a large market poised for strong growth, but big chipmakers like Intel and Qualcomm are just getting started.

A Stock Market Star Implodes in Spain

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Let’s Gowex won numerous awards and its stock price soared until a short-seller revealed that the company was grossly misstating revenues.

You Know You Want Him

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How does a first-generation American move into the role of becoming a highly sought after spokesperson and a business-empire builder? Rapper Pitbull does it one partnership at a time.

Pernod Makes a Little Vodka in a Berlin Garage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Just as some big brewers have found that microbrews have bigger than microprofits, now a multinational spirits company is trying to capitalize on some consumers' preference for locally made vodka.

Flipkart’s Fight to Maintain Its Lead in India

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite trade restrictions that bar foreign retailers, Amazon and EBay have entered the Indian market and are about to overtake Flipkart, the Indian market leader.

Crazed Pervert or Misunderstood Genius?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The ouster of American Apparel's CEO shines a light on the company's uneasy balance of idealistic social responsibility with a variety of transgressions.

Big Enough to Drive a Government Contract Through

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are U.S. companies that avoid U.S. taxes by changing their domiciles to foreign countries good corporate citizens?

Big Enough to Drive a Government Contract Through

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Companies that move offshore to avoid U.S. taxes still get contracts with the government.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The next car an American purchases—even if it has a German or Japanese brand name—might just be made in Mexico.

Flipkart's Fight to Maintain Its Lead in India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Delivering in a city with no street address system. Can it be done?

Sony Bets It Can Find The Next Big Thing

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite mounting losses, Sony is increasing spending on R&D and releasing new products like the SmartBand, which it hopes will be the next big thing.

What Are They Doing at Monsanto?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Monsanto is one of the world's most hated corporations. Is this reputation deserved?

Vietnam's War Over Catfish

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Vietnam is enacting regulations designed to standardize catfish production processes, which will help it gain more export opportunities.

Robots' Best Teachers Are Other Robots

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Researchers are using cloud networks to help robots teach each other skills faster than humans can.

Yes, You Can Be Fired For Being Gay

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although most Americans think it is illegal, in most states someone can be fired for being gay.

Intel’s Big Push for Vietnamese Engineers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Intel has staffed up its plant in Vietnam by sending local students to Oregon for college-level training.

Droid Killer?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cheap smartphones running Firefox's mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

Starbucks, Magna Cum Grande

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Starbucks offers employees tuition support on a grand scale.

If Only They Had Listened...

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Prior to its ongoing ignition switch recall, GM silenced a whistle-blower and his concerns about the company's response to safety issues in its cars and trucks.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

America's Got Milk and China Wants It

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Growing middle-class populations have exploded global demand for dairy products and given U.S. dairy farmers their best performance in decades.

The Conflict Over Conflict-Free Minerals

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although some companies opposed the Dodd-Frank conflict mineral provisions, Intel worked for years to make its global supply chain conflict-free.

The Conflict Over Conflict-Free Minerals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some companies pushed to avoid helping fund Congolese warlords, while industry groups challenge the Dodd-Frank rules.

America's Got Milk and China Wants It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Strong international demand is pushing up global milk prices, creating an opportunity for U.S. dairy farmers.

Will World Cup Sponsors Get Kicked, Too?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Coca-Cola has invested $4 billion this year on marketing as Brazil’s 2014 World Cup, the biggest soccer party on the planet, is now plagued with protests. What will Coke do if things go as badly, as some predict?

Philippine Customs Is Getting Scared Straight

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new customs commissioner is bringing data analysis and an intolerance for corruption to the Philippines.

An Oil Giant Dims the Lights on Green Power

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite financial success with large clean-energy projects, Chevron chooses to curtail funding for its renewable power group.

Philippine Customs Is Getting Scared Straight

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new Philippine customs commissioner is cracking down on bribery and corruption.

Welcome to Thailand, Land of Coups

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Governmental instability in Thailand is dampening foreign investment and economic growth.

Taco Bell’s Secret Recipe for New Products

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Taco Bell’s new-product team considers up to 4,500 ideas each year. Fewer than a dozen of those products actually make it onto the national menu. Will the Waffle Taco be the next hit?

Opening the Door to More College Debt

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Since income and assets aren't considered when approving Parent PLUS loans, it's no surprise that default rates are rising.

The Case for Scrubbing Search Results

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An EU court ruling weighs the right to free speech against individuals’ right to be forgotten.

Streams of Tears

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Streaming music services are having a difficult time capturing any value for themselves or their music suppliers.

The War on English

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's officials know English is essential to further develop their economy on a global level, but they greatly fear the Western values that come with it.

Font Superstars Split

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Longtime font designers Tobias Frere-Jones and Jonathan Hoefler have separated and are in litigation over the nature of their business relationship.

Americans' New Piggy Bank: The 401(k)

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In 2011, Americans took about $57 billion from retirement accounts before they were supposed to.

Americans’ New Piggybank: The 401(k)

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Does the penalty for early withdrawal from 401(k) plans keep taxpayers from withdrawing their savings?

For Bangladeshi Women, Work is Worth the Risks

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hazardous garment factories provide one of the only ways out of poverty for many Bangladeshi women.

For Bangladeshi Women, Work Is Worth the Risks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Working in poor conditions in the garment industry has helped raise the living standards of many women in Bangladesh.

Caught With Their Shorts Down

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Early April’s 7.5 percent decline in the Nasdaq 100 should have been good news for short sellers, but many of them missed out.

Selling Ethical Fashion to the Whole Foods Set

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Where do your clothes come from? Startup clothing retailers are answering this question and urging customers to pay more and buy less.

Selling Ethical Fashion to the Whole Foods Set

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Last year, more than 1,100 workers died in the collapse of a Bangladeshi clothing factory. A handful of startup online retailers are taking action by selling direct and offering ethically manufactured, higher-quality products.

Why U.S. Retailers are Still Vulnerable

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There is a lack of synchronization among retailers, credit card providers, and banks to upgrade their credit and debit card technology to reduce fraud.

Slow Cop, Fast Beat

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are high-frequeny traders doing more harm than good? The SEC's go-slow approach to reining them in is causing some to question the SEC chair's lack of urgency.

Samsung's War at Home

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Troubling allegations raise questions about Samsung's responsibility for its employees' illnesses and deaths.

Predators Are Good For Stocks

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Do activist hedge funds benefit at the expense of other shareholders? Not according to Carl Icahn and some recent studies.

Hot Job After Working For Obama: "Unlobbyist"

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Former government officials are skirting registration and disclosure rules for lobbyists.

Mergers Are Back in Fashion—for Now

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Merger and acquisition activity is on the rise, including cross-border deals.

What Investors See (And Don't See) in MLPs

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Master limited partnerships (MLPs) are fee machines for Wall Street banks, but they may be more risky than many investors think. Are they the next great investment debacle?

Yes, It Matters Who Controls Icann

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. abdication of control over Icann in 2015 may threaten Internet freedom in the longer term.

Good for Kids, Good for Publishers

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Publishers profit when they work with First Book to make deeply discounted books available to children from low-income homes.

Keeping the Mystery Out of China's Meat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Western companies police the safety of China's food supply.

Companies Keep Piling Up Cash Overseas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S.-based companies use legal tax loopholes to minimize their U.S. tax bills but must keep their cash invested overseas to do so.

Facebook's Rally Takes Wall Street by Surprise

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Facebook stock, up 28 percent this year, is trading above the targets of many analysts who rate it a buy.

The Epic Hack

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Target's information security systems worked well and identified malware before customer data was transferred. Nevertheless, Target failed to respond to warnings, violated its customers' trust, and let millions become victims of cyber crime.

Silicon Valley Hears Echos of 1999

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While bankers and venture capitalists are confident about today’s IPO market, the shadow of the 2000 dot.com crash has some investors starting to worry about another asset bubble.

In 401(k) Plans, a Little More Makes a Big Difference

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How do 401(k) plans vary from company to company, and how close do they come to providing what employees will need for retirement?

Is Google Too Big To Sue?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google faces a potential class action suit over Gmail privacy concerns.

Tax Preparers Push the Benefits of Obamacare

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How are tax-prep firms helping customers sign up for Obamacare?

Buying Loans to Own the Homes

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With home prices up, investors saw a path to own cheap properties in the $34.7 billion of bad mortgages sold last year.

Bad Sports

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The academic fraud scandal at the University of North Carolina reveals ways that the university has failed its athletes.

House Calls Without the Home Visits

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investors are putting money into telehealth services used to treat common ailments.

Your Wilting Retirement

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

According to hundreds of government filings analyzed by Bloomberg, 18 percent of companies have reduced the amount or delayed payment of 401(k) matching funds and dragged out vesting schedules. For many, that could mean the difference between financial security and scarcity in old age.

Your Wilting Retirement

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Changes in corporate 401(k) contribution policies may have long-term consequences for employees' retirements.

Your Wilting Retirement

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The investment industry has said for the past thirty years that 401(k)s are a big improvement over pensions, giving employees more investment choice, more control over retirement planning, and more portability amid the frequent job changes of the modern workforce. How's that working out?

Your Wilting Retirement

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The 2008 financial crisis in the United States triggered a wave of cuts in company matches to 401(k) contributions that are making it harder for employees to prepare for retirement.

Nasdaq Has a New Pitch for Startups

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is there still a need for exchanges where the stock of private companies can be traded? Nasdaq thinks so, and it wants some of that business.

The Arabica Project

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Climate change and other factors are endangering the Arabica coffee bean. Starbucks’ response is to buy a Costa Rican coffee farm and share research on coffee plants and sustainable farming methods.

Too Big to Fail vs. Too Small to Get a Pass

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. authorities are bringing money-laundering charges to try to shut down Bitcoin companies.

Putting Released Prisoners Back to Work

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Companies may be assuming some risk as they change policies to facilitate hiring individuals with criminal records.

A Deal Divides Denmark

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Denmark's sale of 18 percent of state-controlled Dong Energy to Goldman Sachs is raising a furor.

Barbarians at the Suit Racks

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After more than four months of offers, counteroffers, poison pills, and pac-man defenses, Jos. A. Bank has now announced that it is considering acquiring Eddie Bauer to make itself less acquirable by Men’s Wearhouse.

The West Bank Puts Israeli Exports at Risk

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

SodaStream and other companies operating in East Jerusalem and the West Bank are facing boycotts. Do these Israeli companies provide a path to peace or further poverty and the denial of rights?

We're So Sorry

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The responses of university officials seem almost as irresponsible as the failures underlying the academic scandals involving the University of North Carolina's athletic programs. To some extent, attitudes seem to be changing.

No Tax Breaks for Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should the mortgage-interest deduction for yachts be repealed, and how much in tax revenue will it save if it is?

Facebook's Next Decade

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Facebook turns ten years old, it is one of the most profitable companies in the world and will soon become one of only twenty-six companies to have reached a market capitalization of $150 billion. Can Mark Zuckerberg keep Facebook growing?

Data Factories Spring Up in Santa's Backyard

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cheap abundant electricity and cold air make Scandinavia an attractive location for huge new data centers. They are also helping companies build the greenest data centers in the world.

Japan Tries to Alter the Market's DNA

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Compared with their U.S. and European counterparts, Japanese CEOs are less focused on shareholder returns. The country's prime minister Shinzō Abe's new JPX-Nikkei Index 400 is an attempt to boost growth by spotlighting companies that focus more on financial performance.

Fifty Degrees, Clear, and Snowing

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As glaciers melt, ski resorts are using new snowmaking technologies to keep operating. But solving one of the problems created by global warming may contribute to the problem of global warming itself.

Amazon and EBay Inch Into India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Regulations prevent foriegn-backed firms from operating retail facilities in India, but Amazon and EBay have managed to gain a small foothold by providing the "marketplace" for local firms to sell using the American companies' websites and warehouses.

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Student borrowing has reached a point where officials are comparing it to the mortgage crisis.

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The share of 25-year-old Americans with student debt increased to 43 percent in 2012 from 25 percent in 2003, and outstanding student debt has topped $1 trillion. Is a student loan crisis looming?

West Viringia is Leaking Lawsuits, Too

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With at least 20 lawsuits already filed, there is plenty of blame to share for a West Virginia chemical leak that left 300,000 without tap water for days.

Indonesia Wants to Play in the Big Leagues

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By tightening restrictions on the export of ore, Indonesia is hoping to incentivize multinational mining companies to do more domestic smelting and value-added processing of ore.

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fed economists are increasingly concerned about the surge in student loans.

Bitcoin Rush

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why are investors so crazy for an alternative currency?

Bitcoin Rush

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is Bitcoin the future of currency that transcends governments?

Risking Life and Limb To Earn $160 a Month

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Cambodia, striking garment workers are risking their lives to seek a higher minimum wage and a "better life."

My Fridge is Smarter Than Yours

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Samsung has captured worldwide market share in appliances, with the goal of being No. 1.

Collusion In the Chat Rooms?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Currency traders at the big banks may have used online chat rooms to rig benchmark rates in the unregulated $5.3 trillion foreign exchange market.

The Baby Boomer In the Basement

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Baby boomers are not as likely as their parents to have the safety net of pensions and other benefits, and many will have a lower standard of living in retirement than their parents.

Superbugs: From Farm to Table?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The FDA's new rules regulating antibiotic use in farm animals look a lot like the voluntary program at McDonald's. Why are many corporate forces opposed to stronger regulation?

Where Borrowers Couldn't Get a Break

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Former employees say Urban Lending stymied homeowners who sought mortgage modifications to avoid foreclosure.

American Hustle

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

False accusations of fraud, even if made by individuals with checkered pasts, can damage corporate reputations.

Farewell to The Age of Free Trade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Slower economic growth, protectionism, nationalism, and state-owned industries may lead to a slowdown in trade growth.

GE’s Lost Decade

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why has GE’s stock dropped a third during Jeffrey Immelt’s tenure as CEO?

The Truth About This Pork Chop and How America Feeds Itself

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can corporate meat processors be trusted to oversee worker and food safety?

GE's Lost Decade

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Including dividends, investors have had a total return of zero under Jeff Immelt’s twelve-year reign at GE although the S&P 500 returned 110 percent. Could this be a problem?

Airbus May Need a Plaid Jacket

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Since the 1993 introduction of the Airbus A340, soaring oil prices have dried up demand for the large capacity plane with four Rolls-Royce engines. Airbus took a big risk by guaranteeing the plane's resale value, a move that is coming back to haunt the company now.

A Lucrative Promise for India's Men: Whiter Skin

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

About 25 percent of skin care sales in India are from creams that promise to lighten skin color.

Keeping a Close Eye on Amazon's Discounts

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Camelcamelcamel's data and graphs help steer price-conscious Amazon shoppers to discounts that can top 30 percent.

Record Highs Lure Investors Back to Stocks

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Dismal fixed-income returns and the potential for worse are leading people to overcome their fear and put more money into equities.

The Man Who Took On Merrill

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Merrill Lynch's companywide policies may not have been overtly discriminatory, but they became the basis for certifying black brokers as a class in a racial discrimination suit. The cash settlement that resulted set a new record, and it may lead to transformational change in Merrill's work environment in the future.

A Plague That's Carried on Mobile Devices

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kill as many people as you can with your infectious disease.

Companies Are Leaving Cash on the Table in IPOs

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In six recent IPOs, investors were willing to pay twice as much for the companies as the bankers handling the offerings thought they would. Why are bankers leaving all that money on the table?

Cisco’s Tough Sell for Conference Rooms

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cisco is struggling to sell its pricey telepresence systems next to upstarts’ $10 monthly software subscriptions. Will its lower priced systems and new subscription-based model compete effectively against its new rivals?

The Scariest Veggies of Them All

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are chemical and seed companies prioritizing public health as they develop new crop varieties?

Trying to Build the Next Amazon—in Nigeria

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Online retailing and delivery has to adapt to Nigerian's skepticism and roadway realities.

The Long Wait for Rising Rates

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The spread between what banks pay for funds and earn on loans has plunged since 2010.

Banks Face a Legal Downpour

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While the stock market rebounds and the economy pulls out of recession, banks face a potpourri of legal challenges related to past actions.

Fast Food is Getting Lighter, Slowly

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fast food companies are working together to find ways to make their food healthier.

Knitting a Supply Chain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

ZARA's fast-moving supply chain quickly allows it to get new designs to stores worldwide.

The Battle Over Netflix

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With more than 40 million subscribers, Netflix has passed rival HBO and is looking overseas for growth.

Stranded

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite Apple's code of conduct and supply-chain audits, workers in the company's supply chain fall victim to excessive recruitment fees and other mistreatment.

How Citibank Bought a City Cheap

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Even alternative banking activists are using Citi Bikes. Is Citibank's sponsorship of New York City's bike share program changing the company's image?

London Calling to Faraway Towns

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The lowering of corporate tax rates is attracting more companies to move their headquarters to London.

Hell to Pay

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Five years after the start of the financial crisis, banks are finally paying billions of dollars in fines. Is this enough punishment? Will it deter fraud in the future?

Electrolux's Holy Trinity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To move up market, Electrolux is changing how it develops new products.

Saving Elephants with Google Earth

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Drones are helping keep Kenyan elephants away from poachers. They can’t help with Kenya’s booming population.

A Keystone Pipeline That’s Ready to Roll

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The southern leg of the line will soon be sending oil to the gulf.

Wall Street's Guilt Momentum

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mary Jo White, the new SEC chairman, is demanding admissions of guilt in settlement agreements.

Titans Clash for Scraps of a Deal Gone Wrong

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The buyout firms that carried out the biggest LBO in history may receive less than 3 percent of their original stake in the impending bankruptcy of Energy Future.

Hiring in the Age of Big Data

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Online questionnaires and games allow hiring managers to compare applicants with their star employees.

A Consumer Hero Returns to Wall Street

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Raj Date’s startup hopes to profit from non-conforming mortgages and other types of consumer loans. But Does Date’s former role at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau make his involvement in this market sector improper?

Target-Date Funds' Risky Balancing Act

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investors in target-date funds may be in for a shock when interest rates rise, but avoiding anxiety was the whole reason for picking a target-date fund in the first place.

SIM-Card Hackers Have A Few Questions for You

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A new way to scam people out of their mobile phone access could cost carriers billions this year.

Rural Banks Know Something Big Banks Don't

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Social capital and "soft" information can give small banks a big competitive advantage.

Setting Prices by Word of Mouth

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In a Bloomberg survey, market participants say that commodities benchmark prices may be wrong 27 percent of the time.

Runs Out Fast

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The newest wells are not as productive as those drilled in the first year of the boom.

The Big Bucks in Keeping Kids Focused

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Europe has been skeptical of ADHD diagnoses and the use of medications to address children's behavioral issues. But pharmaceutical companies have much to gain by pushing the diagnosis and treatment.

The Big Bucks in Keeping Kids Focused

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although two thirds of all ADHD drugs are sold in the United States, drug makers are trying to get the attention of doctors and regulators in Europe.

The Army Goes Green, but Not to Save the Earth

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. Army's "green" campaign may do more than protect the environment; it may save soldiers' lives.

Your Facebook Data Are Here

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By freely sharing innovations implemented in its Swedish data center, Facebook is conserving resources and helping to revolutionize the data center industry.

Yawning Through the Apocalypse

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Do investors have "calamity fatigue?" Wall Street’s fear index and other measures of anxiety show traders are giving the risk of a U.S. default a big yawn.

The Trouble With Fed Transparency

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Linking federal policy to specific jobless numbers confuses investors.

Don't Even Think About Returning This Dress

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

About 65 percent of retailers in a recent survey reported they were victims of “wardrobing” (the practice of wearing and subsequently returning clothing items) in 2012. Many retailers are taking a stronger stand against the industry’s $8.8 billion-a-year return-fraud problem.

Helping the Well-Off Qualify for a Mortgage

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As home prices rise, FirstREX will give home buyers as much as half the down payment in exchange for a piece of their equity and a share of any future appreciation.

Don't Even Think About Returning This Dress

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Retailers are risking customer loyalty to fight back against return fraud.

An Ugly Dilemma for Beauty Companies

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese regulations mandating animal testing for cosmetic products are forcing cosmetic companies to make difficult choices between economic and social responsibility interests.

Germany is Exporting Its Grandmas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With nursing home costs much lower to the east, many Germans are spending their final years outside their homeland.

Flipping Burgers In the Golden Years

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The median balance in retirement accounts of Americans aged 55 to 64 says it will be next to impossible for many boomers to finance their current standard of living through retirement.

An Ugly Dilemma for Beauty Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In China, regulations require certain products to undergo testing on animals before being approved for human use, while in the EU some of these same products would be banned if animal testing was used.

A Factory Owner Flees. So Does His Factory

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Between 2001 and 2011, about 27,000 companies left Italy, where high costs and regulatory rigidity have decreased competitiveness.

A Star-Powered Factory Opens in Haiti

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

IRII is using celebrity backing to bring change to Haiti's apparel industry and the lives of its workers.

China Turns the Screws on Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Chinese government is going after more foreign multinationals for violations of Chinese laws.

Hank Paulson On Facing The Abyss

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Get the ultimate insider's account, in Henry Paulson's own words, of the events and actions that triggered the 2008 crisis and how he helped stave off a total collapse of the financial system.

The NFL Concussion Deal's Surprise Winner

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The proposed settlement of the concussion class action suit against the NFL involves compromise on both sides and may have broad social implications.

In China, the Hunt is On for Energy Savings

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For Chinese factory managers, reducing energy costs is an economic imperative, but it may also create environmental and health benefits.

A Lie Detector Cleans Up a Kazakhstan Bank

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kazakhstan's Eurasian Bank addresses corruption by asking employees to take polygraph tests.

A Treasury Shortage Squeezes the Heart of the Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Impending new rules aimed at curbing shadow banking are causing a shortage of Treasury bonds.

Splits End

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why are fewer corporations making use of stock splits?

Splits End

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Only 10 companies in the S&P 500 have carried out stock splits this year, compared with an annual average of 48 since 1980.

Stretching The Medium

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With Medium, short-form online writing pioneer and Twitter co-creator Ev Williams is trying to rebuild waning Web attention spans.

Where Lawyers Never Go Hungry

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is boasting about a product's health benefits worth it?

Where Lawyers Never Go Hungry

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Northern California’s federal courts, dozens of pending cases against food companies are seeking class-action status. Are these suits helping consumers or just the lawyers?

Mexico's President Courts Big Oil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In order to extract hard-to-get oil reserves, Mexico needs the expertise of foreign oil companies.

Detroit's Failure Doesn't Faze the Muni Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The municipal bond market is defying predictions that Detroit's financial collapse would put it in a deep freeze. It might have even made it safer.

What If Fast-Food Jobs Really Paid $15 an Hour?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are the wages paid to fast-food restaurant workers an ethical issue?

In the U.S., Borrowing Is a Good Idea Again

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Households have drastically cut costs and can handle debt.

Your Not-So-Secret Medical History

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You had surgery last year and now everyone knows about it.

The Viral Media Site That Optimizes Optimism

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With a goal of promoting meaningful stories, Upworthy reconsiders the nature of viral content.

More Americans Are Gambling On ARMs

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Applications for adjustable rate mortgages, which were a key ingredient in the housing bust, were at a new five-year high at the end of June. Should we be worried?

Do Banks and Commodities Mix?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should deposit-taking banks be allowed to invest billions in physical commodities? The Fed has said yes in the past, but mounting pressure from Congress might change that.

The Death Sentence That Isn't Fatal

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How will criminal charges affect SAC Capital Advisors?

Asia's Bitter Harvest

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The market for palm oil is expanding, but human rights abuses are rampant in this industry.

Lenders Target Out-of-the-Box Home Buyers

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can loans to nonqualified borrowers be the next big thing for mortgage lenders? Raj Date thinks the answer is yes, and he wants to take advantage of this growing but risky market.

Asia's Bitter Harvest

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chances are pretty good that you'll consume some palm oil today and that you wouldn't want to work under the conditions in which it was produced.

Making the Stadium More Like Your Couch

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

“When you walk into the stadium, I’ll know everything about you.”

Hedge Funds Are for Suckers

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Reality check: No matter how many $100 million Picasso paintings they purchase, hedge fund moguls are not magicians. The sooner investors realize that, the better off they will be.

This Is What Success Looks Like

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 on the San Francisco Airport runway may look bad, but the low number of casualties is a testament to improvements in airplane safety, a culture of learning from accidents, and the effectiveness of shared responsibility for safety.

Beating the Market With Buy and Hold

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can a buy-and-hold strategy with high-dividend stocks beat the market? SunAmerica has a fund that appears to be doing just that.

Southern Discomfort

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Paula Deen's business depended on her life story, personal image, and reputation. Could the rapid collapse of her business empire have been avoided?

Getting Rich Remaking a Subprime Lender

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After a once-in-a-lifetime deal with the FDIC, John Kanas has resurrected BankUnited as a healthy, growing commercial lender.

Spillapalooza: How BP Got Screwed in the Gulf

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

BP is paying billions of dollars for economic damages related to its 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, but many of these claims may be inflated and/or fictitious.

H&M's New Love For Old Clothes

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

H&M is offering customers discounts to encourage recycling of old clothes.

Banks Brace for Higher Rates

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Are rising interest rates going to be good for bank profits? Bankers are telling investors yes.

This Prism Isn't Reflecting Much Light

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the wake of Edward Snowden's leaked information about NSA programs, U.S. technology companies are struggling to protect their reputations with users.

A Hunt for J.C. Penney's Missing Cashiers

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

At J.C. Penney, allowing staff to wear street clothes makes shoppers think there are few salesclerks in its store.

This Prism Isn't Reflecting Much Light

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How much privacy do we actually have? We still don't know.

Using Social Media to Stop Fraud

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Online payment companies and credit bureaus are trying to use information social media users voluntarily share to verify identities, detect true financial positions, and help reduce online fraud.

Battling for South Africa's Hidden Cash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In South Africa, banks and mobile phone service providers compete to offer banking and mobile payments.

How the Robots Lost

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why is it getting harder to make money in high-frequency trading? Those robots are just too good.

Retirement Savings Done Right

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Australia, at least 3 percent of every worker’s paycheck goes into a compulsory retirement savings program. Should Americans be required to save more for retirement?

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With natural gas prices three times higher in Japan than stateside, pressure to export more gas from the U.S. is mounting.

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

Facebook Struggles to Find Its Footing

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can investors be convinced that Facebook can continue to generate earnings as its mobile ad market share shrinks and users shift from personal computers to smartphones and tablets?

King Cat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Caterpillar is reporting record profits. Its CEO has been rewarded by steep increases in compensation. Should the company's employees benefit, too?

Crowdsourcing an End to Sweatshops

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Systems based on anonymous employee phone calls may be able to help Western companies monitor and improve working conditions in factories across the globe.

The Next Crisis for China Lurks in the Shadows

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some $5.86 trillion in unsupervised lending hangs over the Chinese economy.

The Paradox of Bangladesh

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How should multinational companies respond to deplorable working conditions in Bangladeshi factories?

The Perils of Price-Matching

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Implementation vagaries may be causing a consumer backlash to Wal-Mart’s national price-matching promotions.

Bond Investors Hope to Avoid a Repeat of '94

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will clear communications from Bernanke help avoid market disruptions when the Fed finally allows interest rates to rise?

The Data King of the Rental Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

RentRange can estimate the rent a property is likely to generate almost anywhere in the country.

Some CEOs Are More Equal Than Others

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The SEC has yet to develop regulations for implementing the CEO-to-worker pay ratio disclosure mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act.

China's Latest Illegal Import: Baby Formula

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Concerns about local baby formula in China drive demand for illegally imported baby formula.

Richard Cordray Wants to Get to Know You

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is it "creepy" for the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau to collect consumer finance data?

Turning Shoppers Into Heat Maps

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To catch up with e-tail, retail managers use tools to track shoppers and buying behavior in the store.

Israel's Big Bank Backlash

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Average citizens expressed outrage on Facebook and pressured Israel's second largest bank into withdrawing a sweetheart deal.

What’s Good for Toyota Isn’t Always Good for Japan

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Yen depreciation helps big exporters but won’t do much for the little guy.

Here Comes the Libor Scandal's Sequel

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The LIBOR rate-rigging scandal is prompting investigation of other economically important benchmark indices that may be subject to manipulation.

Here Comes the Libor Scandal's Sequel

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After fining banks billions of dollars for distorting Libor, regulators are now investigating possible manipulation of an obscure rate that influences prices in the $379 trillion interest rate swaps market.

The Escape Artist

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How did Rupert Murdoch and his company's stock price survive a potentially career-limiting phone-hacking scandal?

The Promise and Peril Of China’s Shale Gas

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shale-gas reserves in China far surpass America’s. Getting it out is the problem.

Alabama Opens Its Wallet to Woo Airbus

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To effectively compete for commercial and defense aircraft orders, Airbus decides it needs to have a factory in the United States.

Thailand's Farmer-Friendly Policy Blows Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In an effort to win support from farmers, the Thai government raised the price of rice and effectively killed exports.

Stocking the Shelves With a Green Solution

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lack of information creates opportunity for Green Depot’s environmentally friendly building products.

These Orphans May Get Smaller Allowances

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The economic incentives for developing orphan drugs may be changing as governments face budget pressures.

Can Penney Get Off The Down Escalator?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can bringing back former CEO Myron Ullman save J.C. Penney? Only if he can win back customers while conserving cash.

In Job Creation, Big Is Often Better

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Larger companies have hired faster than small businesses.

Who's Complaining About Your Bank

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can a public database of consumer complaints improve banks' customer service?

Would You Like Some PE in Your 401(k)?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Private equity funds want a slice of the $3.57 trillion that Americans have in 401(k) retirement plans. Target-date funds might be the way to do it.

The Euro Zone Loses Its Raison D’Etre

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign ownership of debt in euro-area countries is dropping.

What Good Are Low Prices If the Shelves Are Empty

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is it a good operations management practice to cut costs by reducing the number of employees, which may result in longer checkout lines, less help throughout the store, and disorganization?

The Merger Boom That Fizzled

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The value of global takeover and merger announcements in March was the lowest since July 2009. Why do some think a sharp rebound is coming soon?

The Fed May Be Miscounting the Money Supply

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By one metric, the money supply shrank in 2010 instead of expanding.

Lululemon, Exposed

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will see-through yoga pants damage Lululemon's relationship with its customers?

China's Journey from Imitator to Innovator

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

You make the call. Are China's Internet companies imitators or innovators?

The Einhorn Effect

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When David Einhorn talks, the markets listen — except when he talks about Apple.

Don't Return to Sender. Prosecute Instead.

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To the IRS' delight, a Swiss financial advisor inadvertently incriminated U.S. tax evaders.

The SEC's Road Map for Pursuing JPMorgan

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A Senate investigation provides evidence that the SEC and other regulators can use to prosecute JPMorgan and its executives.

Signing a Pledge to Snuff Out Corruption

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To help local government around Cleveland clean up its business dealings, area companies are signing anti-corruption pledges.

Silicon Valley's Green Edifice Complex

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Planted roofs, hidden parking garages and other environmentally conscious features are central to new headquarters designs for Apple, Google, and Facebook.

The Exchange Blew Up

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A year after a programming error almost killed it, BATS is now the third-largest electronic stock exchange in the U.S. handling about 12 percent of the stock traded on public markets in the U.S.

An Online Food Fight, Big Apple Style

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Online grocers FreshDirect and Peapod are battling it out in New York City.

Payroll Tax Hike? What Payroll Tax Hike?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Paychecks are slimmer. Time to spend more and save less.

Europe’s Carmakers Are Fighting to Shrink

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Europe's carmakers want to close five factories and cut 30,000 jobs. With a long history of worker protection and labor laws that support workers, those tasks won't be easy or quick. Even if they pull it off, it may not be enough to restore profitability. Some experts think it will take closing ten factories.

Hong Kong's Bosses Want Some Privacy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should the identities of Hong Kong companies' directors remain public?

Canada's Oil Industry Begs to be Taxed

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why are Canadian oil companies encouraging the government to impose pollution taxes on oil extracted from the tar sands?

Europe's Carmakers Are Fighting to Shrink

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While automakers in Europe want to close at least five factories in order to cut costs and reduce capacity, regulations and union resistance make it difficult.

Amazon's Cheaper Cloud Services—Up to a Point

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pssst...How does 90% off sound for cloud computing operations that allows clients to rent processors for as little as 10 percent of the company’s standard cloud services fees? Could this provide the competitive edge from an operations perspective?

The Other Side of Wall Street

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

John Thomas Financial projects a polished Wall Street image, but regulators are hearing reports of a sweatshop-like work environment, aggressive culture, and high-pressure sales tactics.

At Japan's Carmakers, Men Lead, Women Follow

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Female managers are a rarity in Japanese car companies, but successes at Nissan might change things.

Can Banks Be Too Safe?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will forcing banks to have much thicker capital cushions make them safer without producing higher interest rates, less lending, or lower economic growth? A popular new book says it's a real free lunch.

Swiss Voters Get Their Say on Pay

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Voters in Switzerland will vote in March on a law that would place limits on the type, timing, and allocation of executive pay packages.

Will Carnival Party On?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After a series of mishaps and related public relations disasters, will Carnival's reputation and stock price be able to rebound after the Triumph debacle?

Private Equity Shakeout

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The combination of underperformance and the need to raise money has set the stage for carnage in the private equity industry.

Things Fall Apart. IBM is Here to Help

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Providing free services with social benefits is part of IBM's strategy in Africa.

A Portrait of a Chinese Hacker

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Corporations like Dell employ malware experts to protect corporate economic interests, but society also benefits.

Can You Spot the Horse Meat?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

What potential risks are suggested by Ireland's discovery of horse meat in hamburger?

Oh, Craps. U.S. Homeowners Are Repeating Their Mistakes

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ignoring the lessons of the recession, Americans still have too much of their net worth tied up in their homes.

At Walmart, the Doctor Is Out

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After announcing plans in 2007 for 2,000 in-store medical clinics by mid-2012, Walmart is now closing clinic locations faster than it is opening them.

The Government Goes Medieval on S&P

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Could the Obama administration's $5 billion lawsuit against S&P be a death sentence for its parent company, McGraw-Hill?

Hacked? Who Ya Gonna Call?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Could your business be the target of a hacker attack?

Snapchat and the Right to be Forgotten

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Snapchat allows users to share photos while keeping better control of their own cyber personas.

The World’s First Indoor Hailstorm

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Severe storms cost insurers a record $25.9 billion in 2011, so they are studying risks in greater detail.

Hacked? Who Ya Gonna Call?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Could your firm be the target of a high-end cyber-espionage operation?

The Sting of Long-Term Unemployment

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Economists haven’t figured out why so many Americans have been jobless for more than six months.

Battered in China, Japan Inc. Seeks Refuge

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japanese auto companies are finding Thailand more friendly than China.

Small Enough to Fail

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The case of the only bank to be criminally indicted for mortgage fraud raises the question of whether the ends can justify the means.

Quicken's Rapid Rise in the Mortgage Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Quicken’s $25 billion in home loans during the fourth quarter made it the No. 3 lender, but can it hold on as refinancings dry up?

This Is What Unregulated Swaps Look Like

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How have government efforts to regulate the swaps market backfired and led some traders to shift to futures exchanges to sidestep the regulations?

Reinventions: Double-Decker Bus

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

So what makes for a good bus product in London? Operators, weigh in.

The Incredible Indistinguishable Egg

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Venture capitalists are investing in companies that create sustainable versions of eggs, meat, and other foods.

The Surprising Upside To Currency Wars

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan wants to create inflation, which will weaken the yen. The whole world may benefit.

Wage Growth May Signal Inflation Ahead

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Across the U.S., hourly wage increases for a majority of U.S. workers are starting to accelerate after four years of steady decline. What could this mean for operations managers?

The Dangling Man

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investigators work to untangle a web of relationships and shared information underlying illegal insider trading at hedge funds.

The Dangling Man

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Steven Cohen, SAC Capital's billionaire founder, may soon be charged with insider trading. Is insider trading standard procedure in Wall Street hedge funds?

Inside Big Pharma's Fight Against the $75 Billion Counterfeit Drug Business

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Pharmaceutical companies that compete in the marketplace cooperate to fight counterfeit drugs.

Mark Hurd, Leo Apotheker, Meg Whitman in Hewlett-Packard's Vertigo

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After losing more than 70 percent of its market value in two years, can Meg Whitman's new five-year plan reverse Hewlett-Packard's free fall?

Fiscal Cliff Deal + Obamacare = Higher Taxes on the Rich

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How will the fiscal cliff deal and the Affordable Care Act affect individuals’ taxes this year?

Sticky Gold

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The disappearance of $18 million of Canadian maple syrup is one of the largest agricultural thefts ever. While $18 million is a substantial sum, the motivation for the theft may have been philosophical.

Management Secrets from the Meanest Company in America

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How can the worst company to work for in America be so successful?

The Hazards of Forecasting Apple

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With Apple's shares down 24 percent since September 19, the challenge of predicting where the stock goes next has produced wildly varying forecasts.

Only BFFs Need Apply

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Companies are increasingly hiring employees who fit in with existing company culture, even if their job skills are lower than those of other applicants.

Unilever: Taking on the World, One Stall at a Time

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By emphasizing market share and having brands across many price points, Unilever is expanding in emerging markets.

Japan’s Central Bank Is Under Siege

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Bank of Japan may lose its independence if it doesn’t crank up the money supply.

What Should I Do With My Money?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

What do people who make a living assessing the performance of others think you should do with your money in 2013?

Pushing Banks to Unwind Their Global Bets

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Will the globalization of financial markets be undone by new rules?

The Foreclosure Wave That Wasn't

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The pundits said that as many as 1.8 million properties would be taken back by banks in 2012, driving prices into the ground. Instead, the number of properties for sale has shrunk to the lowest level in a decade, while prices have appreciated at the fastest pace since 2005. How did this happen?

Mary Schapiro's Unfinished Business

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Outgoing SEC chairman Mary Schapiro restored confidence in the SEC, but she failed to go after top Wall Street executives or achieve money-market fund reform. Can her successor do better?

The $67 Trillion Mystery

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shadow banking helped cause the 2008 financial meltdown, but the $67 trillion industry is now bigger than ever. Can regulators find ways to control it without limiting its usefulness?

Corporate China's Black Hole of Debt

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While many economic indicators in China are improving, one figure is going the wrong direction: corporate debt.

Aging Boomers are Undermining the Fed

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Record-low interest rates should encourage spending on big-ticket items like houses and cars, but retirees are not behaving like the Fed would hope.

Medicare and Medicaid Must Be Cut. Period.

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In terms of dealing with huge entitlement programs, we have so far simply postponed our date with reality. Spending for Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid amounts to more than 40 percent of our U.S. budget.

Confucius Makes a Comeback in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As China tries to balance open markets with government control, some of its citizens look to inspiration from the writings of Confucius.

Indian Companies Seek A Passage to America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Americans customers ask their software subcontractors to hire more U.S.-based employees, Indian firms struggle to find enough qualified Americans.

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

AB InBev, while cutting costs and making investors happy, is disappointing some loyal customers.

Masayoshi Son's Big Foreign Adventure

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A slow growth and aging market in Japan leads SoftBank to look internationally for investment opportunities.

Made in USA Still Sells

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

For products and services linked to positive American attributes (e.g., technology, Hollywood, fast food, etc), American-sounding names help products sell in developing countries.

The Marlboro Man's Grisly Replacement

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Australia now requires cigarette packaging to include graphic anti-smoking images, with no logos and the brand name in a standard font on a drab, dark brown background.

Asia's Growing Thirst For Gut-Cleaning Drinks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Saying that a yogurt product helps create intestinal flora or has health benefits helps drive growth in Asia.

The New Al Jazeera: More ESPN, Less CNN

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Al Jazeera has spent about $450 million purchasing soccer broadcast rights as it moves away from its emphasis on news.

Norway Has Too Much of a Good Thing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Norway's oil industry thrives, other businesses suffer as a result of high wages and a strong currency.

Not Worth It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Expatriates in China begin to wonder whether it is time to leave.

Japan's Hottest New Export Market: Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan's automakers are now shipping cars made outside of Japan, back to Japan for sale.

A Rainmaker For the Small Fry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An ex-ambassador uses online retailing to help small companies enter the Chinese consumer market.

This is Not a Russian Oligarch

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As the Soviet Union was disintegrating, Alex Rovt made a fortune using connections, barter, countertrade, and complex deals to establish a significant position in the fertilizer business.

China's Plans for Its Own Car Brands Stall

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Joint ventures with foreign firms have helped spur sales by Chinese automakers, but domestic brands have not fared well.

Unilever Wants to be America's Big Dipper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Unilever hopes to disrupt the U.S. ice cream business with its Magnum bars.

Russia's Bad Boy Hunts for U.S. Tech Treasure

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Russia's state-owned Rusnano invests in foreign firms, with a goal of transferring technology back to Russia.

Sanofi's Shock Therapy Enrages the French

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

France's Sanofi is closing R&D facilities in France and shifting research to America amid worker protests.

The People's Republic of Discounting

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Slowing economic growth is causing retailers to drop prices in order to generate revenue growth.

Japan Wants Free Trade. Its Farmers Don't

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While rural farmers contribute a minuscule amount to Japan's GDP, their political power to block free trade is significant.

China is Really Big. Its Brands, Not so Much.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's biggest brands look to Western markets for higher profits.

Getting Chinese Kids to School in One Piece

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. companies hope to make inroads into the school bus market in China, where it is predicted that 50,000 new school buses will be purchased a year through 2015.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Huawei has moved up from number seven worldwide in the smartphone market to perhaps number three.

In the Condom War, Sex Is Serious Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Durex rules most of the world in the condom business and is now looking to penetrate Trojan's dominant position in the U.S. market.

Big Green Profit Machine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Deere used to have trouble selling tractors overseas. Then it introduced a line of highly customizable machines that are feeding the world.

P&G Woos the Hearts, Minds, and Schools of Vietnam

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

P&G is looking to developing countries like Vietnam to spur growth in sales and profits.

DoCoMo Savors An Older Vintage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With 23 percent of Japan's population over the age of 65, phone makers are developing handsets and software that are senior friendly.

Made in China? Not Worth the Trouble

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Many smaller U.S.-based companies are finding that it may be less costly to produce in the U.S. versus China.

Snapp, If You Don't Want a Beer

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

London-based Diageo is betting that ready-to-drink cocktails, priced similarly to beer, will find a niche among African women.

China Goes Shopping For German Factories

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the economic downturn causing financial difficulties for German firms, some Chinese firms have found this to be a great time for making acquisitions.

Europe's Latest Hardliners: German Automakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While French and Italian automakers are feeling the pain of Europe's economic slowdown (and want financial assistance), German automakers that have long emphasized export markets in North America and Asia don't believe they should be asked to help in a bailout.

Foreign Banks Hit a Wall in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After spending $60 billion to build and buy franchises in China, global banks have earned about $10 billion there over the past decade.

India Finds New Ways to Tax Foreign Investors

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With India's governmental deficits running at 8 percent of GDP, foreign investors are finding that they may be targeted for new sources of revenue.

China Mobile Profits From the Google Void

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's decision to exit mainland China in 2010 has given China Mobile the opportunity to dominate the market for Android-based apps.

Mapping the Way to a Global Free-Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The more nations involved in trade-liberalizing negotiations, the harder it is to get things accomplished.

Supercar Makers Seek a Different Shade of Green

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

If you'rr interested in buying a hybrid, why not go for a $850,000 Ferrari with a 900 horsepower engine? (Sorry, Ford or GM don't sell a similar car.)

China Eyes Japan as the Land of Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese companies are looking to build their reputation, and their quality, by capturing market share in Japan.

Over A Barrel

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chevron and its managers in Brazil face criminal charges over an oil spill.

New Balance Wants Its Tariffs. Nike Doesn't

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

New Balance says it may be forced to give up manufacturing in the U.S. if a proposed trade deal ends most tariffs on footwear.

A Vital Pakistan Industry Is Dangerously Fragile

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Due to power and gas shortages, textile shipments from Faisalabad, Pakistan are down 50 percent.

Wal-Mart: A Pricey Corruption Inquiry Ahead

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Did Wal-Mart's managers in Mexico pay bribes in order to facilitate a rapid expansion?

Finland Imagines Life Without Nokia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nokia has dominated Finland's economy for years. Now other companies and industries are gaining in importance as the mobile-phone giant cuts back.

Foreign Beermakers Raise a Glass to China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign brewers operating in China are working to lure drinkers to pricier brands.

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

Where the Panda Gets the Window Seat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Last year Lufthansa's facility in Frankfurt handled more critters than it did humans in a highly lucrative niche of the air cargo business.

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China shifts its export focus from shoes and t-shirts to heavy industry.

Daimler's Billion-Dollar Bet on Hungary

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite overcapacity in the European auto industry, Daimler has invested $1 billion in a Hungarian plant with wages a fifth of those in Germany.

KFC's Big Game of Chicken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

KFC is growing quickly in emerging markets, but in the United States, franchisees are not happy with the attention they receive.

Look Who's Bringing Up the Rear

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

protectionism, tariffs, monetary policy, currency, Brazil, BRIC nations

Outsourcing: A Passage Out of India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As more high-skilled jobs are outsourced, corporations seek locations closer to home.

SABMiller Tries Selling African Home-Brew

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

SABMiller is expanding distribution of its cloudy Chibuku beer in Africa.

Miracle, Interrupted

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's economic miracle seems to be stalling, but just as the hype over success may have been overstated, the frequent references to demise may be also overstated.

The German Website Copy Machine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By cloning U.S. internet companies in other countries, three German brothers have made millions executing business ideas born elsewhere.

Made in China Makes India Uneasy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China exports to India twice as much as India exports to China, stirring concerns that Indian industries face trade barriers in China.

Qantas's Asia Problem: So Near, Yet So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Saddled with high costs, Qantas has a difficult time competing in the growing Asian market.

In China, A New Meaning for Blood Circulation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lab operator Kindstar provides laboratory services for China's growing medical market with U.S. financial backers, including the Mayo Clinic and Kleiner Perkins.

Grounds Zero

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why hasn't Starbucks tried to enter the market that inspired its development?

BMW's Mini: Little, But She is Fierce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

BMW's Mini, slightly larger than Daimler's Smart, outsells its older rival.

Turbulence for Europe's State-Owned Airlines

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The financial crisis and government debt in Europe is causing countries to question their continued subsidization of flag carriers.

Got Buffalo Milk? Glaxo Does, and India Loves It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A 138-year-old drink made from buffalo milk and barley outsells the colas in India.

The Contender

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Having thrived in America, Hyundai is using its high-quality, low-price strategy to compete with Volkswagen in Europe.

A Back Seat that Augurs China's Influence

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Automakers, after first developing specific design features for the Chinese market, are now exporting these vehicles from China to other markets.

'Made in Cambodia' - For Now

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's share of the developed world's textile imports is dropping as lower-wage competitors in Southeast Asia increase production.

In India, Inflation is a Rutted Road

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Poor infrastructure, including congested roads and insufficient electricity, drive up costs for manufacturers in India.

Wendy's Goes Beyond the Dollar Menu in Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To lure trendy diners in Japan, Wendy's has introduced a $16 burger topped with truffles and foie gras.

Philly Cream Cheese's Spreading Appeal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kraft Foods has revived its Philadelphia cream cheese brand, boosting international sales and adding flavors.

The Surprise Ending to the Rony Fuchs Affair

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After being denied claims of over $100 million against the Georgian government and being jailed, Rony Fuchs has been pardoned and received $37 million.

In China, Barbie's Reign May Be Short-Lived

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As China's toy market grows, manufacturers that used to emphasize exports now see opportunities at home.

On Top of the World - And Out $43 Billion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The economic slowdown in the West has left ArcelorMittal with high debt and over capacity.

An American Rebel Roils Ethical Commerce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Different groups debate over what are the requirements for a fair trade label.

The Italian Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An influx of Chinese immigrants is transforming Italy's economy and sparking cultural backlash.

Canada and the U.S. Try to Cuddle Up Again

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Reforms spelled out in a joint plan signed by Obama and Harper could give a boost to trade slowed by post-Sept. 11 border tightening.

Would You Buy $1 Billion in China-Made, So-Controversial-It-Hurts, Telecom Equipment From This Guy?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Huawei makes inexpensive switches and telecom equipment worldwide, but has had a hard time overcoming mistrust by the United States' government.

China is Ready for its Hollywood Close-up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hollywood studios are teaming up with Chinese film companies and creating roles for Chinese stars in order to help get films into Chinese theaters and work around rules that would otherwise limit studio revenue from Chinese audiences.

Qualcomm Rewires for India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To make inroads in India's mobile phone market, Qualcomm is assisting domestic handset makers and operators, and buying 4G spectrum.

A Pot of Trouble Brews In the Coffee World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ethiopia's attempts to make a robust commodity market coffee growers may weaken specialty growers and boutique roasters.

The History Behind Exxon's Arctic Coup

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Exxon's new agreement with Russia's Rosneft was preceded by years collaboration.

Zara Plays Catch-Up with Online Shoppers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Spain-based Inditex is counting on online sales rather than new store openings to power sales growth in the U.S.

A Spanish Starbucks For Sandwiches

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Spain's 100 Montaditos intends to open 4,000 stores in the USA at a pace far faster than Starbucks' early growth. Analysts are skeptical.

Overseas Cash Fuels a Shopping Spree

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An increase in foreign acquisitions by U.S.-based multinationals may partially fuel a desire to utilize tax-sheltered cash held overseas.

Can African Farmers Learn to Thrive?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Efforts to boost the productivity of, and payments to, small farmers in Africa could help alleviate poverty but hurt rich U.S. producers who rely on government farm subsidies.

Now Playing in Seoul: Angry Birds on iPhone

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A change in rules means that the Korean government will no longer require that all games be reviewed for content. This should lead to significant new sales for game makers and distributors such as Apple and Google.

The Really Long Arm of American Justice

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After losing a huge case in Ecuador, Chevron asks a United States judge to rule that it does not have to pay.

Apache Drills Deep Into Egypt's Shifting Sands

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apache's $8 billion investment in Egypt has boosted output (and profits), though its success may be impacted by the country's political transition.

Harnessing the Heat of Indonesia's Volcanoes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the Indonesian government providing generous subsidies, international companies are flocking to develop geothermal power from the country's volcanoes.

In Thailand, Ugly Politics is Testing Investors' Resolve

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While overall investment is down, longtime investors are shrugging off the political turmoil in Thailand because the country has traditionally treated foreign companies well.

Join the Euro? Whose Idea Was That?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Before the economic crisis, many Eastern European countries were excited about joining the monetary union in Europe. Now, some aren't so sure.

The Cheap China Gets A Lot More Volatile

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Inflation is causing more Vietnamese workers to strike, decreasing the attractiveness for foreign investors.

Tankers That Won't Kill You at the Gas Pump

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Hurt by the strong yen, Japanese boatbuilders employ a marketing pitch that stresses fuel efficiency.

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Focusing on internal growth rather than acquisitions, Proctor and Gamble wants to persuade more people in more places to use its brands.

Some Chinese Kids' First English Word: Mickey

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Disney's English language schools thrive in the English-hungry mainland.

Even Santa's Worried About Chinese Inflation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Higher commodity prices and rising Chinese wage rates are being passed on to retailers in the U.S.

The Swiss Can Barely Afford Their Currency

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The debt crisis in the euro zone has caused investors to move funds into Swiss francs, driving up the currency and hurting domestic manufacturers.

Despite Losses, Tesco's Still California Dreamin'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The British retailer's U.S. food chain, Fresh & Easy, is having trouble getting its formula right on the West Coast.

How 'bout Some Scotch With Your Green Tea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As China's market for luxury goods grows, Diageo is hoping Johnnie Walker whisky can take some of the market share currently held by cognac.

Fathers, Sons, and Russian Power Games

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

When President Medvedev barred senior government officials from serving on the boards of companies they regulate, they simply resigned and had their sons appointed.

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

VW is spending $1 billion on a new factory in Tennessee under the theory that you can't be the number one auto company in the world if you are not successful in the United States.

Brazil's New Middle Class Goes on a Spree

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As the Brazilian economy booms, shantytown residents buy on installment and pile on the debt. The government is worried about the prospect of defaults.

China's Power Outages Come Early and Often

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although the rates they can charge are regulated, the price of coal is not, putting Chinese power companies in a tough spot.

In France, Vive la Tupperware

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tupperware's growing army of culinary advisors have boosted sales in France by 17 percent.

Need a Towel Ring? Better Try China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It's getting harder to find U.S.-made products in many categories.

Clash of the Angry Swiss Watchmakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A proposed new law would increase the domestic content for a watch to be designated as Swiss made.

Pinkberry Looks Abroad to Keep its Cool

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The hip frozen yogurt chain, still tiny domestically, is expanding internationally.

The Arms Race Against the Pirates

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As piracy has become an identifiable risk in the Indian Ocean, shippers, insurers, defense forces and pirates are all availing themselves of new technology and tactics.

Disney Gets a Second Chance in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By focusing more on local culture, Disney has high hopes for its new theme park near Shanghai.

Why Caterpillar Digs a Colombian Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A trade pact could boost U.S. exports by $1.1 billion, with companies such as GE, Wal-Mart, Caterpillar, and Citigroup as big beneficiaries.

Will Argentina Humble the Grain Giants?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Is Argentina pursuing a new policy of nationalization, but without state ownership?

Separating the State and the Boardroom

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

By not allowing government officials to serve on corporate boards of companies they regulate, Russia is taking a step towards better governance.

The Thai Rice Bowl May Get a Little Skimpier

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Thailand is the world's top rice exporter, falling prices and rising competition may lead to a strategic decision to abandon that role.

Carlos Slim Sees Fat Profits on the Internet

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After conquering the mobile-phone market in Latin America, Am

The YouTube of China Goes Legit

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Youku faces tough competition and scrutiny from Beijing as it moves toward showing more original content on its site.

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

Crisis in Japan: The Impact on American Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nearly three dozen U.S. corporations derive at least 15 percent of their sales from the Japanese market.

Pandit Stakes Citi's Future on Emerging Markets

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Having recovered from the financial crisis, Citigroup now earns more than half its profits in emerging markets.

Benetton: A Must-Have Becomes a Has-Been

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the battle for inexpensive and trendy clothing, Italy's Benetton is losing global market share to Spain's Inditex and Sweden's H&M.

Censorship: The Trade Barrier That Dare Not Speak Its Name

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Why do trade officials view China's blocking of Internet sites differently from the blocking of goods? Should WTO rules apply to both?

Foreign Carmakers Try Brands Just for China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

GM, Honda, and others are reaching out to less affluent shoppers in China's interior with basic entry-level models.

Global Inflation Starts with Chinese Workers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rising wages in China will contribute to inflationary pressure on goods worldwide.

Getting Social Media Games to Play Overseas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To generate revenues from virtual goods, social media gaming companies look to localize their products abroad.

Stars and Stripes and Servers Forever

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Bucking the offshoring trend, SeaMicro manufactures its power-sipping servers locally, betting on superior speed and flexibility.

Trapped in Tbilisi

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After reaching a negotiated settlement to an earlier business deal gone bad, an Israeli businessman finds himself in a Georgian prison.

An Indian Tycoon Takes a Tumble

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With his company's shares in the dumps and the government on his tail, Anil Ambani will have to work to regain the faith of investors.

Hungry for a Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can a rainy spring in Saskatchewan contribute to the overthrow of a government in Tunisia?

A Solar Mother Lode for Chile's Mines

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With abundant sunshine and power-hungry mines, Chile is attracting solar power companies from around the world that want to develop power plants there.

It's Aussie Farmers vs. Chinese Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Water from underground aquifers in Australia is being fought over by exporters of agricultural products and iron ore processors.

A European Shadow on China's Solar Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As Chinese firms ramp up solar cell production, European governments are cutting back on subsidies.

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As U.S. electricity producers shift away from coal, coal producers are seeking export markets where there is less concern over carbon dioxide emissions.

An Iron Ore Rush Above the Arctic Circle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Booming demand for steel in developing countries is opening up Canada's Arctic region to iron ore mining.

In France, There's Pain in the Rising Cost of Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Due to a drought in Russia and floods in Canada and Australia, wheat prices have doubled in the past year. Now the French are seeing increases in the price of baguettes.

A First for China's Chip Giant: Profits

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A turnaround at SMIC could help China finally become a player in the global semiconductor industry.

Unleashing Exports Tied Up in Red Tape

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Reform of export-control procedures in the U.S. could allow firms to increase their exports of previously restricted products.

In India, 101 Employees Pose Big Problems

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's labor laws deter businesses from hiring more than 100 workers, except in some exempt industries. This limits Indian firms from competing in some industries with high economies of scale.

You Will Regret This Investment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some small-cap Chinese firms listed on U.S. exchanges file financial reports that have little relationship to reality.

Food: Freaky Weather, Scary Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While food may be consumed locally, it is grown worldwide. The price of groceries in the U.S. is directly impacted by the weather in Argentina, Russia, Australia and everywhere else in the world.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

Chinese Plants Grow on U.S. Turf

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Companies from China are increasingly setting up shop in the U.S. to avoid trade barriers and to learn new ways to compete.

Currency: How the Dollar Fared This Year

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

How has the value of the dollar changed relative to other currencies over the past year?

Don't Go to Rio For a Deal on an iPad

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brazil's industrial policy places a high tax on imports in order to encourage domestic production and foreign investment.

Here Come the Chinese Phone Manufacturers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mainland Chinese companies are gaining ground in terms of mobile phone sales, selling at home and abroad.

India's Ancient Spice Markets Heat Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While the spice trade may have spurred world exploration, growing affluence in India is driving up prices.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the call center business, the Philippines studied India's success and has now overtaken it in revenue.

China Takes Aim at Boeing and Airbus

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China is starting to build larger commercial aircraft to compete with Boeing and Airbus, with the help of Western suppliers.

India Revives an Old Plan for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India is trying to catch up to China by building special economic zones that promote manufacturing and exports.

Cotton Is King Again, Especially in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese apparel producers are being squeezed by cotton shortages, which will lead to higher clothing prices in U.S. stores.

Drop Russia, Add Indonesia: The Debate Is On

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Detractors say that Russia is not keeping up with others in the BRIC, while Indonesia deserves to be considered a fast-rising economic power.

How Baidu Won China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Robin Li beat Google and made his search engine No. 1 in China. Now he wants to go global, but it will take some work to get the world to trust Baidu.

Corporate India Finds Greener Pastures—in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Indian companies, faced with increasing competition and bureaucratic obstacles at home, are looking to Africa for growth.

Fiat Tries Another Breakfast in America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

After being out of the U.S. market for 27 years, Fiat is using its Chrysler connections to stage a comeback with a very small car.

A Former No-Name from Taiwan Builds a Global Brand

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

HTC, once unknown in the U.S., has become the top handset maker in the Android market, a segment that's growing faster than Apple's iPhone.

Coke's Last Round

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sales are flat in developed countries. For Coke to keep growing, Africa is it.

Google's 2.4% Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's complicated international structure shifts most of its revenue from Ireland to The Netherlands to Bermuda. Is it evil to avoid taxes?

Made in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Chinese tilapia is a bland-tasting fish that grows fast, sells cheap, and has environmentalists up in arms. U.S. fish farmers aren't happy either.

Those Amber Waves Are Fueling Exports

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Due to a weak dollar and poor growing conditions in Europe, U.S. farm exports are strong this year.

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Your next investment opportunity is in the last place you'd think to look.

One Publisher Applauds as Its Print Ads Wither

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While many publishers bemoan the loss of print ads, Norway's Schibsted has developed a more-profitable global business in online classifieds.

India's Bitter Choice: Water for Steel or Food?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There is competition in India for water, required both by local farmers and by foreign developers of steel mills.

Where iPads Are Free, and Cases Cost $1,000

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The iPad is still not approved for sale in Taiwan, but online auction sites are selling high-priced accessories that come with a free iPad.

Never Miss A Good Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shaking off disgrace and a $1.6 billion fine, the German conglomerate aims to build the world's infrastructure, especially in emerging markets.

Africa Looks Like a Dealmaker's Paradise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some $15 billion in takeovers have been announced in July, with the latest being Wal-Mart's agreement to buy South African retailer Massmart.

'Rural Outsourcers' Vs. Bangalore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Rural middle America costs less than the East and West Coast, and is easier to deal with than India or Russia

How BP Learned to Dance With the Russian Bear

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although the relationship between BP and Russia has been tense at times, both now seem to see the benefits of working together

The Squeeze on Global Rubber Supplies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Freakish weather hurts rubber production across Asia, giving a Japanese condom maker a headache

For India's Consumers, Pepsi Is the Real Thing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In India, the word Pepsi has come to mean anything foreign, fizzy, and bottled, giving Pepsi cola the leading market share.

The Fallen King of Finland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nokia's decline in the market may be linked to its isolated geographic base.

Chairman Gou

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Most Westerners are unfamiliar with Foxconn, but know the products it makes as a contractor for Apple, HP, Sony, Dell, and other electronics firms

For Europe Inc., Dreams of Sahara Sunshine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

European firms want to tap into North Africa's abundant sunshine to create electricity

Japan Has More Than Just a Yen Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The root of Japan's highly valued yen lies in policy choices by the government.

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's booming demand for iron ore is causing opportunities and problems in Australia.

Japan's Mizuno Swings for the Fences

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan's top baseball brand is aiming for the U.S. market

How GE Helps China Build Business Leaders

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Non-GE Chinese executives attend GE's U.S. training courses.

Australia's Mother Lode of Mining Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Brisk demand for minerals has led to a mining boom in Australia. It offers great pay, but you could get killed.

The World's Most Caffeinated Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Coffee consumption and economic growth appear to be linked.

Drought in China Hits the Energy Sector

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Southern China's significant dependence on hydroelectric power, coupled with drought, has led to energy shortages.

Iraq's Economy Wakes Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Private growth is picking up, consumer goods are available, and investment in oil fields is up. Yet security and limited financing make growth difficult for some businesses.

Looking East, Big Pharma Cuts Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Drugmakers are beginning to choose sales volume over high margins to tap the massive Asian market

Turkey's Moment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It came through the last few years without a bank failure, and is showing strong economic growth

How Korea Fretted Its Way to success

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Years of worrying about being squeezed by China and Japan helped Seoul stand up to its rivals. Now, it's obsessed with finding the Next Big Thing.

Saudi Banks Put the Squeeze on Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the wake of two big defaults, lenders have tightened credit, which may threaten the kingdom's growth.

A Tear in Japan's Safety Net

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Some Japanese retirees, out of respect for former employers and current employees, have agreed to cuts in guaranteed pension benefits. Will this change the corporate culture?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ford is making up for lost time, boosting investment, production, and marketing in fast-growing China and India

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

Closing for Business?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Western companies are finding themselves shut out as Beijing promotes homegrown rivals.

Greece's Weakness is its Strength

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Greek Prime Minister Papandreou has used his country's fragile state to his advantage in negotiations with the EU

Invasion of the Guatemalan Chicken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chicken chain Pollo Campero established a niche with immigrants in the U.S. Now it is hungry for more

In Defense of Goldman. Really

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Loopholes in EU rules, not Goldman Sachs, are to blame for Europe's debt troubles

The Ka-Ching in China Luring Medical Giants

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

GE, Siemens, and others are angling for a piece of the $125 billion Beijing plans to spend on health care

Your Handy Guide to Russia's Oligarchs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With the country's market soaring, Russian billionaires are seeing their fortunes revive

Deadly Business in Moscow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The lawlessness of the legal system can make business in Russia difficult.

Korean Tech Is Losing Its Cool

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A trendsetter in mobile phones is faltering in the era of software, smartphones, and apps.

Europe's Hedge Fund Fight

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The EU says new rules will boost stability, but funds fear for their profits.

Is China Fed Up with the Colonel's Chicken?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mainland same-store sales at KFC and Pizza Hut are down. Why that's a troubling sign for Western fast food.

A European Tour for U.S. Labor

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

American unions are taking the fight for U.S. workers to European employers' home turf.

Japan's Car Guys Cross the China Sea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese automakers are hiring more Japanese engineers to boost efficiency and improve design.

Don't Underestimate India's Consumers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Western multinationals are often attracted to China's size, but they're bypassing Asia's true shopping powerhouse.

Indonesia: Unfinished Highway to Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Farmers are stalling the government's efforts at much-needed infrastructure projects.

Google and China: A Win for Liberty - and Strategy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Google's threatened pullout from China may be motivated by principles, or maybe just profits

Sony and Samsung's Strategic Split

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Sony bets on outsourcing TVs, Samsung is building an edge by making its own.

The Return of the Outsourced Job

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

To boost employment, local governments are wooing Indian companies such as Tata, Wipro, and Infosys.

A French Wal-Mart's Global Blitz

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mega-retailer Auchan has a powerful patriarch, a secretive culture, and an insatiable urge to expand.

China's 'Made in China' Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The downside to Beijing's huge stimulus is a glut of factories and output that may spur trade friction.

Do the Chaebol Choke Off Innovation?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

South Korea's giant family-based conglomerates are thriving, but they may be crushing small companies.

Shelly Adelson's Misstep in Macao

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sands investments in family-oriented and convention-based casinos falter in Asia. What works in Vegas may not work as well outside Vegas.

Land Rush in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Agribusiness and global investors are scooping up farmland. Are corporate farmers the new colonialists?

Should Developing Nations Clamp Down on Hot Money?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Capital controls may be making a comeback as countries try to control inflationary bubbles.

Healing Chile's Malaise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite decades of economic growth, average citizens are dissatisfied; they want better schools and more opportunities.

Vodafone's Indian Dilemma

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It's signing up plenty of new customers, but a price war is killing margins.

A Slog in China for Foreign Insurers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Strong domestic players and restrictions on foreign companies make it tough for insurers.

Indian vs. Chinese Autos: No Contest

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's exports are pulling ahead, thanks to quality and engineering that China's carmakers don't match.

Mickey in Shanghai

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It's taken 15 years, but Disney has finally gotten the green light on a new theme park near Shanghai.

Spain: Seeking New Worlds to Conquer

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Flush with cash and facing hard times at home, Spanish companies are again looking abroad.

Hard Times Ease for a Cement King

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cemex, with operations in 50 countries, is being hard hit by a downturn in worldwide demand for cement.

Europe Inc. Takes Aim at Price-Fixers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Michelin, among others, is using U.S. tactics and lawyers to sue supply cartels that overcharge.

The China Hype

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite an impressive rebound, an innovation shortfall may hobble sustainable growth.

An Asian Nanny State Ups Its Fun Factor

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Singapore is loosening up a little, and trying to attract more tourists.

Korean Exporters' Won Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Korean products are still a bargain, although the currency has recently strengthened following a 40% drop against the dollar.

What's Holding India Back

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Business is battling farmers over land, putting $98 billion in investments

Turkey Turns Outward

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Applying for EU membership has sped up reforms, which has helped Turkey weather the current turmoil.

Europe's New McCafe Culture

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Low-cost expansion is helping McDonald's vie with Starbucks as the continent's No. 1 coffee chain.

The Peril and Promise of Investing in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

It's still risky, but for global corporations, the country is simply too big - and too rich - to ignore.

A Tiff over Tires

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tit-for-tat trade troubles brew between China and the U.S.

The Oil Crisis Slamming Mexico

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sharply dropping Pemex revenues are causing a budget deficit in Mexico.

Glock's Profit Machine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Glock, an Austrian handgun manufacturer, has found the U.S. to be a very attractive market.

Lower Your Taxes: Come to Switzerland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Multinationals, hedge funds, and private equity firms are finding lower tax rates in the Alps.

Indian IPOs Sizzle, but for How Long?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Big foreign investors are snapping up issues, but overpricing is spooking small investors.

Tata: Clawed by Jaguar and Land Rover

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Not only is it a tough market for high-priced cars, India-based Tata Motors is finding some new challenges in working with the British government and European regulations following its acquisition of Jaguar and Land Rover.

Starwood is Blanketing China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Sheraton brand is doing well in China, and is expected to grow as tourism increases

Brazil's Coming Rebound

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With sound banks, effective government policies and strong consumer spending, Brazil may finally be on the way to economic growth.

Is China Leading a Global Recovery?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Many firms are hoping that Chinese consumers can help boost demand for their products.

Will Iraq Be an Oil Power Again?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Iraq's deal with BP signals a revival that could eventually put it on a par with the Saudis.

Using the Slump to Get Bigger in Bangalore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's info tech leaders are seizing on the downturn to become global players, but they have a long way to go.

China's Shopping Spree

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese companies are looking at acquiring foreign firms as a way of investing their overseas earnings.

GM's Korean Quandary

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

GM's debt-swamped Daewoo division is slumping badly, but it's too important to GM to sell.

Coke vs. Pepsi: The Slugfest in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In a hard-fought contest, Coke is opening plants, boosting non-soda brands, and jazzing up marketing.

IKEA in Russia: Enough Is Enough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Red tape has prompted the Swedish retailer to put further investment in the country on hold.

Beijing Bolsters the Barriers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite appeals to the WTO, there's not much the U.S. can do about China's protectionist policies.

Iranian Business Fears the Worst

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Ahmadinejad's contested re-election may cause problems for businesses big and small.

Hunting for Growth: The Overseas Adventurers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While many companies are scaling back their global ambitions amid the recession, others are looking to gain a bigger foothold abroad.

The New Protectionism

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Stimulus packages and bailouts look a lot like industrial subsidies, something the U.S. and other governments have been fighting against for years.

China's Eroding Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Outsourcers are seeing the costs of manufacturing in China climb, making other countries more attractive.

One Ford for the Whole Wide World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can Ford design a car that will be a hit in Asia, Europe, and the Americas?

Chinese Carmakers Are Gaining at Home

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Incentives for improved efficiency and low prices give domestic Chinese producers an edge when competing in one of the most attractive automotive markets.

The Surprising Strength of Southeast Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite continuing concerns about corruption, red tape, and political instability, it's suffering far less than other parts of the world.

Kia Motors: Still Cheap, Now Chic

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kia Motors' designs are turning heads, and its prices are good for the budget. Can it get past uncertainty over quality?

The Skilled Hand Inside a Fiat Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The legendary connections of Roland Berger could help make the Fiat-Opel-Chrysler alliance happen.

Can China Clean up its Act?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's growing demand for energy is causing it to invest in clean technology.

Chavez Targets the Drillers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lower oil prices are putting pressure on the Venezuelan oil industry, which is trying to squeeze oil services contractors.

The Overseas Tax Squeeze

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Obama's plan to bring home more revenue from multinationals is more complex than meets the eye.

Good Times for Cheap Cell Phones

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As several established mobile-phone companies stumble, China's ZTE is moving up in market share.

What the Nano Means to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In a country where cars have largely been unaffordable, the $2,000 Tata Nano is making autos affordable to many.

Philip Morris Unbound

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Philip Morris is pushing hard to expand sales in countries with few restrictions on tobacco products, and foreign antismoking activists are learning from their American counterparts.

The Sudden Chill at an Indian Hotspot

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Gurgaon, a suburb of Delhi, is suffering from a wave of layoffs as Western companies retrench.

Santander's Grand U.S. Game Plan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With its Sovereign Bancorp purchase, Santander takes its strong acquisitions record to the American Market.

Business Is Standing Its Ground

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Despite the drug violence, major global companies are hanging tough in Mexico.

A Bid to Reconnect With America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nokia gets rave reviews around the world, and its global market share is increasing. Now it's out to boost its low U.S. market share.

India Inc. Frets as Elections Loom

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

An anti-business coalition could slow the kind of economic reforms that have spurred growth.

M&A: Behind the Heat on Global Deals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Heightened antitrust action, such as China's no on Coke-Huiyuan, may signal a new approach to protectionism.

Inspiration From Emerging Economies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Innovation used to trickle down from rich countries to developing markets. Now it is starting to flow the other way.

The Krisis in Russia's Industrial Heartland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tensions rise as once-booming Yaroslavl and other factory cities come to a screeching halt.

The Rise of the Maghreb

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

North Africa is fast becoming a key supplier of energy, and a location for lower-cost manufacturing than Eastern Europe.

An Oasis in the Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Saudi Arabia's conservative policies have helped it dodge the financial meltdown.

What's Dragging Europe Down

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although Europe largely avoided the subprime loan mess, it's struggling to prop up some subprime companies and subprime countries.

Japan is Running out of Options

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japan is impacted by the worldwide economic slowdown. Since its banks have largely avoided bad loans, its safe status is driving up currency and killing exports.

China's Exporters Look Homeward

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As global sales slump, mainland manufacturers start to woo Chinese consumers and threaten multinationals.

The Electric Car Battery War

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Lithium-ion car batteries are an exciting technology. Which countries and companies will benefit, however, is still up for grabs.

For Accounting Giants, Nowhere to Hide?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Courts are considering whether only national organizations are liable for mistakes or the entire international entity.

GM Hits a Wall in China, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese consumers, concerned about quality and GM's future, are finding GM less attractive than they have in the past.

Russia's Lawyers in the Crosshairs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Human rights advocates have long been targets. These days corporate attorneys are under attack, too.

Bribery Crackdown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The U.S. government is increasing its enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Trade: Hawks Will Square Off against Retailers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Consumers and retailers want low-cost foreign goods, while domestic manufacturers want protection from these same goods. Who will win in the new Obama Administration?

A Scandal Shakes India's Outsourcers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The Satyam chairman's admission of fraud could impact the reputation of all of India's outsourcing firms.

How the Strong Yen Has Weakened Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The currency's climb is hurting exporters, and there's no domestic demand to take up the slack.

A Hundred Factories Too Many

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Can carmakers scale down production and then ramp back up when demand starts to recover?

China: An Early Test for Obama

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. trade hawks are pressing Obama to get tough with Beijing over charges of steel dumping and export subsidies.

A World of Risk—and Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Emerging markets look scary, but they promise big rewards for bold investors.

Behind Caterpillar's Big Scoop in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Patience, persistence, and transfer of technology paved the way for Caterpillar to make a big acquisition in China.

The Foreigners at the Top of LG

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The once-stodgy Korean company has hired a team of Western managers to boost its image

How Risky is India?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the wake of the Mumbai siege, businesses must weigh the persistence of political violence against the strength and promise of the Indian miracle.

Russia's Economy Turns Swiftly Siberian

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Free-falling oil prices and exposure to Western financing are causing havoc in Russia.

South Africa Emerges From The Shadows

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Wealth and corporate savvy have turned a young nation into a regional powerhouse.

China's Consumers: Too Scared to Spend

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Instead of sustaining global growth, as the world hoped, China's new middle class is hunkering down.

What's Driving Up the Dollar

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Fear, foreign economic pressures, and fund redemptions are all pushing up the value of the dollar.

America's Lifeline—Exports—Is Fraying Fast

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Shrinking foreign demand and an appreciating dollar will cut the demand for exports.

Info Tech Is So Yesterday

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Indian design startups are booming as offshore and domestic customers seek an edge.

Cisco's Brave New World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Cisco is strategizing with governments around the world about their technological futures.

Islamic Finance May be on to Something

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Banks and mutual funds that comply with Islamic law have largely evaded the fallout form toxic debt.

Bangalore Backlash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The tech boom has brought highways, high-rises, malls, and nightclubs. Now many locals want their once-tranquil city back.

The New Silk Road

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Historic bonds between the Middle East and Asia are being revitalized in a torrent of trade and investment in energy, infrastructure, and manufacturing.

The IMF Is Back, Kinder and Gentler

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The IMF has had little to do for the past few years, but now it's back helping countries in need of emergency loans.

With a Soaring Yen, Japan Is Buying

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

With a weak local market and a strong currency, many Japanese firms are taking the opportunity to make overseas investments.

Emerging-Market Time Bombs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign-denominated loans are squeezing countries from Romania to South Korea as their currencies falter.

Mapping the iPod Economy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Research suggests that the iPod creates more jobs overseas than in the U.S., but that total wages are higher in the U.S.

'This Would Be Bigger Than NAFTA'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Quebec is easing commerce and labor barriers with France, which may lead to a broader Canada-EU deal.

A Power Shift in the World of Oil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Producers from Russia and other parts of the world are becoming major players in the energy industry.

The Business Boom Unfolding Down on the Russian Farm

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Investors are pouring billions into agribusiness and trying to reverse decades of Soviet mismanagement.

Nokia's Bid to Rule the Mobile Web

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

While Apple may get all the headlines in the U.S., Nokia has a variety of phones worldwide to help users find information on the internet.

Outsourcing Shops Feel the Street's Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As U.S. financial services firms cut back on information technology spending, it will impact India's software firms.

All This, and Perhaps a Plunging Dollar, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The dollar could suffer if foreign investors decide to reduce their investment in dollar-denominated investments.

Brands: Moving Overseas to Move Upmarket

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Consumer goods regarded as workaday in their home countries often gain luxury cachet when launched in a foreign land.

Russian Stocks in Free Fall

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign and local investors flee Russian equity markets as part of a vicious circle.

Philanthropy by Design

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

There are opportunities in poor countries to develop innovative products that solve local problems.

Global Office Space is in the Basement

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The ripple effects of the U.S. credit crunch are impacting developers and banks in Shanghai, London, Tokyo and virtually everywhere else.

Outsourcing the Drug Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

U.S. drug companies are rushing to partner with Chinese and Indian drug companies, tapping their brain power, low costs, and quick work.

After the Games, a Dimming Flame

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China's growth will cool as slowing global demand and rising costs at home impact exports and profits.

Stalking the Wild Copycats

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In Africa, no consumer product seems too small or too cheap to be targeted by Chinese counterfeiters.

BP's Dream Deal Hits a Rough Patch

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

BP's joint venture in Russia has been a high-risk, high-reward endeavor.

Free Trade: After the Impasse

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The collapse of the Doha Round of trade negotiations will likely lead to more bilateral and regional trade deals.

All Eyes on India's Nuclear Prize

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India plans to build 30 new nuclear reactors over the next 10 years, but American firms will have a difficult time winning many contracts.

Mom-and-Pop Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Improved software and services allow even small firms and entreprenurs to outsource tasks to firms and individuals worldwide.

Welding a New Metals Giant

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Russia is working to create one of the world's largest mining and metals firms by merging some local firms that could compete on a global scale with other multinational firms.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Russia's Yandex has a strong position relative to Google in the local market.

Who's Afraid of a Feverish Economy?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Foreign investment keeps coming as the Vietnamese government moves to restrain exuberance.

Can the U.S. Bring Jobs Back From China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Expensive oil and a falling dollar are reducing some of the advantages of shifting production out of the U.S. to China, but don't expect a sudden surge in U.S. manufacturing jobs.

Monsanto on the Menu

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Monsanto is betting that the food crisis will create new markets for genetically modified products.

Stalled in the USA: Europe's Small Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The strong euro and high cost of labor are making it difficult for VW, Volvo, and other European carmakers to show a profit in the U.S.

Dow Chemical: Liable for Bhopal?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although Dow Chemical played no part in the 1984 disaster at Bhopal, India, many in India want to make it take some responsibility.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility.

Brazil's Answer to Global Hunger

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Soaring food prices are giving farmers in Brazil a political edge in the battle between agribusiness and environmentalism.

India Plays Catch-Up in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Indian companies are finding that Africa provides great growth and investment opportunities.

In India, Death to Global Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Although the Indian economy is doing well and attracting significant foreign investment, most foreign investors, as well as many locals, may not be aware of the threat posed by the Naxalites.

Acting Globally but Selling Locally

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Chinese athletic wear maker Li Ning is raising its international profile to win over shoppers at home.

Solutions from a Hunger Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The current global food shortage could have an upside: lower trade barriers and increased farm productivity.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) makes most of its money in the U.S., while IBM does the bulk of its business abroad.

Nokia Starts Listening

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Tired of losing ground in the U.S., the handset maker is ready to customize phones for carriers.

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple's iPhone, a blockbuster in the U.S., has not been as successful in Europe.

Flying in For a Tune-Up Overseas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In an effort to cut costs, airlines are increasingly turning to overseas foreign facilities for aircraft maintenance.

A Town Torn Apart by Nestle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Nestle's plan to build a bottled water plant in a Northern California town has undergone significant pressure from opponents of the plant.

China's Factory Blues

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The days of ultra-cheap labor and minimal regulation are gone. As exporters' costs increase, they must shift production to lower-cost locations and/or raise prices.

Ireland: The End of the Miracle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The powerful euro has crushed the country's decade-long economic expansion as well as its competitiveness.

Dollar Daze in Europe

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The falling value of the dollar is decreasing the competitiveness of many European firms, causing them to shift production to the U.S. or other low-cost facilities.

Globalization Bites Boeing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Boeing is upset over the recent awarding of a tanker contract to Northrup Grumman and EADS.

One World, one car, one Name

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Should companies use the same brand name for their products worldwide, or tailor the brand name to local conditions and languages?

Carlos Ghosn's Russian Gambit

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Renault is betting that an old Russian Lada factory can become a large producer of low-cost automobiles.

My Way or the Highway at Hyundai

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Kia and Hyundai are trying to move upscale in the U.S. market, but culture clashes and management turmoil are making it difficult for these Korean brands to make their targets.

More Fodder for the Yank-Haters

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

American-style capitalism is being blamed for some of the subprime financial difficulties facing many European firms.

Multinationals: Are They Good for America?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Multinationals are productive, innovative, and loaded with cash, but will they bail out the U.S. economy?

Brazil's Iron Giant Reaches for the Top

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In the world's mining and steel making industries, every firm seems to be predator, prey or both.

Israel: Attack of the Super-Shekel

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The rising value of the shekel is causing some Israeli firms to shift research and production out the country.

Tata: Master of the Gentle Approach

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's Tata has made $18 billion worth of overseas acquisitions since 2000, but most acquired firms continue to operate autonomously with little interference from headquarters.

What's Roiling India's Stock Market? Bonds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

India's debt and equity markets are hobbled by regulations that are intended to serve and protect small investors.

Just Don't Call It 'Chindia'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

China and India are both currently booming. Foreign executives have found, however, that the formula for success in one probably will not apply to the other.

The Wind at Germany's Back

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Germany has taken a leading role in renewable energy as a result of government incentives and corporate investments in technology.

Exporting America's Travails

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

In recent decades, when the U.S. sneezed, the rest of the world caught a cold. Has the influence of the U.S. economy on the rest of the world decreased in recent years?

Managing the Global Workforce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Multinational companies face many human resource management challenges as they seek to match talent from all over the world with client needs.

Who's Afraid of Mideast Money?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Sovereign funds from the Middle East now control about $1.7 trillion and have made investments in companies, industries, and exchanges across the world. Like them or not, they are changing the global investment landscape.

An Industry That's Fraying Fast

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The rising value of the Indian rupee is causing financial difficulties for some Indian textile firms, and causing others to find cheaper locations outside India for production. And although India may be a growing information systems powerhouse with 2 million tech employees around Bangalore, the textile and apparel industry employs 88 million.

The Stealth Oil Giant

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Schlumberger is a quiet, multinational giant that operates in oil fields worldwide. It provides services in every major field in every major country, acting locally while sharing knowledge and expertise worldwide.

A King of the Wild Frontier

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

James A. Harmon's Caravel finds investment opportunities in the world's unlikeliest places, from Zimbabwe to Pakistan to Lebanon.

Psst! Wanna Buy an iPhone?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Apple currently does not sell iPhones in China; nevertheless, iPhones are available to those willing to pay the price.

Austrians are Retaking the Balkans

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Austrian firms are making significant investments in high-risk Balkan countries, using their local knowledge and historical ties to the area.

Now It's Really International Paper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

International Paper historically has not been very international. That is changing as it invests in pulp and paper production in Russia, Brazil, China, and other locations around the globe.

Can Greed Save Africa?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

African countries have received foreign aid for decades, but Africa is still the poorest continent in terms of GDP per capita. New private investment is starting to trickle in. Can entrepreneurs and private investors succeed in spurring economic development where government programs have largely failed?

Russian Labor Raises Its Voice

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

A strike at Ford and other recent labor actions suggest that Russian workers may be more willing to go on strike than in the past. Multinational companies are also a primary target.

Paving a 'Road to Russia's Future'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Russia is looking to raise $1 trillion over the next decade, 80% from private sources, to fund infrastructure development. This is creating some opportunities for multinational construction firms and investors.

The Coming Commodity Clash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

As industrial growth and infrastructure development continue to be strong in India and China, these countries' demand for basic commodities grows.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Capital is rushing into China, Chinese companies are going public, and many individuals and companies are trying to profit by investing in listed firms.

Siemens Braces for a Slap from Uncle Sam

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Siemens, a large German-based multinational firm, has faced significant fines in Germany for questionable payments. Now it must face U.S. regulators under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Free Papers, Costly Competition

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

These are difficult times in the free (advertising-based) newspaper industry. The industry leader has been Metro International, which has expanded to more than 70 cities worldwide but lost $32.7 million on sales of $314 million in the first nine months of 2007.

You Say Guanxi, I Say Schmoozing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Making good use of connections and networks has always been important in business, particularly in China. Now guanxi, loosely translated as relationships or connections, is undergoing some changes.

The New Financial Heavyweights

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

The investment world is now changing as sovereign funds make up a significant portion of capital open to investment.

What's in a Name? Fatter Profits

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Taiwanese contract manufacturing firms have generally remained quietly in the background, happy to produce products at low costs for other branded companies. This is now changing.

Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Critical Thinking / Decision Making

Mahindra & Mahindra (Mahindra), an Indian conglomerate with more than $4.5 billion in sales, has been making automobiles for more than 50 years. According to the BusinessWeek article Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra? (November 5, 2007), it plans to introduce a line of trucks and SUVs in the U.S. in 2009.


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