Regions

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The United States has the biggest agriculture industry on earth, yet farmers face mounting pressure from Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. Those rival countries, as well as others, are well-positioned to profit from the United States pulling back from trade deals.

Blowing Down That Fiduciary Rule

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

On Feb. 3, President Trump issued a memo ordering the Department of Labor to reconsider the fiduciary rule, which will require financial advisers to put their clients’ interests first when handling retirement accounts and makes it easier for investors to sue financial companies. Many on Wall Street hate it.

Big Meat Braces for a Labor Shortage

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants are not the most enjoyable places to work, and while the pay typically exceeds minimum wage, employers have a hard time attracting and keeping employees. In order to keep operations running and meat prices at levels customers have come to expect, plants have increasingly turned to immigrant and/or refugee labor. With the recently announced travel and refugee ban, many workers that had hoped to build a life in America and bring their families to join them, now wonder if they can ever achieve the American Dream, and meat processing plants wonder if they will be able to find enough workers to fill the jobs.

Startup Types Build Ready-Made Activism

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

Techies are becoming more political with a range of websites that walk visitors through, among other things, complaints to Congress. According to Y Combinator partner Daniel Gross, “Many citizens across this country are frustrated or alarmed by what’s going on, and everyone has the ability to go and protest.”

Can Sneaker Makers Come Home Again?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Athletic footwear makers may bring some manufacturing back to the United States to save on shipping and perhaps avoid a Trump Twitter tirade. But the factories are likely to be highly automated and create few jobs.

Can Sneaker Makers Come Home Again?

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

U.S. shoemakers expected $450 million in tariff cuts in the first year of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would have freed up funds to speed a shift of production to America. It's dead, but they still plan to add U.S. jobs, just not the kind President Donald Trump promised.

Good Deals Make Good Neighbors

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The political relationships between countries in the Middle East are complicated, with history, religion, and territorial disputes causing many impediments to cooperation. While Israeli diplomats may have difficulty working with counterparts from Arab countries, that doesn't keep Israeli businesses from doing business with Arab governments. The logistics of keeping these business relationships obscured, however, can be challenging.

Can Sneaker Makers Come Home Again?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The manufacturing of sneakers has been a labor-intensive process, and thus, much of the manufacturing has taken place in low-wage nations. With changes in design and new manufacturing techniques, it may be economic to move some production closer to markets. This will reduce shipping costs, while shortening the time to market and making it easier for manufacturers to quickly respond to shifting demand.

Student Loans

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Navient's student loan advice may have left borrowers confused — and poorer. Recently filed government lawsuits allege that, in an attempt to minimize its costs, Navient put some distressed borrowers in more debt by steering them into plans that put off payments and ballooned their balances and interest costs instead of recommending income-based repayment programs that are more expensive to administer. Regulators estimate that households’ debt burden may have been inflated by billions of dollars.

IBM’s Big Jobs Dodge

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

While IBM talks about Trump-pleasing hiring plans, it's firing thousands. IBM pledged to hire 25,000 workers over four years, but it's continuing to fire American workers and move their jobs abroad. It wasn't long before employees were accusing the company's CEO of hypocrisy.

NATO Makes It Rain

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

NATO members will increase military budgets and spending, amid doubt they can rely on the United States. However, some members will fall short of the mandatory 2 percent of GDP. Weapons makers look forward to a spending spree as stocks surge.

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Red State Venture Capital

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Venture capitalists seek investments that offer high returns and now, offer good stories. Start-up companies that seek to help fight the invasive Asian carp offer a solution to that problem, jobs, and hopefully more than a good fish story.

Pharma's Worst Nightmare

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Celebration of Trump’s victory by pharmaceutical executives turned to fear when he suggested they should bid for the government’s business as well as bring manufacturing back to the U.S. But Trump will have to overcome the powerful pharmaceutical lobby to get such measures through the Republican Congress.

In Brazil, It's Now Beer—Without the Babes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Brazil is an important market in the worldwide beer industry, and this is the season for summertime beer ads. Compared to other years, however, the ads are a little more tame and less sexy. While this may be partly related to changing advertising norms, it also reflects the increasing importance of women as customers.

Designed in Davos, Tested in Zimbabwe

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Bringing insurance to the world's poor would seem to be a difficult proposition. Blue Marble Microinsurance, backed by industry giants like American International Group, is starting with crop insurance, which could be a key to agricultural development and longer term emergence of other insurance markets.

The Sundance Kid

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

How Shivani Rawat, a 31-year-old Indian American woman, became the "it" indie producer.

Netflix Presents: Building a World of Binge-Watchers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Netflix has been gradually building a subscriber base in Central and South America. A key step in attracting customers to its subscription video service was to help develop the infrastructure that facilitated high-speed streaming. Netflix has also developed original content specifically for South American consumers.

Dollar So Ripped, It Might Actually Rip

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The dollar has surged to a 14-year high against other major currencies, and it could go even higher. That could slam U.S. manufacturing and trigger capital flight from emerging markets that could choke the global economy.

When the Teacher Is An Ocean Away

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

From her own experience as a high school student, Cindy Mi realized that teachers can have a huge influence, good and bad, on a student's attitude and success. She worked for a time at her uncle's school doing tutoring before starting her own company. Recognizing the desire of Chinese parents to have the best education possible for the child, including English language instruction, and the relatively low pay of teachers in North America, she started a company for online tutoring that pairs Chinese youth with North American teachers.

Republican Tax Reform Seen Shrinking Corporate Bond Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Republicans’ planned tax reforms could slash the size of the U.S. corporate bond market by as much as a third due to the elimination of the elimination of the interest tax deduction. Forecasting the precise impact of any tax code changes on businesses is difficult because there are so many unknowns, but if the tax incentive to issue bonds starts to disappear, issuance and outstanding debt levels will likely drop.

The Show Must Go On

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

Scrambling for tickets, long lines, and warm beer has discouraged the concert-going public. Matt Jones, along with other concert start-ups, wants to give you a reason to try again.

China Challenges the Giants With Low Fares

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's state-owned airlines are adding international routes and gaining marketshare from international competitors. Part of the reason behind their success is price-based competition that allows customers to save hundreds of dollars compared to other large international competitors. But the growth is also attributable to an increasing number of Chinese customers who may favor domestic over foreign carriers.

Heavenly Tax Reform

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

After years of gridlock, corporate tax reform now appears virtually certain. It suddenly seems that everyone agrees the U.S. corporate tax rates and policies have been placing American business at a disadvantage.

Europe's Big Airlines Struggle for Altitude

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The European airline industry has been undergoing consolidation, much like that in the United States. And just like in the Unites States, European airlines face stiff competition from low-cost, no-frills carriers. But what remains different is that the large airline groups still operate multiple brands, and with state ownership interests, it is difficult for these airlines to achieve the cost savings of their North American counterparts.

Rich Kids Anonymous

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

A spoiled rich kid with no prospects takes lessons from his own life to build a treatment program that works despite the negative connotations of “afluenza.”

No Scoop Necessary

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

A hypoglycemic attorney with a passion for ice cream came up with a solution that appeals to both dieters and bodybuilders: high-protein, low-sugar Halo Top.

Get in the Hole!

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

Topgolf takes a concept created in England almost two decades ago and makes it one of the fastest-growing entertainment chains in the U.S.

Monetizing Lost Vacation Time

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Workaholic Americans accumulate hundreds of hours of unused leave. Recognizing this issue, a startup company hopes to redefine the vacation-leave benefit. PTO Exchange is building a business that provides innovative options for unlocking the value of employees’ unused vacation time.

Como se dice 'Uber'?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After ceding China, Uber, the ride-hailing giant, plans to double its presence in Latin America by the end of 2017. As long as Uber’s competitors there try to make money on each ride, the region will remain far more affordable for Uber than India or China.

Importing Business Lessons from El Norte

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

Young adults educated in the United States are returning home to Colombia and Peru to start their own business. Some families are disappointed.

Baby, You Can Rent My Car

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Carpooling service Amovens has added a peer-to-peer car-rental option by which car owners can rent out their personal vehicles. The business model is being used by thousands of car owners across Europe, where people are trying to make car ownership more affordable.

Halal’s Rise From Street Carts to Whole Foods

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

There is a growing appetite for halal food in the United States that appears to defy social stereotypes and political bias. In 1998, there were about 200 places that served halal food; today, there are 7,600. At every level of the U.S. food chain, halal already occupies a small but rapidly expanding niche.

America’s Biggest 401(k) Adviser Has a Plan to Manage All of Your Money

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Financial Engines, a company based in Sunnyvale, Calif., dominates in-house retirement fund advice. Now it wants to give people with middle-class incomes wide-ranging, soup-to-nuts financial advice the same way they get health insurance–through their employers. Whether that can be done profitably is a big question.

As Flocks Shrink, Congregations Scramble to Adapt

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Those attending church regularly have declined dramatically in recent years, while those who never attend have increased. It would appear that the target of those who attend occasionally may provide an opportunity for survival, but will it look the same?

More Older Americans Are Still Working - But Not All of Them Want to

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

You may have heard of a 401(k). That is actually a reference to a section within the Internal Revenue Code. This article refers to 401(k) and suggests that it partially explains why many older people continue to work.

America Still Makes Things but Sometimes Needs Foreign Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While there have been shifts in manufacturing over the past few decades, there are still opportunities for manufacturing to thrive in developed countries such as the United States. Globalfoundries' facility in New York makes semiconductor wafers and employs 3,000 people with an average salary of $92,000. 9to5 Seating, a Calilfornia-based chair manufacturer, exports quality components from its U.S. factory to China, where assembled chairs are then sold in markets such as Saudi Arabia and China.

Vacancy

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Prison populations are rapidly shrinking, and Corrections Corporation of America’s stock is down. So private prison companies are diversifying into community corrections and rehabilitation, but critics of for-profit prisons remain concerned.

Hold the Spring Rolls

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

On a recent Saturday night, dozens of young people packed Night + Market, a Thai restaurant on West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip. A server with a man bun and a bubblegum-pink apron rushed around with plastic plates. There may have been music; it was hard to tell over all the shouted conversations. The cumulative effect was more TGI Fridays than fine dining — a comparison Night + Market chef Kris Yenbamroong embraces.

Pro Sports Bets on Video Stars for Growth

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

The growth and popularity of e-sports has caught the attention of pro soccer and football leagues. If you're a top-notch video gamer, they may be looking for you.

Wheeler Dealer

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

When Zak Pashak's Detroit Bikes factory opened in 2013, bicycle manufacturing in the United States had all but disappeared. Today, the company makes 80 bicycles a day and is on pace to produce 10,000 this year.

Margrethe Vestager, European Commissioner for Competition

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Margrethe Vestager, European Commissioner for Competition, discusses several issues involving European antitrust policy toward American technology companies.

Every Move You Make Every Click You Take Every Game You Play Every Place You Stay I'll Be Watching

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

IDI has already built a profile on every American adult, including young people. Its database service, idiCORE, combines public records with purchasing, demographic, and behavioral data. IDI is the first to centralize and weaponize all that information for its customers.

S&P 500 Rises to Record as Dollar Gains on Jobs Data; Bonds Fall

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

U.S. stocks hit a new record this week after an expectedly good jobs report, but Treasuries prices fell as expectations for a Fed rate hike by the end of the year increase.

A $12 Billion Fund Beats All Peers Picking Stocks Once a Year

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

SunAmerica's Timothy Pettee is beating all of his stock picking rivals without spending a lot of time picking stocks. His quantitative model chooses 30 companies once a year based on cheap prices, profitability and a high dividend yield. The fund's cumulative return has beat the S&P 500 Index consistently over the last 10 years.

The Fix for Immigration

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The U.S. Supreme court reached a four-to-four deadlock on the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans program. Under that program undocumented immigrant parents of U.S. citizens or legal residents are shielded from deportation.

Designed by Comcast in Philadelphia

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Historically, Comcast has not been one of America’s most loved companies, and it had a reputation for providing clunky cable boxes and poor customer service. But Comcast is changing and wants to be loved. Instead of simply providing cable boxes and access to ever-changing lists of television channels, Comcast wants to make the TV the home’s command center. In doing so, Comcast needs to change its corporate culture to be more like a cool technology company and less like a regulated utility monopoly.

Letting Mom-To-Be Sit

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

There has been a recent stream of added protection to pregnant employees. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2015 that pregnant workers can claim discrimination if employers place an “undue burden” on them without justification.

How Finance Ruined Business

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The book "Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and Fall of American Business" adds up the ill effects of Wall Street’s zero-sum game. It's a timely read for current business students.

The Market Sizes Up

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Brick-and-mortar clothing retailers have traditionally been reluctant to make plus-size clothing a prominent part of their product offerings. However, over the past several years the demand for plus-size clothing has outpaced smaller-size offerings.

The Ivy League Rejects the UAW

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Should graduate students, who are paid to teach classes and assist with research, be classified as employees who can choose to be represented by a union? Part of the answer to this question depends on who controls the executive branch, as policy has changed somewhat between the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations. Another aspect of the answer relates to whether graduate students are doing the work as part of their educational development, or whether they are assigned work and receive pay similar to typical employees.

The Real Superhero

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

2016 is expected to be a record-setting year for films. Disney is leading the way with their expected blockbusters. Much of the strength in their lineup has been generated by acquisitions of other studios.

What's Not To Love?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Despite the popularity of the hit musical Hamilton, his pro-business and big-government ideas would not have made him popular today. His economic nationalism was a pragmatic search for policies that worked, regardless of ideology. But if they were tailored to better fit the current realities, Hamilton's views could be just what the country needs now.

Resuscitating Gap

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Gap returns to t-shirts in yet another bid for growth. Can the slumping company Gap figure out what shoppers want to wear?

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The U.S. television industry produced more than 400 scripted series last year, a record. That’s causing shortages. An explosion in American television production is threatening to overwhelm filming facilities from California to Canada and Georgia.

The U.S. Is a Big Oil Importer Again

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Now that U.S. oil producers are allowed to export oil after a long ban, those exports have stalled. U.S. oil production has fallen approximately 600,000 barrels a day since peaking in 2015, and imports have filled the gap.

Companies Pitch In On Student Debt

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

With the average amount of student loan debt growing, some employers are seeing a silver lining of opportunity in what is often characterized as a social problem. By offering to match employee student loan payments, employers can provide an attractive benefit that helps recruit young highly educated workers. These benefits may help alleviate the burden of student debt help address a potential crisis regarding retirement savings.

The Selling of the American MBA

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Half of U.S. business schools may not be operating in 10 to 15 years, according to an industry source. With U.S. enrollment down, B-schools are wooing foreigners; in 2015, international candidates accounted for 58 percent of the applicant pool at full-time MBA programs.

Where Retirement Isn't Job One

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Brooks Brothers is regularly retaining workers who normally would have been forced out of employment years ago. While older employees tend to cost more, their experience and skills often make the investment in them worthwhile.

Do European Banks Need a Tissue? Or a Transfusion?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is the fall in Europe's bank stocks a matter of investors waking up to the reality that, in a post-crisis world, banking will be a slower-growing, lower-earning business? Or is it a sign that the banks are weak enough to pose a risk again to Europe's economy and financial stability? The answers appear to be yes and yes.

Will Seniors Be Robot Cars' Early Adopters?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Automakers are targeting elderly drivers eager to retain their mobility as lifestyle leaders of a new technology. Google thinks self-driving cars will be great for stranded seniors.

Sprint's Plan to Mortgage Its Airwaves

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Sprint is facing $34 billion in debt. They plan to borrow from a subsidiary that they will create.

Verizon Has Flipped For Video

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

With an eye on millennials, Verizon Communications goes big on mobile streaming. It’s counting on its new Go90 service to pull in ad revenue.

Can You Patent This?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Although tech companies from Apple to Google have for years fought patent wars over smartphone features, search technology, and computer chips, banks largely ignored the patent office and gained a reputation for keeping their internal processes to themselves. Now, the biggest U.S. banks and payments networks are applying for more patents than ever before.

Deutsche Bank Investors Get a Scare

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Convertible contingent bonds (CoCos) have been a good investment up until recently. Unfortunately, problems Deutsche Bank is having with its CoCos have contributed to a large recent drop in their share price.

Can You Patent This?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Banks are now competing with software companies in seeking finance patents. Banks have been motivated in part by suits over the way they encode and transmit data on transactions.

Payday Lenders On the Run

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Many players in the high-cost loan industry are eager to get out as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau readies new regulations that it says will stop borrowers from taking short-term loans they can't afford. Some loans have interest rates as high as 780 percent.

Payday Lenders On the Run

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CPFB) will be issuing rules soon on payday lending. The key regulation pertains to lenders who charge more than 36 percent interest: They'll have to make sure that potential borrowers will have enough money to pay back their loans.

Stealing White

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Walter Liew spent decades collecting information about DuPont's proprietary process for producing titanium oxide, a compound used to make things white. Much of the information that he obtained came from disgruntled former DuPont employees. While DuPont has elaborate security processes designed to protect its titanium oxide process, Liew's success shows that former employees are a potential point of vulnerability for trade secrets. Corporations may find it valuable to maintain the loyalty of former employees, especially those with sensitive knowledge.

No Cheers When Wal-Mart Packs Up

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Wal-Mart is closing a whole division of its retail stores in smaller communities. The push for growth created underperforming stores for the company and closed many small retailers that couldn’t compete with them. Now the people in these communities have no local outlets for buying basic goods.

The World’s Favorite New Tax Haven Is the United States

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has the United States become a prime tax shelter destination?

The Iran Invasion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The multinational agreement regarding Iran's nuclear program has opened the door for many foreign firms to pursue business deals in Iran. Not only are many foreign business leaders visiting Iran, but on a recent trip to Europe, the country's president, Hassan Rouhani, closed deals with several European firms. Most American firms, however, still have significant restrictions on what they can do in Iran.

Why Doesn't Silicon Valley Hire Black Coders?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Although African Americans comprise about 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for only about 1 percent of the technical employees at most Silicon Valley companies. There are multiple explanations behind this statistic, with many companies taking steps to try and boost employment of African Americans.

Facing a Price War, Uber Bets on Volume

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How is Uber’s income affected by the company's continued trend of lowering fare prices every January for the last three years?

The IPO Aimed At Iran

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why would Saudi Arabia consider an IPO at this time of historically low oil prices? Saudi Arabia is considering a new strategic ally in its cold war against Iran: The world’s 330 million owners of publicly traded stock.

SUVs Are T-Boning the Family Sedan

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

As we enter 2016, the demand for small SUVs has been soaring. Due in large part to the sleeker designs, better fuel economy, and enhanced technological and safety features, small SUVS are on pace to overtake family sedans as America’s top selling vehicle.

The Kayak of Tickets Thinks Bigger

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After a snub, SeatGeek is trying to beat StubHub at its own game. SeatGeek is betting on a revamped mobile interface to siphon business from StubHub and Ticketmaster.

At Walmart, a Season For Guns and Tinsel

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Amid anxiety over mass killings, arms and ammo keep selling. America's gun king, Walmart, is geared up for the holiday rush.

Insuring the Toys of the Wealthy

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Writing insurance policies for the possessions of the 1 Percent is a $40 billion business. Privilege Underwriters Reciprocal Exchange, which specializes in insuring the ultrarich, has seen its business grow least 40 percent a year since 2006.

A Big Bike Maker Steers Uptown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Taiwanese bike maker Giant Manufacturing's U.S. sales grew 13.8 percent in the first half of 2015, as it pushed higher-end products. The firm is looking to aggressively expand its market presence in the U.S.

Pfizer's $160 Billion Change of Address

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Pfizer will make its $160 billion deal with Allergan look like the much smaller Allergan has acquired Pfizer. This will allow the merged company to claim its tax location in Dublin and cut its taxes in half. The Pfizer CEO and the U.S. president disagree on whether this is responsible corporate behavior.

Pfizer's $160 Billion Change of Address

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To understand the logic behind the merger of Allergan and Pfizer, the relative corporate tax rates of the U.S. and Ireland make it simple--35 percent and 12.5 percent, respectively. As a U.S.-based company, Pfizer's worldwide profits were taxed at 35 percent. In what is referred to as a tax inversion, Ireland-based Allergan technically purchased the much bigger Pfizer.

Startups Give Airbnb Hosts a Helping Hand

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Urban short-stay industry attracts full-time hosts and startups. Investors face resistance from city governments and hotel groups. AirBnb enhances its value proposition and achieves/sustains a competitive advantage for its hosts and guests.

Carnival Rocks the Boat

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Under Chief Executive Officer, Arnold Donald, Carnival’s share price is up 53 percent. Carnival's net income is up 15 percent. How has he done it?

More Women Punch The B-School Ticket

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Men sit up and listen as women fill 40% of business school seats. Although women hold about half of middle-management jobs, there are only 22 female CEOs at America’s largest companies. Harvard `Manbassadors' support work flexibility and equal pay.

No-Retirement-Plan Starter Pack

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Even though Americans are living longer and must save more for old age than prior generations, almost half of U.S. workers don't have a company-sponsored retirement plan and few workers save anything outside of employer-sponsored plans. With the huge number of baby boomers reaching retirement age, concerns are mounting about how to fix a system that excludes so many.

No-Retirement-Plan Starter Pack

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

As people live longer, fewer of them have employer-sponsored retirement plans to help support them in their old age. Only 8 percent of eligible taxpayers contribute to an IRA or Roth IRA.

Google Books' Win May Threaten Other Media

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Google can legally scan books for online viewing, according to a recent ruling by the Second Circuit. The effects of the ruling could spread to other forms of media.

Silicon Valley Investors Look North

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Canada is becoming an increasingly attractive location for software companies, as employment in the Canadian hardware industry drops. Canada’s venture funding has doubled in five years, to $2.4 billion.

Heir Conditioning

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sometimes the children and grandchildren of the superwealthy aren’t so good at maintaining the wealth they inherit. Professionals now advise the superwealthy on how to increase the odds that their descendants wisely use their inheritances.

Indian Casino Bets Pay Off for Och-Ziff

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Indian casino investments helped an Och-Ziff fund return almost 23 percent from 2011 through June 2015. The hedge fund offers expensive loans to tribes with limited options. It leases slot machines and gets as much as 20 percent of net revenue.

Credit and Debit Cards Lag on Upgrades

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

The deadline to have all credit and debit cards chip-equipped has passed. Many cards still use magnetic strips that aren't as secure.

Stetson’s Cowboy Spirit Lives On

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The once-famous Stetson hat company is struggling. To keep the company relevant, CEO Izumi Kajimoto is no longer relying on cowboy culture. Instead, Stetson is pursuing the hipster market by offering an eclectic, trendy mix of hats.

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Forget about streaming video or downloading or uploading large files if you live in Cuba. With fewer than 4 percent of homes having access to the Internet, Cuba has some of the worst Internet access in the world. How does Castro’s government respond to the market demand for better Internet access and control access to information?

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Not everyone has access to the Internet. Fewer than 4 percent of homes in Cuba have online access.

The Contagion Out of China

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

On August 24, the DJIA fell almost 1,100 points when investors were panicked by a wave of stock selling that began in Shanghai. While U.S. markets rebounded somewhat over the next few days, it is now clear that China plays a major role in the health of the global economy. China still has a lot of strengths, but it is losing the trust of investors for the first time in several years.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

Moving From Dot-Com to Not-Com

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Eponymous private domains are not a cybersecurity cure-all but may help foil some phony merchandise or phishing scams. The middle ground between an eponymous domain name and a .com includes new dot-categories that leave room for speculators known as cybersquatters.

Things Are About to Get Ugly at Kraft

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

3G Capital and Warren Buffett are focused on cost-cutting and operational efficiency to boost profits at moribund Kraft. But analysts are concerned about the long-term value of the firm's brands in the evolving packaged-foods industry.

Things Are About to Get Ugly at Kraft

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Warren Buffett and 3G Capital have made one big promise: They’ll cut $1.5 billion in annual costs from Kraft Heinz before 2018. The company will lose employees, whole levels of management, and maybe a few brands, too. Will it be a boon to investors?

Skechers' Lesson From a Fad That Flopped

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Overproduction combined with an FTC investigation caused Skechers’ Shape-ups shoes to go from fad to fiasco. But the company rebounded. Skechers’ valuation has risen from $600 million at the end of 2011 to about $8 billion today.

Is a $15 Minimum Wage Too High?

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The debate over a $15 national minimum wage continues to elicit strong arguments on both sides of the issue.

A Technology That Reveals Your Feelings

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

A cousin of facial recognition, emotions analytics relies on video of facial expressions. This software sizes up your eyes, nose, mouth—even your wrinkles. The market for software that analyzes emotions could reach $10 billion worldwide by 2020.

A Technology That Reveals Your Feelings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Do you think you can fool your teacher when you’re not paying attention? Think again. Plans are in place for as many as 1,000 schools in North America to use a technology that monitors student’s emotions. This market could reach $10 billion worldwide by 2020 and raises questions about privacy.

Diebold’s New Executive Suite

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

When Diebold CEO Andy Mattes assembled his management team at Diebold, he decided it didn't really matter where people lived and didn't expect them to move to Canton, Ohio, where Diebold is headquartered. Thus, various senior managers live in cities across the country and have regular conference calls. Since many executives spend much of their time traveling anyway, Mattes decided it was more important to hire the best people rather than the best people willing to move to Canton.

They Come to Bury Gold, Not to Praise It

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Gold prices have tumbled to a five-year low and analysts are predicting they will fall even lower by December. The drop is due in part to the high likelihood that the Fed will increase interest rates this year, which will draw investors away from gold and into bonds.

'OK, Ready for Work Again!!!'

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Shigenobu Nagamori started Nidec in 1973, and turned his small motor-making business into one of Japan’s most profitable multinational corporations. Nagamori, who has been recognized as one of Japan’s top business leaders, has an uncommon leadership style: He emphasizes motivation, dedication, and hard work over talent and intelligence.

The Whiff of Price-Fixing Is Up In the Air

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

The recent rising profits reported by the major domestic airlines have led to an investigation by the Justice Department into possible collusion among airlines. Specifically, there is speculation that airlines may be working together to restrict seat capacity to keep fares, and ultimately profits, high.

Diva of Wall Street

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The SEC has filed a case against collateralized loan obligations (CLOs) operated by Patriarch Partners, which is controlled by Lynn Tilton. Tilton helped to develop the CLO market for securities in distressed industries. She says she protects American families from ruin. The SEC says she defrauded investors.

Coders Balk at Making Apps Searchable

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Only a few thousand mobile apps -- out of several million -- have links that enable their content to be searched, as coders are resistant to use deep links in apps. However, Google and Facebook claim the links create more traffic to the apps.

Nestle Tries a Different Recipe for Lean Cuisine

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Lean Cuisine sales are estimated to have fallen 20 percent during the past two years to about $800 million annually.

Die Grundertrainerin Will See You Now

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

You have to be crazy to begin a startup. Can I be your therapist?

Lucky Chuck

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With mad cow concerns abated, Irish beef is back on sale in the United States.

Wal-Mart Has Found a New Discount: Its Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Wal-Mart reduced its tax burden in recent years?

Nestle Tries a Different Recipe for Lean Cuisine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In a brand makeover, there's more emphasis on eating healthy and less on losing weight.

Whole Foods or Walmart?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Sales growth at established Whole Foods stores has slowed to 3.6 percent, far below the pace of organics overall. Who is eating their organic lunch?

Comcast Tries to Repair Its Customer Service

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Comcast, dubbed the “Worst Company in America,” is budgeting $300 million to improve customer service after scrapping its deal for Time Warner Cable. Will it be enough in a shrinking industry?

Owning Your Home Is Good for the Kids

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Homes are the leading asset of the middle class and the main source of middle-class wealth, so the long decline in homeownership rates will widen wealth inequality.

McDonald’s Revamp Has Missing Ingredients

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has McDonald’s decided to respond to a decline in share price?

Comcast Tries to Repair Its Customer Service

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Comcast says it’s budgeting $300 million to improve customer service after scrapping its deal for Time Warner Cable. The company turns to Twitter and an app to improve its image.

Owning Your Home Is Good for the Kids

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Fewer homeowners mean greater income inequality.

Dear Microsoft . . .

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Do Silicon Valley tech companies use a permanent tier of second-class workers?

Dear Microsoft . . .

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Microsoft’s contract workers are the latest to force a big tech company to improve benefits for outsourced labor. Does collective bargaining apply to technology companies?

Small Business Finds Its Voice on Free Trade

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Small businesses have a growing stake in the trade debate, thanks to a big jump in their exports since 2007. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2013, annual exports by small and medium U.S. companies accounted for 33.6 percent of all U.S. exports.

In Plain Sight

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Swiss bank executives have been subject to criminal liability in the U.S. for assisting Americans with tax evasion.

The Secret Sauce

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How Buffalo Wild Wings turned the sports bar into a $1.5 billion juggernaut.

A Virtual Garage Sale Takes on Craigslist

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Startup VarageSale competes with Craigslist by focusing on mobile and has raised $34 million in venture funding.

Coke’s Unlikely Savior

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

U.S. cola consumption is falling by about 4 percent a year. Soda makers are seeking new sweeteners to reverse the trend.

Sirius Business

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would the revenue of SiriusXM be affected if the company was to lose Howard Stern?

Venezuela’s Currency Is a Boon to Smugglers

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Venezuelans sell price-controlled goods for more in Colombia.

High-Speed Trading Comes to Japan

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Automated high-frequency trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange has forced most human traders out of their jobs.

Making Washington Fall in Love With Pizza Again

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The $37 billion pizza industry wants Congress to roll back regulations designed to get Americans to eat fewer slices.

Now Hear This

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

New audio technology manufacturers are trying to break into the $6 billion hearing-aid market.

America Roams Far Behind Europe

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

U.S. carriers aren't following foreign companies' fee cuts.

The Pipeline Flows Again

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Drugmakers are enjoying a rush of new medicines, but their high costs threaten the pace of innovation.

How Kellogg Lost Breakfast

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The American breakfast experience has changed, and Kellogg is in trouble.

How Productive is the U.S.?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The little-understood measure is crucial to managing the economy.

Intel Buys Its Way Deeper Into China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The company is spending billions on factories and state-owned rivals.

Are Credit Suisse, RBS, Standard Chartered, HSBC, and Barclays Terrorist Banks?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What kind of liability are major banks facing for being the conduit for money used in terrorist activities?

It's Raining Cars in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The booming market for autos in China has caused automakers to expand capacity faster than the demand warrants.

Whole Foods, Half Off

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How is Whole Foods planning to maintain its profitability in the face of increasing competition?

Read Delta's Lips: No New Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why are Delta and other airlines making billions in profits yet paying no income taxes?

Prudential Piles on the Pensions

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Big U.S. companies are trying to escape the burden of ballooning pension obligations by paying an insurance company to take them over.

Starbucks: Howard Schultz on the Coffee Chain's Expansion Under His Leadership

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Howard Schultz had to create a coffee culture in the United States in order for his company to thrive.

Michael Milken on Junk Bonds as Part of the "Prosperity Formula"

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Junk bonds and other types of "financial technology" developed in the 1970s and 1980s allowed entrepreneurs in non-investment-grade companies to create millions of net new jobs in America and ended the institutionalized denial of capital to women and minorities.

Why America Needs an Exit Tax

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

As the IRS tightens up on the requirement for U.S. citizens living abroad to pay income taxes, a growing number of wealthy Americans living abroad have given up their citizenship and taken their wealth elsewhere. Is it time for an exit tax?

Payday Loans Move Onto the Reservation

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Web-based payday lenders have been moving to Native American reservations to avoid state regulation.

The Stockpicker's Last Stand

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

After suffering outflows of $250 billion from 2008 through 2013, Capital Group is still trying to convince investors that traditional stockpicking, if practiced by the right people, can beat the market averages over the long haul.

Port Dispute May Mean No Christmas in Hawaii

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Overstaffing at some ports is leading to a work slowdown, affecting imports and exports.

Will Americans Finally Get a Raise?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A tightening job market no longer guarantees higher pay.

Apple Enters the Mobile Pay Fray With a Running Start

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Registers across America will soon accept Apple Pay. The next trick will be getting people to use it.

Facing America’s Other Middle-Class Squeeze

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Defined-contribution retirement plans offer U.S. corporations cost savings today, but are the long-term social costs untenable?

Adidas's World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Adidas's sales in the United States are down 14 percent this year due to weak sales in basketball and golf.

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

A Showdown Over Housing Discrimination

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The U.S. Supreme Court is deciding whether to hear a Texas case involving the use of the disparate impact standard in Fair Housing Act litigation.

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Direct investment in China is down, as foreign companies face increased scrutiny from the Chinese government.

Southwest Hangs Up Its Low-Cost Jersey

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Just as Southwest has grown - becoming America's fourth largest airline - so have its costs. With fares more in line with larger rivals, Southwest is no longer the industry's low-cost leader.

Haters Gonna Hate

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In spite of what hoards of critics predicted, the Fed's stimulus has led to a $1 trillion bond rally, lower unemployment, and almost no inflation.

Southwest Hangs Up Its Low-Cost Jersey

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Southwest has all but lost its position as the cost leader among airlines but has shown no signs of a change in strategy.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

After success in Scandinavia and Britain, Netflix sets its sights on Germany and France.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What plans does Netflix have for expansion in Europe?

Made in Memphis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising transportation costs and wage rates in China are causing firms to relocate manufacturing to the Southeast U.S.

Made in Memphis

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Manufacturing is slowly returning to the U.S. -- and much of the action is in the South.

Made in Memphis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How have tax incentives and labor costs affected the location of new manufacturing plants in the South?

Saving an Endangered Fish by Eating More of It

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Can Whole Foods help save an endangered Amazonian fish by getting U.S. consumers to eat more of it?

Saving an Endangered Fish by Eating More of It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Greater demand for paiche could attract commercial fish farmers.

The Ninja Turtles Save Summer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hollywood is suffering from overcrowding during its key season.

Student Debt

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Older Americans, who hold 5 percent of all U.S. student debt, owe nearly five times as much as they did in 2005.

The Hedge Fund and the Despot

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Did a Wall Street titan's money bail out Robert Mugabe in his hour of need?

Taking AIG From "Sucks" to "Rocks"

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What are AIG’s plans after the bailout, and why are they emphasizing profits over market share?

Taking AIG From "Sucks" to "Rocks"

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can AIG's new CEO overcome the problems in the insurance giant and get it to focus on a strategy that favors profitability over growth?

Free Trade Man

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

American special effects professionals are losing work to tax-subsidized firms in foreign countries.

The Chinese TV Maker Taking Aim at Sony

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hisense is moving up in worldwide market share of television sets and is challenging Sony for the #3 position.

Who's Got the Best Retirement Plan?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

For a worker starting at $50,000 a year, the difference between a good 401(k) plan and a weak one can be $870,000.

Who's Got the Best Retirement Plan?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Some companies offer employees much more generous 401(k) plans than others.

The Highway Trust Fund to Hell

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

With the Highway Trust Fund going broke, how should the crumbling U.S. transportation infrastructure be paid for?

The Highway Trust Fund to Hell

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

As Americans drive fewer miles in more fuel-efficient vehicles, the Highway Trust Fund's cash meter is almost on empty.

You Know You Want Him

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

How does a first-generation American move into the role of becoming a highly sought after spokesperson and a business-empire builder? Rapper Pitbull does it one partnership at a time.

Big Enough to Drive a Government Contract Through

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How are former U.S. corporations that reincorporated overseas to avoid taxes still winning U.S. government contracts?

Crazed Pervert or Misunderstood Genius?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The ouster of American Apparel's CEO shines a light on the company's uneasy balance of idealistic social responsibility with a variety of transgressions.

Crazed Pervert or Misunderstood Genius?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

American Apparel founder and CEO Dov Charney is struggling to get his company back.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The next car an American purchases—even if it has a German or Japanese brand name—might just be made in Mexico.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Thanks to low labor costs and a booming U.S. market, it appears that Mexico will soon produce more cars than Brazil.

Why Mexico is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

With labor costs just 20 percent of those in the United States, Mexico could pass Brazil to become the No. 7 auto producer.

What Are They Doing at Monsanto?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What effect does the controversy over GMO seeds have on Monsanto?

Yes, You Can Be Fired For Being Gay

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

President Obama is about to issue an executive order barring federal contractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Think Old.

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Volvo owner Zhejiang Geely is investing $11 billion to revive Volvo’s popularity, especially in the U.S. where sales fell 55 percent in the past decade.

The 23-Year-Olds Will Save America

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Younger millennials have the numbers on their side.

If Only They Had Listened...

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

GM didn't just ignore whistle-blowers, it shut them up.

Droid Killer?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Cheap smartphones running Firefox’s mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

Brokers Take Rollovers For a Ride

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Some financial companies and advisors may be chasing high commissions and fees by pushing clients to rollover their 401(k) accounts into risky investments.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

America’s Got Milk And China Wants It

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

U.S. dairy exports set records with growing global demand.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Love Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the current state of the market for cruise lines in Asia, and how will it change in the future?

Modesty is the New Abercrombie

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Abercrombie is hoping to bring back teens who’ve left the mall and are shopping with their smartphones.

Modesty is the New Abercrombie

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Abercrombie & Fitch is hoping to bring back teens who are leaving the mall. Is there still time to save the brand?

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nike is making a big push to catch Adidas in the soccer gear market.

Americans' New Piggy Bank: The 401(k)

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

In 2011, Americans took about $57 billion from retirement accounts before they were supposed to.

Americans’ New Piggybank: The 401(k)

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Does the penalty for early withdrawal from 401(k) plans keep taxpayers from withdrawing their savings?

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

An estimated 300 million people play the game and 1 billion people watch it. Soccer represents a growing global market and Nike wants to take it over.

Bar Fight

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A long running family feud in Guatemala adds drama to AB InBev's attempts to gain market share.

Big Pharma’s Favorite Prescription: Higher Prices

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Americans spent $263 billion in 2012 on prescription drugs, 11 percent more than the $236 billion spent in 2007. Why do some industry experts predict drug inflation is not going to end?

Why Medicare Keeps Paying Sketchy Docs

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the extent of Medicare fraud in the United States, and is anything being proposed to fix this problem?

Tech Hubris

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The founders of some of Silicon Valley’s most iconic tech companies conspired to suppress salaries. When it came to their employees, where did their entrepreneurial spirits and commitment to meritocracy go?

China's Pollution Police Are Watching

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With only three of the seventy-four Chinese cities monitored last year having acceptable air quality, China is facing a national crisis with air pollution.

Fiat Finally Tries to Tune Up Alfa Romeo

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Fiat is planning to relaunch Alfa Romeo as an Italian brand to rival BMW and Audi.

The Richest Rich Are in A Class by Themselves

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

For the lucky few, it’s a return to the Roaring Twenties.

Good for Kids, Good for Publishers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

First Book Marketplace accounted for 2 percent of all juvenile books sold in the United States last year to an unlikely audience at a surprising price. Why is everyone involved winning?

Companies Keep Piling Up Cash Overseas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S.-based companies use legal tax loopholes to minimize their U.S. tax bills but must keep their cash invested overseas to do so.

In the Diaper Wars, Every Pee Point Counts

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Proctor & Gamble invented the disposable diaper and has continued an intensive R&D program to maintain its position in this mature market.

In the Diaper Wars, Every Pee Point Counts

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Procter & Gamble is trying to create a Pampers diaper that has zero leakage, ultimate dryness, and an ideal fit -- and is investing millions to do so.

Born-in-the-USA Luxury Gains in China

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China now accounts for more 25 percent of global luxury spending for U.S. brands, and U.S. sales are growing faster in China than pricier European luxury lines.

Tax Preparers Push the Benefits of Obamacare

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How are tax-prep firms helping customers sign up for Obamacare?

House Calls Without the Home Visits

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Investors are putting money into telehealth services used to treat common ailments.

Sony Bets That Jazz Can Still Be Hip

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Sony has revived a record label for jazz, a genre that sold 14 million albums in 2007 but only 5 million albums in 2013. Is the jazz audience still willing to pay to listen?

No Tax Breaks for Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Should the mortgage-interest deduction for yachts be repealed, and how much in tax revenue will it save if it is?

A Chinese Scandal Could Stall Nu Skin's Growth

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Nu Skin Enterprises, a maker of anti-aging skin products, has been criticized in the Chinese press for its sales and marketing practices.

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Student borrowing has reached a point where officials are comparing it to the mortgage crisis.

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Fed economists are increasingly concerned about the surge in student loans.

Barbarian At Gate C17

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Norwegian Air Shuttle is looking to bring low costs to long-haul flights.

Where Borrowers Couldn't Get a Break

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Former employees say Urban Lending stymied homeowners who sought mortgage modifications to avoid foreclosure.

A "Kill Switch" on Samsung Phones is DOA

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Don't wireless phone carriers want to stop smartphone theft? Maybe not.

GE's Lost Decade

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Including dividends, investors have had a total return of zero under Jeff Immelt’s twelve-year reign at GE although the S&P 500 returned 110 percent. Could this be a problem?

The J.Crew Invasion

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

J.Crew is invading London with American style at a higher price point. Will it succeed where others have failed?

Xbox One Tears Down Microsoft’s Walls

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Microsoft’s Xbox One has the hope that games and entertainment will collide into something even bigger and better. Will it make a difference in the decline of console purchases?

Forget Your Wallet

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

As smartphone usage continues to increase, mobile payment transactions are expected to take a 38 percent jump to $325 billion in 2014.

More Retirees + Poorer Workers = Big Trouble

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Every day for the next 16 years about 10,000 Americans will turn 65, a shift that will lower median income growth.

Hell to Pay

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The major banks are finally being forced to pay for some of their actions during and before the financial crisis. What are the effects on the banks going to be in the months ahead?

Hell to Pay

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Five years after the start of the financial crisis, banks are finally paying billions of dollars in fines. Is this enough punishment? Will it deter fraud in the future?

What a Pig Demon Says About Chinese Cinema

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Hollywood may have to embrace pig demons and Chinese language if it wants a bigger piece of China’s large and rapidly growing movie market.

A Cheaper Way to Defuse Patent Claims

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The 2011 America Invents Act has provided technology companies with a new tool to fight patent trolls: the patent review.

Mega Death

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Can Service Corporation International continue to grow in the business of funeral homes and cemeteries?

Card Companies Try To Conquer Myanmar

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Using plastic to pay at retailers is growing, but still a novelty in Myanmar.

Smut With A Smile

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Promoting the mantra “Keep Calm and Chive On,” TheChive.com is a tacky little frat-boy-like site –- with an annual revenue stream approaching $100 million.

A British Invasion Without the Mop Tops

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

British television producers look to global markets, including the United States, when developing new television shows.

The Big Bucks in Keeping Kids Focused

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The Irish drug company Shire is finding it more difficult to sell an ADHD drug when you can’t convince the target market that the condition it treats even exists. Shire wants that to change.

Yawning Through the Apocalypse

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Do investors have "calamity fatigue?" Wall Street’s fear index and other measures of anxiety show traders are giving the risk of a U.S. default a big yawn.

The Trouble With Fed Transparency

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Linking federal policy to specific jobless numbers confuses investors.

Yes, Real Men Drink Beer and Use Skin Moisturizer

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Not for women only: Sales of men’s grooming products—from exfoliating scrubs to self-tanning creams—are expected to rise 5 percent this year, building a $17.5 billion industry.

The Slow, Profitable Death of GM’s Big SUVs

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Large SUVs would seem to be an insignificant part of the car market, but this segment actually accounts for a good chunk of gross profit for GM and Chevrolet. Why is this, and will it continue?

Flipping Burgers In the Golden Years

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The median balance in retirement accounts of Americans aged 55 to 64 says it will be next to impossible for many boomers to finance their current standard of living through retirement.

The Trickle Down Has All But Dried Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Neither the middle class nor the poor have gained ground.

Hank Paulson On Facing The Abyss

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Get the ultimate insider's account, in Henry Paulson's own words, of the events and actions that triggered the 2008 crisis and how he helped stave off a total collapse of the financial system.

Hank Paulson On Facing The Abyss

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

This is what it was like to face the financial crisis.

A Culture Clash in the Yogurt Aisle

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Danone reacted to the competition from Chobani in the Greek yogurt market? Is the company's reaction effective?

The Boomer Car Boom

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Consumers aged 55 to 64 are far more likely to buy a new car than drivers under 34. Automakers have taken notice.

Amazon Goes on a Building Spree

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Will Amazon's warehouse strategy be effective?

The Feds' About-Face on Airline Mergers

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division is opposing the merger of American Airlines and US Airways.

What If Fast-Food Jobs Really Paid $15 an Hour?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With 3.9 million Americans working in fast-food outlets for an average wage of $9.00 per hour, some say the industry should implement a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour because it's the right thing to do.

In the U.S., Borrowing Is a Good Idea Again

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Households have drastically cut costs and can handle debt.

A Chinese Software Maker in a Texas State of Mind

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

NQ Mobile has two corporate headquarters (Dallas, USA, and Bejing, China) and two CEOs.

SAP Invades Silicon Valley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to capture market share in cloud computing, Germany's SAP is making acquisitions in California.

An Indian Tractor Maker Tries to Run LIke a Deere

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mahindra is exporting small tractors to the United States, trying to break into the market with better warranties and more attractive financing.

Hummus: The Great American Dip?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Makers of hummus are modifying traditional recipes to suit American tastes. Will it be the next salsa?

Nissan Brings Datsun Back to the Future

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

It worked before, and Nissan is betting it will work again. Nissan is dusting off its Datsun brand and will sell cars starting at less than $6,650 in Indonesia, Russia, and South Africa.

Beating the Market With Buy and Hold

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can a buy-and-hold strategy with high-dividend stocks beat the market? SunAmerica has a fund that appears to be doing just that.

The Agony of the American Rancher

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

American cattle ranchers are suffering from an extended period of drought, wildfires, and rising costs. As a result, the U.S. beef cattle herd is at its lowest level since the 1950s.

Crocs Wants You To Forget About Its Crocs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Crocs is looking at a new image and international growth to spur sales.

Switzerland Struggles With Bank Secrecy

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why has the Swiss Parliament voted not to allow Swiss banks to cooperate with the IRS?

Can E-mail Be Prism-Proofed?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Do you really think your e-mail is private?

This Prism Isn't Reflecting Much Light

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

How much privacy do we actually have? We still don't know.

Dunkin' Hopes You Stop And Smell the Coffee

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Dunkin' Donuts ranks second lowest in atmosphere score for beverage and snack shops, so it's no surprise that the majority of its sales occur before noon. To encourage more customers to come in the afternoon and linger, Dunkin' will have new store designs more in line with leading coffee chains.

Can Coach Keep Walking to the Bank?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Ralph Lauren did it. Can Coach? As Coach’s North American market share slips to 30 percent, the company hopes to leverage the luxury brand into other fashion categories. But why shoes?

Retirement Savings Done Right

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In Australia, at least 3 percent of every worker’s paycheck goes into a compulsory retirement savings program. Should Americans be required to save more for retirement?

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

The Post Office’s Back to the Future Rescue Plan

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

As a result of lower mail volumes and increased competition for package business, less than 20 percent of the nation's post offices generate enough business to cover costs.

The Man Who Ate the Internet

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Netflix now dominates the video-streaming business with more Internet traffic than all the other major players combined. And it all comes from the cloud via Amazon.

The Man Who Ate the Internet

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Netflix rebounded from the massive subscriber losses it suffered eighteen months ago? What do they plan to do in the future?

In Some Chinese Cities, the Tags Cost More Than the Car

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Even after significant government push, not one of the top 10 automobile brands sold in the People's Republic of China is Chinese. There are a number of forces in place that will make it difficult for local brands to gain ground in the near term.

Weaning U.S. Farmers Off Food Aid

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. farmers and shippers resist legislation that would help poor countries grow their own food.

Why More Extreme Foods Are Creeping Onto Menus

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Americans are eating healthier foods at home but not when they dine out. America’s fast-food industry has embraced rich, fatty, gooey extreme foods to grab diners' attention, and the Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich is just one example.

At Tax Time, It’s Good to Be an American

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How does America's tax system stack up against the rest of the world? The facts might surprise you.

A Craft Beer Pioneer Gets a Second Chance

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What does a 37-year-old beer taste like? New Albion Ale has been resurrected with the help of Boston Beer and their runs of 6,000 barrels exceed its total sales in the 1970s.

Would You Like Some PE in Your 401(k)?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Private equity funds want a slice of the $3.57 trillion that Americans have in 401(k) retirement plans. Target-date funds might be the way to do it.

What Good Are Low Prices If the Shelves Are Empty

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why have some customers been switching from Walmart to their competitors to shop? Has Walmart cut costs too far?

A Chinese Implant Takes Aim at Cochlear

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

What did you say? There's huge profits in helping people hear?

Toyota's Awesome Yen Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The yen falling 16 percent in the last five months translates to about an additional $1,500 cost advantage per each car made in Japan.

Toyota's Awesome Yen Advantage

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Toyota, which imports almost 30 percent of the vehicles it sells in the U.S., may yield an extra $1,500 in operating profit per car.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Estee Lauder is using its M.A.C. cosmetics line, a hit with ethnic consumers at home, to enter emerging markets.

An Online Food Fight, Big Apple Style

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Online grocers FreshDirect and Peapod are battling it out in New York City.

Welcome Back, Comrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Media companies are now producing original content sit-coms, dramas, and mini-series in Eastern European countries.

Sequestered America Could Be a Risky Place

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Unforeseen bottlenecks would choke economic activity.

More Hidden Risks At Banks

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Are American banks making proper disclosures with respect to derivatives and mortgage securities?

The Tax Preparers Who Heart Obamacare

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Will Obamacare make you more reliant on your tax adviser? How might tax advisers be impacted when Obamacare is finally fully implemented?

Oh, Craps. U.S. Homeowners Are Repeating Their Mistakes

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Ignoring the lessons of the recession, Americans still have too much of their net worth tied up in their homes.

At Walmart, the Doctor Is Out

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

After announcing plans in 2007 for 2,000 in-store medical clinics by mid-2012, Walmart is now closing clinic locations faster than it is opening them.

How a Turkish Immigrant Made a Billion Dollars in Eight Years Selling Yogurt

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Chobani dominates the rapidly growing Greek style yogurt segment, but the two big yogurt players, Dannon and Yoplait, are chipping away at their lead. Can Chobani remain independent and in the lead?

The Lies We Tell at Work

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Why is there so much lying at the office?

Small Enough to Fail

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The case of the only bank to be criminally indicted for mortgage fraud raises the question of whether the ends can justify the means.

Quicken's Rapid Rise in the Mortgage Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Quicken’s $25 billion in home loans during the fourth quarter made it the No. 3 lender, but can it hold on as refinancings dry up?

One Way to Fix Broken Roads: Stop Taxing Gas

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Virginia’s Governor Bob McDonnell would like to do away with the gas tax and raise the sales tax instead to fund fixing his states' broken roads.

Gimme Shelter

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Which countries are now the most popular tax havens?

Dealmakers Dream of African Riches

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sub-Saharan Africa's economy is picking up, attracting bankers, private equity investors, and M&A specialists.

Management Secrets from the Meanest Company in America

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

How can the worst company to work for in America be so successful?

Stem Cell Showdown

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

A Texas company wants to move ahead with adult stem cell therapy but has faced impediments from the FDA.

China’s Smartphone Market Welcomes Dumbphones

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China is now the world’s largest smartphone market and home to Lenovo, the world’s biggest PC vendor. In 2013, Lenovo is working to get every phone sale possible. Look out Apple?

Pandora is Boxed in By High Royalty Fees

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Should Pandora pay higher royalty fees than its competitors?

Pushing Banks to Unwind Their Global Bets

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the globalization of financial markets be undone by new rules?

Manufacturing: A Rebound, Not a Renaissance

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

What is the current state of manufacturing in the U.S.?

It's Happy Hour for Jim Beam in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Imported American whiskey is doing well in Russia, while vodka and beer experience a decline.

Aging Boomers are Undermining the Fed

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Record-low interest rates should encourage spending on big-ticket items like houses and cars, but retirees are not behaving like the Fed would hope.

Aging Boomers are Undermining the Fed

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Retirees and near-retirees pinch pennies to make up for lost savings.

Canada's Corn Belt Attracts the Hot Money

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The prairies of western Canada have long been known for wheat. Now as a result of strong global demand (which leads to high prices), a warming climate, and new corn varieties, more corn is being grown on the Canadian prairies.

Volunteerism as a Core Competency

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Many companies support employee volunteerism and sponsor community service projects. The Civic 50, a new scorecard developed by Bloomberg LP and two nonprofits, ranks American companies on their community service efforts.

Volunteerism as a Core Competency

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Many companies are increasing their emphasis on community service programs, and IBM is a leader in these efforts. With volunteer hours equivalent to some 1,600 employees last year, they are at the top of The Civic 50, a new scoreboard for America's community-minded companies.

The War Over Christmas

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Can traditional retailers compete with Amazon.com or other online retailers?

American Express Wants to Be Your Banker

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is American Express becoming a bank? With $37 billion in deposits and a prepaid card deal with Wal-Mart Stores, it could be the bank of the future.

American Express Wants to Be Your Banker

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Is American Express becoming a bank? With $37 billion in deposits and a prepaid card deal with Wal-Mart Stores, it could be the bank of the future.

American Express Wants to Be Your Banker

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Is American Express becoming a bank? With $37 billion in deposits and a prepaid card deal with Wal-Mart Stores, it could be the bank of the future.

Indian Companies Seek A Passage to America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As Americans customers ask their software subcontractors to hire more U.S.-based employees, Indian firms struggle to find enough qualified Americans.

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

AB InBev, while cutting costs and making investors happy, is disappointing some loyal customers.

The U.S. Economy’s Personality Disorder

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

As consumers boost their spending, businesses are fretting and tightening up.

Selling the Supremes On Diversity

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Some of America's largest companies say that having a diverse workforce helps their bottom line, and are sending the Supreme Court that message before its upcoming affirmative action case.

Made in USA Still Sells

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Regardless of the huge U.S. trade deficit, Made in U.S.A. still has great value overseas.

Made in USA Still Sells

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

For products and services linked to positive American attributes (e.g., technology, Hollywood, fast food, etc), American-sounding names help products sell in developing countries.

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

Afraid to Hire

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In a slowly recovering economy, numerous U.S. companies remain hesitant to hire, and some are laying off workers.

Where Pizza Gets Some Latin Spice

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Pizza Patrón’s stores may look more like Mexico than Little Italy. With $42.5 million in sales and a growth rate more than fifteen times that of Pizza Hut, the venture owes a big “gracias” to its Hispanic customers.

Smarter Robots, With No Wage Demands

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

No wage demands and inexpensive? Wow! Let's get more of these new robot employees.

Ronald Reagan and the 47 Percent

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Some Republicans now think that it might be better if fewer workers pay no income tax, since then the workers might have more interest in keeping taxes low. Is this a good idea, and would Ronald Reagan agree with this approach?

Turkey’s TV Housewives Are Desperate, Too

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The success of foreign remakes of popular U.S. television shows suggests that the market for television entertainment is going local.

The Teachers' Last Stand

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Are Chicago's teachers recently on strike the latest evidence of a declining labor union movement in America?

UBS: A Record Whistleblower Payout

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

A record whistleblower payment has been made to a former UBS banker who was jailed for his role in helping Americans evade taxes.

Microsoft’s Frantic Race for Third Place

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

One of the world’s most influential tech companies commands only 4 percent of market share in the smartphone arena? Microsoft hopes to increase that number with the introduction of Windows Phone 8. But is it too late?

The Selling of a Superfruit

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Are superfruits the product of brand strategy or something found growing on a tree?

Asia's Rich Have Trust Issues

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Asia is home to more millionaires than North America, but disillusionment is making it hard for banks to attract Asian wealth management clients.

At Abercrombie & Fitch, Sex No Longer Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Abercrombie & Fitch appears to have lost its retail edge and will close 180 stores through 2015. Does sex no longer sell?

A Cash-Free Caffeine Buzz from Starbucks

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Some of the world's largest retailers are learning a few things about cost reduction from Starbucks.

Wall Street's Leadership Vacuum

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Wall Street has never had a shortage of powerful public leaders, until now. With Jamie Dimon's reputation on the decline, who will step forward to take his place and save the banking industry from a deluge of new regulations?

Wall Street's Leadership Vacuum

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Wall Street has never had a shortage of powerful public leaders, until now. With Jamie Dimon's reputation on the decline, who will step forward to take his place and save the banking industry from a deluge of new regulations?

Wall Street's Leadership Vacuum

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Wall Street has never had a shortage of powerful public leaders, until now. With Jamie Dimon's reputation on the decline, who will step forward to take his place and save the banking industry from a deluge of new regulations?

Unilever Wants to be America's Big Dipper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Unilever hopes to disrupt the U.S. ice cream business with its Magnum bars.

Doing Business With the Frenemy

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S. military has sourced $400 million worth of helicopters from an unlikely source: the same Russian military contractor that is arming the Syrian government.

Chinese Stocks Say Farewell to the U.S.

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

A handfull of debacles has put the breaks on a wave of reverse mergers into the U.S. markets by Chinese companies. Indeed, the trend is in full retreat.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Is it time for a low-cost strategy in the smartphone business? And is a Chinese company best positioned to do that?

In the Condom War, Sex Is Serious Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Durex rules most of the world in the condom business and is now looking to penetrate Trojan's dominant position in the U.S. market.

How Ridiculous Are QR Codes? Scan This One To Find Out

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Another technology bites the dust? QR codes have proven to be largely ineffective as advertising tools, but these data-packed bar codes still have a future.

Europe's Latest Hardliners: German Automakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While French and Italian automakers are feeling the pain of Europe's economic slowdown (and want financial assistance), German automakers that have long emphasized export markets in North America and Asia don't believe they should be asked to help in a bailout.

H-1B Visas Hit the Cap, Sending Companies to Plan B

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Immigration officials rejected 27 percent of the visa requests companies made to transfer employees to the U.S. last year.

H-1B Visas Hit the Cap, Sending Companies to Plan B

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Should operations managers be allowed to hire foreign workers with job skills that enterprises need? Or in this time of high U.S. unemployment, should all jobs be reserved for Americans even if they are less qualified?

When a 95 Percent Cut Doesn't Cut It

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some companies are bemoaning the conditions Congress may put on a proposed tax exemption for 95 percent of their overseas profits.

When a 95 Percent Cut Doesn't Cut It

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Corporate taxes in the U.S. are too high and discourage businesses from setting up shop on U.S. soil.

An American Idol for Entrepreneurs

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Dave McClure has used his $30 million fund to invest in 300 startups around the world. Now he

Fares for Summer Travel Rise

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Operations managers might want to sponsor less air travel.

Supercar Makers Seek a Different Shade of Green

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

If you'rr interested in buying a hybrid, why not go for a $850,000 Ferrari with a 900 horsepower engine? (Sorry, Ford or GM don't sell a similar car.)

ExxonMobil vs. Dodd-Frank

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is big oil doing battling Dodd-Frank?

Hotels Are Hiring as Americans Hit the Road

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Hey! Look at who is hiring now. Operations managers, should you be doing likewise?

Over a Barrel

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A minor oil spill off the coast of Brazil has turned into a financial and public relations nightmare for Chevron Corporation.

Over a Barrel

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Although Chevron handled a relatively small oil spill according to industry standards, Brazil is relentlessly prosecuting the company.

China's Soccer Moms Want SUVs, Too

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Growing middle-class prosperity in China is making SUVs an important segment for automakers.

Corporate Flight From a Bill Mill

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

After private ALEC documents were posted online, prominent companies decided to leave the group.

The Stuck-in-the-Middle Recovery

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is the middle class being left behind in the economy's recovery?

A Tax Windfall from the Housing Bust

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Perhaps you have heard of unintended consequences. Such is the case for a tax revenue windfall resulting for the housing crisis.

Google Sees the Future, and It's in Kansas City

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Google Fiber. Will the Internet giant really consider moving into high-speed Internet?

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China shifts its export focus from shoes and t-shirts to heavy industry.

The End is Coming January 1, 2013

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the U.S. Congress allow automatic cuts in spending to occur?

KFC's Big Game of Chicken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

KFC is growing quickly in emerging markets, but in the United States, franchisees are not happy with the attention they receive.

In the Race for the Car-less, Can Hertz Outrun Zipcar?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

After allowing Zipcar to develop a dominant position in a now sizable car-sharing industry, Hertz has decided to go big and pit its entire fleet against them. Can Hertz gain traction in this unique segment and do it without cannibalizing their existing business?

A Mega-Millionaire's Crusade Against Taxes

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Want to change the world? How about just the income tax code? Thinking of running for Congress someday? There may be a simpler and more effective approach.

Take Two Years and Call Me in the Morning

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Obamacare has already arrived. What does it mean for operations managers?

The Legal Madness Around NCAA Bets

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The laws around March Madness pools are complex, and they

Outsourcing: A Passage Out of India

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As U.S. corporations outsource more skilled white-collar jobs, they increasingly are looking beyond India to closer places with well-educated labor pools.

It's Not Paranoia if They're Stealing Your Secrets

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

There is growing evidence of intellectual property theft in China.

Speed Dial: Tyra Banks

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

The creator of America's Next Top Model talks about what she learned at a Harvard Business School executive program she finished on Feb. 17.

Mitt Romney's Box of Kryptonite

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Does the economics of creative destruction work?

Is Any CEO Worth $189,000 Per Hour?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How would you like to earn $189,000 an hour?

Food's Great. But Does the Chef Get Vacation?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

A new guide rates restaurants on how they treat employees. Why should diners care?

Go North to the DMZ, Young Man

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

North Korea is now attracting foreign companies that have a tolerance for risk and government meddling and China is leading the pack. What are the risks and rewards of marketing north of the DMZ and why are companies acting so quickly?

The U.S. Goes After Bribery, On a Budget

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

To avoid prosecution, high fines, and loss of potential business, some corporations agree to pay to investigate themselves.

The Man Who Bought North Dakota

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Wildcatter Harold Hamm became the biggest winner in the biggest American oil find since Prudhoe Bay by investing early and sticking with it.

Are E-Cigs Cool?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The sale of E-cigs continue to increase as they battle the FDA, the American Cancer Society and Big Tobacco

Wendy's Goes Beyond the Dollar Menu in Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To lure trendy diners in Japan, Wendy's has introduced a $16 burger topped with truffles and foie gras.

On Top of the World - And Out $43 Billion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The economic slowdown in the West has left ArcelorMittal with high debt and over capacity.

Do You Want This Job?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

In the wake of an immigrant exodus, Alabama has jobs. Why don't Americans want them?

Do You Want This Job?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In the wake of an illegal immigrant exodus, Alabama has jobs available. Trouble is, many Americans don't want them - the pay is too low, and the work is too hard. What should be done?

An American Rebel Roils Ethical Commerce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Different groups debate over what are the requirements for a fair trade label.

Would You Buy $1 Billion in China-Made, So-Controversial-It-Hurts, Telecom Equipment From This Guy?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei makes inexpensive switches and telecom equipment worldwide, but has had a hard time overcoming mistrust by the United States' government.

Marx to Market

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The economic crisis has made the philosopher

Canada and the U.S. Try to Cuddle Up Again

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Reforms spelled out in a joint plan signed by Obama and Harper could give a boost to trade slowed by post-Sept. 11 border tightening.

Too BofA to Fail

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Bank of America's CEO holds the fate of the U.S.'s largest bank

Too BofA to Fail

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bank of America's CEO holds the fate of the U.S.'s largest bank

Too BofA to Fail

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bank of America's CEO holds the fate of the U.S.'s largest bank

Kodak Tries to Bring Its Digital Revival Into Focus

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Kodak's film business is in terminal decline. Whether Kodak can retool itself for the digital age remains to be seen.

Zara Plays Catch-Up with Online Shoppers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Spain-based Inditex is counting on online sales rather than new store openings to power sales growth in the U.S.

The Slow Disappearance of the American Working Man

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will our labor markets ever be the same again?

The Slow Disappearance of the American Working Man

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Let's face it, women are pushing men aside in the quest for jobs. A smaller share of men have jobs today than at any time since World War II.

The Slow Disappearance of the American Working Man

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Employment among American males is falling dangerously low. Identifying and resolving the issues underlying this problem is critical to maintaining American competitiveness.

Liquefied Natural Gas: Target Asia

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

North American natural gas prices are half what they were in 2008. A boom in LNG exports could change that.

Brian Moynihan’s Credibility Crunch

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Bank of America has the lowest price-to-book ratio of any of the large banks. The reason? Uncertainty due to mortgages originated by their Countrywide unit generated years ago.

Beyond Five Guys' Beloved Burgers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Carnivores keep coming back for the authentic vibe as much as the beef but maintaining it throughout the franchise is no simple task, and In-N-Out Burger is a strong competitor.

O.K., Smart Guys: Fix the Energy Problem

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

How should the United States solve its energy problems? The experts brainstorm. Can operations managers benefit?

Can African Farmers Learn to Thrive?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Efforts to boost the productivity of, and payments to, small farmers in Africa could help alleviate poverty but hurt rich U.S. producers who rely on government farm subsidies.

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

The Really Long Arm of American Justice

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

After losing a huge case in Ecuador, Chevron asks a United States judge to rule that it does not have to pay.

Nafta's Rolling Thunder

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A welcome end to the U.S.-Mexico trucking dispute - how can operations managers take advantage of it?

She's with the Government, and She's Here to Help

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Banks don't trust her. Republicans won't confirm her. Yet she's already won her battle to remake how America borrows. How did Elizabeth Warren almost single-handedly create the CFPB?

She's with the Government, and She's Here to Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Banks don't trust her. Republicans won't confirm her. Yet she's already won her battle to remake how America borrows. How did Elizabeth Warren almost single-handedly create the CFPB?

She's with the Government, and She's Here to Help

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Banks don't trust her. Republicans won't confirm her. Yet she's already won her battle to remake how America borrows. How did Elizabeth Warren almost single-handedly create the CFPB?

Grumpy Old Car Guys

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Bob Lutz, the flamboyant auto executive, has just released a new book blasting the bean counters. He blames their tightfisted analytics for stifling creativity and resulting in the death of the GM. But wait, Ford survived by diligent adherence to strong financial principles at the same time Lutz was steering GM into bankruptcy.

Does Government Matter?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some say that government is part of the problem and also part of the solution. If so, where is its sweet spot? Or is the economy pretty much on its own?

How to Save Greece

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will it take to save Greece?

Rats! Why Bond Investors Fall for the Same Old Trick

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Bond investors follow interest rates as predictors of financial crises, but it turns out they're a poor indicator.

Rats! Why Bond Investors Fall for the Same Old Trick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bond investors follow interest rates as predictors of financial crises, but it turns out they're a poor indicator.

Rats! Why Bond Investors Fall for the Same Old Trick

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bond investors follow interest rates as predictors of financial crises, but it turns out they're a poor indicator.

Grateful to be Employed, Bored Half to Death

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

If President Obama wants to keep his job, Americans may first have to feel more confident about quitting theirs. What does this mean for operations managers?

The Incredible Shrinking Financial Sector

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Bank of America, Citigroup, and other big banks are stymied by a sluggish economy, low interest rates, and new regulations. How will the shrinking financial sector deal with the future?

The Incredible Shrinking Financial Sector

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bank of America, Citigroup, and other big banks are stymied by a sluggish economy, low interest rates, and new regulations. How will the shrinking financial sector deal with the future?

The Incredible Shrinking Financial Sector

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bank of America, Citigroup, and other big banks are stymied by a sluggish economy, low interest rates, and new regulations. How will the shrinking financial sector deal with the future?

Millionaire Taxes Are Falling out of Vogue

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Many states that were once discussing instituting so-called

A Fight Over Finger-Friendly Table Saws

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Tool companies choose not to use technology that could prevent many injuries from saws. When should safety trump price?

9 Ideas From Around the World to Fix the U.S. Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do to get the U.S. economy going again? Countries as diverse as Germany, Brazil, Singapore, and Thailand can offer ways for the U.S. to shore up its economy.

Despite Losses, Tesco's Still California Dreamin'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The British retailer's U.S. food chain, Fresh & Easy, is having trouble getting its formula right on the West Coast.

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

VW is spending $1 billion on a Tennessee factory to boost market share in the U.S. Could it eventually become the No. 1 global carmaker?

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

VW is spending $1 billion on a new factory in Tennessee under the theory that you can't be the number one auto company in the world if you are not successful in the United States.

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

VW is spending $1 billion on a Tennessee factory to boost market share in the U.S. and eventually become the No. 1 global carmaker.

No Tax Break Too Small

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As negotiations over trillions of dollars in federal budget cuts ramp up, lobbyists are out to protect their clients' interests

Need a Towel Ring? Better Try China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's getting harder to find U.S.-made products in many categories.

A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Higher wages in China and smarter factories in the U.S. may boost American manufacturing - if U.S. unions and big government don't get in the way.

Pinkberry Looks Abroad to Keep Its Cool

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The hip frozen yogurt chain, still tiny at home, is heading overseas.

Playing Chicken with the Debt

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Should we increase the debt limit?

Are Social Networks Gonna Blow?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Tech bubbles happen, but we usually gain from the innovation left behind. This one

Are Social Networks Gonna Blow?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tech bubbles happen, but we usually gain from the innovation left behind. This one

Are Social Networks Gonna Blow?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Tech bubbles happen, but we usually gain from the innovation left behind. This one

Innovator: Jennifer Pahlka

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

The founder of Code for America is bringing programmers and cash-strapped cities together to give government services a boost.

The YouTube of China Goes Legit

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Youku faces tough competition and scrutiny from Beijing as it moves toward showing more original content on its site.

What's Good for AT&T is Good for (America) AT&T

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

To get merger approvals from Washington, telcos promise big infrastructure investments. Data show they often don't come true.

Wal-Mart Faces the Big Box of Class Actions

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A Supreme Court review of a massive gender discrimination suit against Wal-Mart could usher in new rules regarding class actions.

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

Pandit Stakes Citi's Future on Emerging Markets

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Having recovered from the financial crisis, Citigroup now earns more than half its profits in emerging markets.

For Obama, High Oil Prices Have a Green Lining

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Obama's plans for electric vehicles, clean fuel, and high-speed rail could get a boost Unfortunately, operations managers could still pay a price for going green.

Crisis in Japan: The Impact on American Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nearly three dozen U.S. corporations derive at least 15 percent of their sales from the Japanese market.

For Central Banks, a Chance to Get it Wrong

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Economists are picking up early signs of a 1994-style bond rout in the actions of central banks. If they're right, watch out.

For Central Banks, a Chance to Get it Wrong

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Economists are picking up early signs of a 1994-style bond rout in the actions of central banks. If they're right, watch out.

For Central Banks, a Chance to Get it Wrong

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Economists are picking up early signs of a 1994-style bond rout in the actions of central banks. If they're right, watch out.

The Bull Whisperer

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Sallie Krawcheck, chief of the wealth management unit at Bank of America, needs her Merrill Lynch brokers to drive profit to other divisions. And Merrill's Thundering Herd is snorting mad about it. Should BofA be broken up?

The Bull Whisperer

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sallie Krawcheck, chief of the wealth management unit at Bank of America, needs her Merrill Lynch brokers to drive profit to other divisions. And Merrill's Thundering Herd is snorting mad about it. Should BofA be broken up?

The Bull Whisperer

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Sallie Krawcheck, chief of the wealth management unit at Bank of America, needs her Merrill Lynch brokers to drive profit to other divisions. And Merrill's Thundering Herd is snorting mad about it. Should BofA be broken up?

USA Inc.: Red, White, and Very Blue

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Mary Meeker says that if the U.S. were a corporation, it would be sick

USA Inc.: Red, White, and Very Blue

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mary Meeker says that if the U.S. were a corporation, it would be sick

USA Inc.: Red, White, and Very Blue

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Mary Meeker says that if the U.S. were a corporation, it would be sick

Stars and Stripes and Servers Forever

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Startup SeaMicro says it can compete with bigger rivals by selling efficient, low-power, made-in-America servers geared for Web work.

Did the Continental Drift Create an Oil Bonanza?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

A bet that a vast oil field lies off the coast of French Guiana may prove a geological theory and pay off big for Tullow Oil and its partners.

Defense Contractors Brace for the Big Squeeze

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The industry comes under pressure as Congress understandably focuses on reducing the national budget deficit. What can operations managers learn from this?

The Operators

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Can private equity beat the market again? Mega-shop TPG makes a $48 billion bet that the answer is yes.

The Operators

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can private equity beat the market again? Mega-shop TPG makes a $48 billion bet that the answer is yes.

The Operators

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can private equity beat the market again? Mega-shop TPG makes a $48 billion bet that the answer is yes.

Hungry for a Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can a rainy spring in Saskatchewan contribute to the overthrow of a government in Tunisia?

Taxation without Complication

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is it time for real tax reform in America?

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As U.S. electricity producers shift away from coal, coal producers are seeking export markets where there is less concern over carbon dioxide emissions.

The Regulator: Why Business Loves Rules (Really)

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

From corn to chemicals, many industries are thriving under Obama's reign of rulemaking.

The Essence of Apple

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will happen to Apple after Steve Jobs leaves?

Corporate Taxes: The Multinational Advantage

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Are U.S. corporate tax rates so high as to be an impediment to global competitiveness? That has been the claim for decades, however, this article raises an interesting point.

You Will Regret This Investment

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

You Will Regret This Investment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

You Will Regret This Investment

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

Universal Casts Its Vote on American Idol

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How does Universal Music Group plan to restore American Idol

Back to the Economic Future

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is there a future for macroeconomics?

A CEO's Dilemma: When Is It Safe to Hire Again?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

CEOs don't want to increase employment until they know the recovery is real, but it won't be until they hire.

Food: Freaky Weather, Scary Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While food may be consumed locally, it is grown worldwide. The price of groceries in the U.S. is directly impacted by the weather in Argentina, Russia, Australia and everywhere else in the world.

Facebook's Initial Private Offering

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How many billions is Facebook worth on the market?

A Global Scare in Food Prices

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With drought and flood hurting harvests - and population growth increasing demand - some forecasters see significant food price increases in 2011.

Up in the Air: Will Richard Branson's Virgin America Fly?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The fun carrier has shown promise, but Virgin is at a turning point, and its future is far from certain.

The Health-Care Act on Trial

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is in store for the health-care act?

OMG! It's a Text From Granny

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

As growth in voice revenue slows, telecommunications carriers are pushing data services such as texting. Wireless operators see opportunity in older demographics because relatively few send texts.

Will Video Kill the Internet, Too?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Internet traffic is expected to triple by 2014. By then, more than 90 percent of the traffic may be video.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The Filipino workforce, well trained in English, is luring call center operations from Bangalore and Gurgaon. Cost-conscious operations managers should take note.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the call center business, the Philippines studied India's success and has now overtaken it in revenue.

Shoppers, Start Your Engines

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will holiday spending jump-start the economy?

How Kia Is Rapping Its Way into America's Heart

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Korean automaker is luring more drivers with low prices and edgy ads.

Campbell's Quest for Productivity

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Corporate America is turning out decent profits despite the recession by wringing more efficiency out of operations rather than hiring more employees.

Wal-Mart vs. a Million Angry Women

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The giant retailer wants the Supreme Court to block a huge gender-bias suit. Why? Should the Court agree to do so?

These Scissors Won't Cut

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How do we control the budget deficit?

These Scissors Won't Cut

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Can the U.S. avoid following Greece, Ireland, and Iceland into the credit abyss?

These Scissors Won't Cut

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can the U.S. avoid following Greece, Ireland, and Iceland into the credit abyss?

These Scissors Won't Cut

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the U.S. avoid following Greece, Ireland, and Iceland into the credit abyss?

Cotton Is King Again, Especially in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese apparel producers are being squeezed by cotton shortages, which will lead to higher clothing prices in U.S. stores.

With Late Picasso, Size Matters

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Picasso's 1960-73 works were considered vulgar and/or incoherent, but not by newly wealthy Chinese collectors.

To Create Jobs, Help Existing Small Employers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Small businesses are the principal U.S. hiring engine. However, young small businesses hire fewer workers than their more mature counterparts.

Fixing American Finance

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S. financial system is erratic and voracious, and keeps score in milliseconds. Here's how to rein in the beast.

Fixing American Finance

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The U.S. financial system is erratic and voracious, and keeps score in milliseconds. Here's how to rein in the beast.

Fixing American Finance

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The U.S. financial system is erratic and voracious, and keeps score in milliseconds. Here's how to rein in the beast.

Small Fish Devouring Other Small Fish

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Emerging-market telecoms are driving the latest round of buyouts.

Online Colleges Target Benefit-Rich Vets

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Veterans with GI Bill benefits are again helping universities as well as themselves. This time it's online institutions that are reaching out to enroll the vets.

Mobile Apps Suit Up for the Office

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

By 2015 about half of all devices on U.S. corporate networks will be mobile. The shift away from PCs means a large increase in the North American market for office apps.

India Outsourcers Feel Unloved in the U.S.

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A ban on offshoring Ohio government IT projects feels like the thin edge of the wedge in Bangalore. Is Ohio being stupid?

Coke's Last Round

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The developed world can't drink any more Coke, and India and China are saturated with competitors. That leaves Africa as the last great growth opportunity for Coke.

Coke's Last Round

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sales are flat in developed countries. For Coke to keep growing, Africa is it.

Banks Face a Decade of Slow Revenue Growth

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why is the outlook for bank earnings over the next decade so bleak?

The Inequality Delusion

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How is wealth distributed in America?

Shredding the Dream

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The foreclosure crisis isn't just about lost documents. It's about trust and a clash over who gets stuck with $1.1 trillion in losses.

Shredding the Dream

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The foreclosure crisis isn't just about lost documents. It's about trust and a clash over who gets stuck with $1.1 trillion in losses.

Shredding the Dream

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The foreclosure crisis isn't just about lost documents. It's about trust and a clash over who gets stuck with $1.1 trillion in losses.

Made in China

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Meet the Chinese tilapia, a bland food product that grows fast and sells cheap. Environmentalists hate it, but Americans keep ordering more.

Made in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The Chinese tilapia is a bland-tasting fish that grows fast, sells cheap, and has environmentalists up in arms. U.S. fish farmers aren't happy either.

Immigrants in the West Aren't Going Away

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Despite a surge of anti-immigrant feeling in some countries, most have stayed put. How can employers use them within the law?

Pandora's Next Frontier: Your Wheels

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

The leader in Web radio is stepping up its efforts to reach commuters.

The United States of Tariffs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. has used tariffs for more than two centuries to raise revenue and protect American industry. Will this work again in an era of diminished American power?

Trying to Starve Obamacare

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The House Republican plan to deny funds to Obama's health-care overhaul is difficult and risky but could be politically and fiscally warranted.

Shred the Debt

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is it time for debt writedowns?

On the Yuan, Be Careful What You Wish For

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is the real value of the Chinese yuan?

Bootstrapping Profits by Opening the Books

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Financial transparency and giving workers a direct stake in a company's success can boost motivation and earnings, says Jody Heymann

The Fallen King of Finland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nokia's decline in the market may be linked to its isolated geographic base.

Markets & Finance

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Signs of nervousness about stocks are convincing contrarian investors that this is a smart time to put money into the market. Wall Street banks still don't divulge much about their trading, making it hard for investors to know how much risk the firms are taking. Right now, you can buy dominant, globally competitive, well-capitalized businesses at absolutely cheap valuations.

Markets & Finance

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Signs of nervousness about stocks are convincing contrarian investors that this is a smart time to put money into the market. Wall Street banks still don't divulge much about their trading, making it hard for investors to know how much risk the firms are taking. Right now, you can buy dominant, globally competitive, well-capitalized businesses at absolutely cheap valuations.

Markets & Finance

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Signs of nervousness about stocks are convincing contrarian investors that this is a smart time to put money into the market. Wall Street banks still don't divulge much about their trading, making it hard for investors to know how much risk the firms are taking. Right now, you can buy dominant, globally competitive, well-capitalized businesses at absolutely cheap valuations.

How to Fix the Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the U.S. economy be fixed?

Fantasy Football: The New Internet Porn

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Fantasy football has become, for better or worse, an Internet addiction for a generation of upwardly mobile, white-collar professionals

British Airways Seeks a Bride to Regain Altitude

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

After taking on its unions, the airline needs a global partner to grow

A Whopper of a Challenge for Burger King's Buyers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Burger King was recently acquired for $4 billion. The challenges of turning the company around are so vast that one is forced to wonder: why?

Japan's Mizuno Swings for the Fences

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's top baseball brand is aiming for the U.S. market

After a Jam, Lexmark Turns to Services

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The printer maker helps others save money by printing less

The Secret Cult of Office Smokers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Often ostracized by their peers, smokers are taking advantage of their time together outside to get work done.

Tracking Stimulus Scamsters in Real Time

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The White House is using technology to track stimulus spending and catch fraud before it happens.

Tracking Stimulus Scamsters in Real Time

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

It's important to minimize corruption in order to maintain public acceptability of highly deficitary federal government stimulus spending.

The World's Most Caffeinated Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Coffee consumption and economic growth appear to be linked.

The Wailing Wall

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How do we fix the labor market in the U.S.?

The Wailing Wall

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Illegal immigration to the U.S. remains high. Some want to continue to tolerate it, but business wants it fixed.

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

Let's Have a Beer and Talk Derivatives

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Do end-users of derivatives deserve to be subjected to the regulations on derivatives that are being proposed by the Obama administration? Large brewers like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch say no, and they are taking their case to Washington

A Gold Rush in Green Technology

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some IPOS from clean energy companies are coming, at least as long as their government subsidies last

Why the Obama Plan Is Working

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A Bloomberg national poll in March found that Americans, by an almost 2-to-1 margin, believe the economy has gotten worse rather than better during the past year. The market begs to differ.

Why the Obama Plan Is Working

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A Bloomberg national poll in March found that Americans, by an almost 2-to-1 margin, believe the economy has gotten worse rather than better during the past year. The market begs to differ.

Why the Obama Plan Is Working

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

A Bloomberg national poll in March found that Americans, by an almost 2-to-1 margin, believe the economy has gotten worse rather than better during the past year. The market begs to differ.

The Case for More Stimulus

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Should the Fed give the economy more stimulus?

Closing for Business?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Western companies compete in Beijing?

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Brazil is emerging as a key battleground for the hearts, minds, and wallets of Latin America's middle class.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and local rival Companhia Brasileira de Distribuic

Putting the Pedal to the Metal

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Major cost-cutting and expansion programs strained the automaker. Are they the cause of Toyota's troubles?

Invasion of the Guatemalan Chicken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chicken chain Pollo Campero established a niche with immigrants in the U.S. Now it is hungry for more

Greece's Weakness is its Strength

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the EU support Greece's bailout?

Brownnosing for Google Broadband

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

If American Internet service gets faster, people will likely spend more time online watching videos and playing games, providing Google fresh ways to expand its advertising business

Doctor, There's a Pulse

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What's next for AIG, the insurance and financial services company that almost collapsed itself, and the U.S. economy, in 2008?

A Choir Boy Battles Wall Street

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Richard Cordray may not look the part, but the Ohio attorney general has assumed the pit bull role once played by Eliot Spitzer and Rudy Giuliani

Deadly Business in Moscow

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Corruption has its price. In Russia, it limits the country

Goodbye, Ireland

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some 170,000 Irish jobs vanished last year, and the lack of employment may be driving a generation away from the country.

Detroit's Big Chance

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

GM, Ford, and other competitors have an opportunity to steal buyers from a bloodied Toyota. The trick is not to seem predatory. Really? Who's kidding who?

A Caribbean Tax Holiday

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How can $100 billion a year in credit-card receipts escape U.S. sales and income taxes? By being processed in locales like Aruba and St. Kitts with the help of an international payment processor.

A Caribbean Tax Holiday

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How can $100 billion a year in credit-card receipts escape U.S. sales and income taxes? By being processed in locales like Aruba and St. Kitts with the help of an international payment processor.

A Caribbean Tax Holiday

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How can $100 billion a year in credit-card receipts escape U.S. sales and income taxes? By being processed in locales like Aruba and St. Kitts with the help of an international payment processor.

Greenhouse Gas Cuts, One Way or Another

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Global warming skeptics beware, the EPA has regulations due at the end of March

Sony and Samsung's Strategic Split

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While Sony bets on outsourcing TVs, Samsung is building an edge by making its own.

Five Ways the 'iPad' May Change the World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

The iPad is on the way, and it just might reduce calling costs, cut your commute, and, to the delight of journalists everywhere, pull print media back from the brink.

The Return of the Outsourced Job

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To boost employment, local governments are wooing Indian companies such as Tata, Wipro, and Infosys.

Still Wanted: Foreign Talent—and Visas

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Despite the U.S. jobless rate of 10%, hiring of workers from abroad continues. It may be necessary in order to find skills not available through the U.S. educational system.

Consumers Are Opening Their Wallets Again

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will consumer spending rescue the recovery?

Getting to the Bottom of Plastic Bottle Risks

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Retailers are demanding vigilance against worrisome chemicals in containers, food, and other goods.

Behind the Great Stock Rally of 2009

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the stock market rally continue into 2010?

Why Drugmakers Don't Twitter

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

The FDA has so far failed to craft rules clarifying how pharmaceutical companies can participate in online discussions.

Wall Street vs. America

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Taxpayers are taking another hit as strapped local governments fork over billions in fees on investments gone bad while Wall Street cashes in with another year of record bonuses.

Wall Street vs. America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Taxpayers are taking another hit as strapped local governments fork over billions in fees on investments gone bad while Wall Street cashes in with another year of record bonuses.

Wall Street vs. America

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Taxpayers are taking another hit as strapped local governments fork over billions in fees on investments gone bad while Wall Street cashes in with another year of record bonuses.

Toyota Gets Stuck in a Pair of Ruts

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With a strengthening yen eating into its profits, where is Toyota headed?

These Men Could Kill SarbOx

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Lawyers are pressing a case that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act is flawed and may be unconstitutional. The case will be heard in early December by the Supreme Court.

Healing Chile's Malaise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite decades of economic growth, average citizens are dissatisfied; they want better schools and more opportunities.

Healing Chile's Malaise

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Chile's economy has become the envy of Latin America over the last two decades. But for many the benefits of that wealth remain out of reach.

Jobs Now, Deficit Reduction Later

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. economy still needs fiscal stimulus: Attack the debt once demand returns, says one analyst, a former high-level Clinton appointee.

An Emissions Tariff: Who Would Get Hurt

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The measure, now in the Senate, is aimed chiefly at carbon-intensive products from China and India. But would it spark a trade war? That's just what U.S. exporters don't need.

What Happens if the Dollar Crashes?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Are we ready for a dollar bust? Could the dollar fall by 25% or more? Are we on the verge of soaring inflation and global trade wars? Some experts think it could happen.

What Happens if the Dollar Crashes?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Are we ready for a dollar bust? Could the dollar fall by 25% or more? Are we on the verge of soaring inflation and global trade wars? Some experts think it could happen.

What Happens if the Dollar Crashes?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Are we ready for a dollar bust? Could the dollar fall by 25% or more? Are we on the verge of soaring inflation and global trade wars? Some experts think it could happen.

What Happens if the Dollar Crashes

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Would there be trade wars if the dollar crashes?

Twisting the Arms of the Uninsured

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Experts say the only way to cover the uninsured is to require them to buy insurance or pay a fine. But how much should the penalty for failing to have coverage be?

Betting Big on a Boom in Natural Gas

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With prices low and the promise of vast new supplies, some businesses are making the switch from oil-based fuels and coal. Are they making the right call?

Renewable Energy is Still Struggling to Gain Ground

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Why are renewables failing to increase their energy market share?

America's High-Tech Sweatshops

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

U.S. companies may be contributing unwittingly to the exploitation of workers imported from India and elsewhere by tech-services outfits.

Carbon Curbs: It's Business vs. Business

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Why are powerful corporate groups taking different sides on proposed legislation that would cap carbon emissions?

Union Leader Andy Stern on the Future of Big Labor

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Maria Bartiromo talks to SEIU head Andy Stern about health-care reform, President Obama, and a labor movement in need of change, and gets some far-ranging answers.

How the Global Economy Is Rebalancing

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the economies of Asia, the Americas, and Europe revive together?

CDHPs and HSAs Will Heal Health Care (online only)

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some say that consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) and health savings accounts (HSAs) are the future of health care in the U.S.

Glock's Profit Machine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Glock, an Austrian handgun manufacturer, has found the U.S. to be a very attractive market.

Can the Future be Built in America?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The manufacturing exodus from the U.S. is accelerating, but smarter tax policies, low-cost loans, and industrial zones may help keep factories at home.

Can the Future be Built in America?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

High-tech manufacturing is increasingly moving out of the United States. This has led to calls for an industrial policy to stem the migration.

Turning on the Corporate Tap

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Companies that cut off capital spending outlays are starting to spend again. Will that help spur a global recovery?

Turning on the Corporate Tap

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Companies that cut off capital spending outlays are starting to spend again. Will that help spur a global recovery?

Turning on the Corporate Tap

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Companies that cut off capital spending outlays are starting to spend again. Will that help spur a global recovery?

The Budding Recovery Has Staying Power

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Recent business austerity is boosting profits and the need to expand, and rising global growth is lifting exports, all while public policy efforts continue to support demand by running massive deficits.

America's Fickle Small-Car Market

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Nine new small cars are rolling out in the next 18 months, including six from GM and Ford. Will they sell in the U.S. without the incentives of high gas prices and federal subsidies?

America’s Fickle Small-Car Market

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Americans may be willing to buy small cars if the subsidy is large enough. However, that desire evaporates if gas prices decline and the subsidy disappears.

Consumers Need a Credit Watchdog

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

President Obama's proposed Consumer Financial Protection Agency would make loan contracts clearer and simplify regulation.

The Energy Bill's Thick Haze

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The cost estimates, some biased, vary wildly. But without critical details about alternative energies, offsets, and new technology, it's hard to say. And does anyone know a government program that costs no more than promised? So what should the Senate do?

A Mad Rush to Health Reform

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The proposed law making its way through Congress fails to answer hard, real-life questions about health-care reform's cost and care. And we've just been told that Medicare is going broke.

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Startup Zeebo is betting the growing middle class in emerging markets will take to its affordable console.

Reform and Jobs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Could health-care reform actually spur employment? Two new studies say that it would.

Diageo Tries to Bring Cocktail Time Home

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Can Diageo make homemade cocktails cool again?

Beijing Bolsters the Barriers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite appeals to the WTO, there's not much the U.S. can do about China's protectionist policies.

A Magic Moment for Ford of Europe

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Ford has introduced new cars in Europe just in time to cash in on the EU's cash-for-clunkers program. It remains to be seen whether Ford can maintain its momentum.

Dear Graduate (Crisis Version)

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Want some advice for finding a job during a difficult time? This article offers some good suggestions. Of course, another approach is to study a field that is still hiring, like accounting.

Bitter Medicine for the AMA

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Obama's plan will lower specialists' pay and help primary-care doctors, could save billions, and might please many voters. Will it dampen interest in medical careers, or simply change which careers are favored?

China's Eroding Advantage

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A new study says rising wages in China and higher shipping costs make Mexico a better choice for manufacturing even before country political risk is considered.

Cutting Salaries Instead of Jobs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Companies usually avoid reducing base pay for fear of demoralizing staff and undermining productivity. But not in this downturn. Are they making the correct call?

China's Doubts about the Dollar

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will U.S. deficits do to the value of the dollar?

Productivity's up, and That's a Worry

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What has happened to American productivity?

How not to Sweat the Retail Details

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A Hong Kong-based sourcer is handling factory contracting for more and more U.S. brands that discover it can do the job better. But will political problems arise?

Behind Mittal's Wrenching Cuts

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As it forces the steel industry to idle plants worldwide, ArcelorMittal is streamlining itself for the future. Is it setting a good example for other producers?

The Overseas Tax Squeeze

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do about corporate overseas profits?

The Overseas Tax Squeeze

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Obama's plan to bring home more tax revenue from multinationals is more complex than meets the eye. It may hurt U.S.-based multinationals while aiding their overseas competitors.

Good Times for Cheap Cell Phones

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The rise of ZTE in the cell-phone industry

The Sudden Chill at an Indian Hotspot

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Gurgaon, a suburb of Delhi, is suffering from a wave of layoffs as Western companies retrench.

Cuba: How to Boost Trade

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

President Obama can increase trade with Cuba without convincing Congress to lift the embargo

Clearing the Track for High-Speed Rail

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

By committing $13 billion to high-speed train travel, the Obama Administration is giving long-dormant projects a boost. It's about time, some say.

Blowing Up Pepsi

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Will rebranding at PepsiCo restore growth in mature and declining markets?

The Payoff from Targeting Hispanics

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Getting more bang for marketing expenditure.

Business Is Standing Its Ground

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Ignoring the drug wars, multinationals are pumping in billions to set up or expand their Mexican factories

The Online TV Threat has Cable Scrambling

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Steve B. Burke, the president and chief operating officer of Comcast, America's largest cable distributor, is worried about the rush of consumers going to online movie and video sites.

GM: Who's in Charge Here?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The new CEO knows every facet of the company, but the feds will be breathing down his neck. Who knows best? What will the UAW do?

A Bid to Reconnect With America

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Can Nokia get Americans excited about its products?

A Bid to Reconnect With America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nokia gets rave reviews around the world, and its global market share is increasing. Now it's out to boost its low U.S. market share.

The BusinessWeek 50

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The 13th annual ranking of top-performing companies in America shows that innovation remains a powerful engine of success. Are there investment opportunities here that you're missing?

The BusinessWeek 50

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The 13th annual ranking of top-performing companies in America shows that innovation remains a powerful engine of success. Are there investment opportunities here that you're missing?

The BusinessWeek 50

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The 13th annual ranking of top-performing companies in America shows that innovation remains a powerful engine of success. Are there investment opportunities here that you're missing?

The Krisis in Russia's Industrial Heartland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tensions rise as once-booming Yaroslavl and other factory cities come to a screeching halt.

A Narrowing Window for Foreign Workers?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Why is curbing potential abuses of H-1B visa programs important for U.S. companies and the economy?

A Narrowing Window for Foreign Workers?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

There continue to be accusations of fraud and abuse in the H1-B program in the form of overuse by outsourcing firms and lowering American wages.

Discover: Credit Where Credit Is Due

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Long derided as second-rate, the card issuer is gaining on competitors during the downturn.

Debt Is Hobbling Europe Inc.

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A slew of loans are coming due this year, and banks aren't lending. The world may soon feel the effects.

Can This New 401(k) Save Retirement?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

It's clear that 401(k)s in their current state can't provide a secure retirement for most Americans. Can adding guaranteed lifetime income to a 401(k) be the answer?

Can This New 401(k) Save Retirement?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's clear that 401(k)s in their current state can't provide a secure retirement for most Americans. Can adding guaranteed lifetime income to a 401(k) be the answer?

Can This New 401(k) Save Retirement?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

It's clear that 401(k)s in their current state can't provide a secure retirement for most Americans. Can adding guaranteed lifetime income to a 401(k) be the answer?

The Lawyers Are Massing

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Lenders, accounting firms, and rating agencies face civil, and possibly criminal, liability from the subprime lending debacle.

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

Trade: Hawks Will Square Off against Retailers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

America's trade deficit with China was a contentious campaign issue. Lowering the trade deficit will be a difficult task for the incoming administration.

Is Silicon Valley Losing its Magic?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Silicon Valley still deliver financing and innovation?

A Hundred Factories Too Many

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The current economic slowdown has brought into sharp relief the auto industry's huge global over capacity. Global capacity is 94 million vehicles while demand is only 60 million.

Obama's Action Plan

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The president-elect's moves will profoundly affect every market and industry. Here's what operators can expect.

Chipmakers on the Edge

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Awash in inventory, global semiconductor companies are in deep trouble, and some are seeking bailouts.

The Great American Shopper Hits a Wall

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens when consumers don't spend?

Even Toyota's got the Blues

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Overexpansion and plunging sales in North America have brought losses and deep discounts to Toyota Motor Car Company.

Even Toyota's got the Blues

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Toyota woos consumers with profit-erasing incentives.

What's Driving Up the Dollar

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Fear, foreign economic pressures, and fund redemptions are all pushing up the value of the dollar.

What Have You Done to My Company?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What have private equity firms done to their acquisitions?

China's Consumers: Too Scared to Spend

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Instead of sustaining global growth, as the world hoped, China's new middle class is hunkering down.

The Taking of NASA's Secrets

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

In order to save billions of dollars in research and development, some countries are using hackers to steal valuable information from America's military and scientific institutions and the defense industry that serves them.

America's Lifeline—Exports—Is Fraying Fast

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens to the U.S. as exports stop growing?

The New Silk Road

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Historic bonds between the Middle East and Asia are being revitalized in a torrent of trade and investment in energy, infrastructure, and manufacturing.

The Changes Business Wants

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

The Changes Business Wants

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

The Changes Business Wants

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

Taxes: Time to Forge a Compromise

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Business leaders say Obama's plan to end the tax deferment for overseas corporate profits will stymie growth.

Escaping the IRA Trap

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Older IRA owners are now facing forced liquidation of stocks to fund mandatory withdrawals at the worst possible time, given the market's dramatic fall.

Bangalore Backlash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The tech boom has brought highways, high-rises, malls, and nightclubs. Now many locals want their once-tranquil city back.

Why America Needs an Economic Strategy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How does America gain long-term prosperity?

Why America Needs an Economic Strategy

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

America's national competitiveness has resulted in one of the world's highest standards of living. That competitiveness is threatened by a focus on short- and intermediate-term objectives. America needs a comprehensive strategy to maintain our national competitiveness.

Why America Needs an Economic Strategy

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Harvard Business School competitiveness guru Michael E. Porter offers his prescription for long-term prosperity.

Personal Business

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Will stocks pay off for investors in the long run? It just depends on how long you're willing to wait. Is gold still the best shelter from market mayhem? Maybe Switzerland has something better to offer.

Personal Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Will stocks pay off for investors in the long run? It just depends on how long you're willing to wait. Is gold still the best shelter from market mayhem? Maybe Switzerland has something better to offer.

Personal Business

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will stocks pay off for investors in the long run? It just depends on how long you're willing to wait. Is gold still the best shelter from market mayhem? Maybe Switzerland has something better to offer.

How Companies Abuse Work Visas

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A new report confirms critics' charges against the H-1B program. But reforms are on the way.

Forget Adam Smith. Whatever Works

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we be doing about our economy?

Will Americans Buy Four-Cylinder Luxury?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

BMW is making a risky bet that horsepower-mad American drivers will go for cleaner and greener luxury in its 1, 3, and even 5 Series cars.

Will Americans Buy Four-Cylinder Luxury?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Four-cylinder engines have not sold well in the U.S. luxury-car segment. That may change as major manufacturers prepare for increased fuel economy and stricter emissions mandates.

The Credit-Card Blowup Ahead

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What's the next shoe to drop in our financial markets?

What Detroit Likes About the Crises

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

When less is more in distribution strategy

The German Hybrids Are Coming

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A new Mercedes sedan, due in the U.S. next year, is the first in a wave of high-end gas-electric models, but just how green is it?

The Anti-YouTube Is Starting to Click

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Many companies have been reluctant to take on YouTube (owned by Google). But thanks to a huge library of professionally created content, Hulu is attracting millions of viewers and many advertisers.

Bloodied but Still Strong

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is the global view of the U.S. economy?

More Pain Ahead

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How much will the credit crisis cost?

More Pain Ahead

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In the shakeout after Lehman, Merrill, and AIG, power shifts to Bank of America, Barclays, hedge funds, and private equity, while regulators keep a more watchful eye.

Brands: Moving Overseas to Move Upmarket

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Consumer goods regarded as workaday in their home countries often gain luxury cachet when launched in a foreign land.

65 mpg-But the U.S. Can't Have it

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Ford Motor Company has developed a new car that gets 65 miles to the gallon. However, the car will not be sold in the United States.

United: O'Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Is it time to liquidate United Airlines and let stronger hands manage the pieces? Would its liquidation help the industry as well as air travelers? According to Roben Farzad, the answer is yes.

United: O'Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Is it time to liquidate United Airlines and let stronger hands manage the pieces? Would its liquidation help the industry as well as air travelers? According to Roben Farzad, the answer is yes.

United: O'Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is it time to liquidate United Airlines and let stronger hands manage the pieces? Would its liquidation help the industry as well as air travelers? According to Roben Farzad, the answer is yes.

The Company Doctor Is Back

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Company medical clinics are springing up at Toyota, Harrah's, Disney, and elsewhere. And the savings are substantial.

Plugging America's Broadband Gap

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Only 60% of American households have broadband access, which puts the U.S. in 15th place among developed nations (the U.S. ranked 4th in 2001). One reason that more households haven't made the high-speed jump may be a broadband duopoly.

Cash for Trash

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Trash is becoming a financial asset rather than a liability. Recyclers can make vast profits from combing through ordinary rubbish, processing it, and then reselling it to other companies, and venture capitalists are scrambling to get in on the action.

Cash for Trash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Trash is becoming a financial asset rather than a liability. Recyclers can make vast profits from combing through ordinary rubbish, processing it, and then reselling it to other companies, and venture capitalists are scrambling to get in on the action.

Cash for Trash

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Trash is becoming a financial asset rather than a liability. Recyclers can make vast profits from combing through ordinary rubbish, processing it, and then reselling it to other companies, and venture capitalists are scrambling to get in on the action.

Wind: The Power. The Promise. The Business.

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A partial answer to America's energy crisis is springing up. But there's difficulty in building an industry that threatens the status quo.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Russia's Yandex, set to go public on Nasdaq, is innovating in a hurry to hold off the U.S. giant.

The War Over Offshore Wind Is Almost Over

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

It's no longer if, but when, where, and how many wind farms will go up along the U.S. coast.

Six Flags CEO Mark Shapiro on the Summer Ahead

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

The CEO of Six Flags talks about how his parks will compete for customers, his relationship with the ownership/shareholders, and his aggressive international expansion initiatives.

Nuclear's Tangled Economics

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can nuclear plants solve our energy crisis? And if so, at what cost?

Bear Scandal: A Widening Probe

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The SEC is expanding its investigation into the events surrounding the collapse of Bear Stearns.

Can the U.S. Bring Jobs Back From China?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can U.S. manufacturers seize the opportunity of higher energy costs to bring jobs back to the states?

GM: Burning Cash Like Rubber

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The big carmaker will need to dig up fresh capital just to keep operating.

Stalled in the USA: Europe's Small Cars

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The strong euro and expensive labor are making it tough for BMW, VW, Volvo, and some other European carmakers to show a profit in America.

Dimon May Go Shopping

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will there be more consolidations in financial institutions?

Dimon May Go Shopping

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

JPMorgan dodged subprime, bought Bear Sterns, and still has funds to spare.

Storm Warning

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Coastal residents and infrastructure planners, take note. The 2008 hurricane season, starting June 1, is expected to be worse than historical averages.

Hot Growth Companies

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

This special report includes a list of the top 50 hot growth companies as well as several reviews of companies that have managed to do well in a poor economy.

Hot Growth Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

This special report includes a list of the top 50 hot growth companies as well as several reviews of companies that have managed to do well in a poor economy.

Hot Growth Companies

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

This special report includes a list of the top 50 hot growth companies as well as several reviews of companies that have managed to do well in a poor economy.

Breaking Point

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How high will oil prices go?

Home Improvement an Inch at a Time

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hammered by the housing bust, Home Depot and Lowe's are selling do-it-yourselfers on cheaper fixes.

Cancer's Cruel Economics

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In the fight against cancer, is the FDA part of the problem?

A Wake-Up Call for Global Tax Cheats

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The IRS is on the hunt for hidden overseas assets.

The Majors Look West, Again

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Big Oil companies have neglected North American oil prospects for many years. That is changing as oil prices rise and opportunities overseas dry up.

Is Ethanol Getting a Bum Rap?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Corn-based fuel isn't the villain critics contend, but shifting to other crops is critical.

GM's Good News: A $3 Billion Loss

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Sure, it could have been worse. But GM needs to do much more to get its problems under control.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Renault-Nissan CEO is fighting to keep pace in the U.S. and chasing Chinese and Indian customers.

The Inflation Debate Grows Louder

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Where does the current economy leave inflation?

The Inflation Debate Grows Louder

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Increasing inflation might make it necessary to look at financial statements in a different light.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Indian giant TCS makes most of its money in the U.S., while Big Blue does the bulk of its business abroad. What does that imply?

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) makes most of its money in the U.S., while IBM does the bulk of its business abroad.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Information technology services companies have typically relied on the U.S. market for a majority of their revenues. However, last quarter India-based Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) reported 51% of its revenues from North America, while only 35% of Armonk (N.Y.)-based IBM's revenues were domestic.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

India-based Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) makes most of its money in the U.S. while IBM does the bulk of its business abroad. This juxtaposition helps to explain investor reaction to the companies

Gas May Finally Cost Too Much

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How much would you pay for a gallon of gas?

Does she Look Like a Music Pirate?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The recording industry has been accused of using tactics similar to debt-collection companies to address music piracy.

This is Not Your Father's Diesel

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A slew of high-mileage, low-emission diesel auto models destined for the U.S. market could give hybrids serious competition.

The Spending Mirage

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How should you invest in the current market?

Creative Capital

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Creative capital: Georges Doriot and the birth of venture capital by BusinessWeek Editor Spencer Ante documents the creation of the modern venture capital community.

Ireland: The End of the Miracle

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The powerful euro has crushed the country's decade-long economic expansion

China's Factory Blues

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The days of ultra-cheap labor and little regulation are gone. As manufacturers' costs climb, export prices will follow.

China's Factory Blues

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A combination of factors have made China the world's factory floor, but recent changes are forcing a restructuring of Chinese industry.

Refighting Nafta

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The free-trade deal is taking the blame for huge job losses. But its true effects on workers and competitiveness are far more complicated.

One World, one car, one Name

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Should companies use the same brand name for their products worldwide, or tailor the brand name to local conditions and languages?

My Way or the Highway at Hyundai

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Kia and Hyundai are trying to move upscale in the U.S. market, but culture clashes and management turmoil are making it difficult for these Korean brands to make their targets.

My Way or the Highway at Hyundai

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Aggressive growth plans and culture clashes between Korean and American management have led to tension in Hyundai's North American operations.

My Way or the Highway at Hyundai

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hyundai and its Kia subsidiary are trying to move upscale in the U.S., but culture clashes, management turmoil, and strategic discord are making for a bumpy ride.

Guess Who's Getting the Most Work Visas

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Surprise! Indian outsourcers top the list of companies bringing foreign workers to the U.S. on the H-1B program.

Multinationals: Are They Good for America?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Multinationals are productive, innovative, and loaded with cash. But that doesn't mean they'll bail out the U.S. economy.

Multinationals: Are They Good for America?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Multinationals are productive, innovative, and loaded with cash, but will they bail out the U.S. economy?

More Fodder for the Yank-Haters

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

American-style capitalism is being blamed for some of the subprime financial difficulties facing many European firms.

Green - up to a Point

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

U.S. companies are increasingly skeptical of measures to combat global warming, yet they want to be seen as green. Is is possible to have it both ways?

Survival of the Biggest

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will U.S. airlines be able to survive as independent carriers?

Over the Limit

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Americans accustomed to cheap and easy money - and an economy geared to their free-spending ways - face a harsh new reality as banks raise rates and lower credit ceilings on credit cards. This does not bode well for the economy, which depends heavily on consumer spending.

Over the Limit

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Americans accustomed to cheap and easy money - and an economy geared to their free-spending ways - face a harsh new reality as banks raise rates and lower credit ceilings on credit cards. This does not bode well for the economy, which depends heavily on consumer spending.

Over the Limit

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Americans accustomed to cheap and easy money - and an economy geared to their free-spending ways - face a harsh new reality as banks raise rates and lower credit ceilings on credit cards. This does not bode well for the economy, which depends heavily on consumer spending.

Why U.S. Telecom Is Losing Juice

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

U.S. telecom industry growth is sputtering because so many people already have cell phones and broadband. Is a shakeout ahead?

Economists Rethink Free Trade

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Should we maintain a free-trade agenda in the United States?

Are H-1B Workers Getting Bilked?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Some workers on H-1B visas are paid less than promised

Facetime Interview with Kenneth Lewis of Bank of America

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

This week's Facetime (BusinessWeek, January 28, 2008) presents an interview with Ken Lewis, the CEO of Bank of America (BofA), concerning BofA

An Industry That's Fraying Fast

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The rising value of the Indian rupee is causing financial difficulties for some Indian textile firms, and causing others to find cheaper locations outside India for production. And although India may be a growing information systems powerhouse with 2 million tech employees around Bangalore, the textile and apparel industry employs 88 million.

Now It's Really International Paper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

International Paper historically has not been very international. That is changing as it invests in pulp and paper production in Russia, Brazil, China, and other locations around the globe.

Facetime

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does Martin Feldstein, who was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, think about the current economy?

A Long, Long Wait for a Wii

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Why can't anyone find a Nintendo Wii in stock?

The Dangerous Wealth of the Ivy League

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Elite private universities have started a spending war with public universities. The fallout from that war threatens to change the face of higher education.

The Coming Commodity Clash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As industrial growth and infrastructure development continue to be strong in India and China, these countries' demand for basic commodities grows.

The Consumer Crunch

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In recent years the U.S. has seen narrowly-focused downturns in which a few sectors are hit hard while the rest of the economy and financial markets remain relatively unscathed. This time the positions will be reversed as consumers tank while much of the corporate sector stays on track.

The New Financial Heavyweights

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Sovereign wealth funds wield enormous influence in world financial markets. Do the risks outweigh the rewards?

Sotheby's Surprising Sizzle

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With the credit market bubble popping in the summer, many expected that the art bubble would burst as well. But it doesn't appear to have happened.

Green Biz: A Cracked Idea for Squeezing Hydrogen from Coal

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

There might be a way to use those ubiquitous cracked egg shells to help produce clean energy.

Chinese Banks Head for the U.S.

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

American banks are a bargain these days and Chinese financial firms with big plans are buying, according to the BusinessWeek article Chinese Banks Head for the U.S. (November 5, 2007). Flush with cash from going public and from strong growth at home, Chinese banks are now eyeing the U.S. It

A Helping Hand From Foreign Demand

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Solid growth around the world - particularly in developed and emerging markets - means trading partners provide extra help just when the U.S. needs it. The U.S. economy, according to the BusinessWeek article A Helping Hand From Foreign Demand (November 5, 2007), faces its toughest challenge since the 2001 recession. But it might just get by with a little help from its friends, as foreign trade has provided a huge lift to growth this year. The question is whether trade will continue to support the economy in 2008.


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