Regions

The U.S. Opioid Crisis Hits Tasmania’s Poppy Farmers

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Australia provides half of the world’s legal supply of raw opiate, but demand and prices are tumbling. Tasmanian farmers will plant about 12,000 hectares of poppies this season, less than half the 2013 harvest, in response to U.S. efforts to restrict consumption of opioid drugs.

‘I Need More Mexicans’

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The enforcement-only approach to immigration is leading to sharp labor shortages in agriculture and construction. The Trump administration is considering a merit-based immigration system similar to Canada's and Australia's.

One Tax to Rule Them All

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

India is about to become the next major world economy to adopt a simplified goods and services tax (GST), the equivalent of a sales tax. This promises to usher in business simplification, efficiency, and economic growth. The success (or failure) of this tax may eventually point the way to a whole new way of taxation for the U.S. economy.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The United States has the biggest agriculture industry on earth, yet farmers face mounting pressure from Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. Those rival countries, as well as others, are well-positioned to profit from the United States pulling back from trade deals.

The Flu Shot's Chicken-And-Egg Problem

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Flu vaccines are made from chicken eggs. Some companies are working on alternative sources, such as dog kidneys and Australian weeds, for the vaccines.

EBay Tries to Push Past Its Tag-Sale Roots

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

With the upscale Australian department store chain Myer, EBay created a Virtual Reality Department Store, giving away 20,000 "shopticals" that let shoppers browse merchandise via augmented reality. Differentiating EBay from Amazon is the centerpiece of CEO Devin Wenig’s strategy.

World's Best Sales Department?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Atlassian, a software company from Australia that makes popular project-management and chat apps, sold $320 million worth of business software last year without a single sales employee. Everyone in the industry noticed.

Sharing Everything But the Wealth

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The sharing economy doesn’t share the wealth. For instance, Airbnb’s more than forty subsidiaries may help the company lower its tax bill in the United States and other countries. Several countries are trying to crack down on corporate tax avoidance.

Your Uber Driver Has a House to Show You

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Real estate agents turn to Uber-driving amid prolonged property slump. Cars for hire increased 51 percent in the first half of 2015.

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

The soaring demand for fresh beef in China, in combination with the recent free-trade agreement between China and Australia, has led to live cattle being transported by air from Australia to mainland China.

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A new trade agreement between Australia and China has paved the way for additional trade. One development is the shipping of live cattle from Australia to China, where the cows are then slaughtered. Specialized containers have been developed to facilitate the shipping of cattle on Boeing 747 aircraft, which allows shipping to cities far from China's coast.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Dairy farms around the world are suffering from declining milk prices. A combination of reduced Chinese demand for imported milk and Russia’s ban on EU, American, and Australian milk has left the global market awash with milk. As a result, global dairy prices are falling with no turnaround in sight.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

High prices for milk last year caused farmers in many countries to invest in increased production.This year, with markets slowing in China and trade tensions with Russia, global trade in dairy products is down. Hence, dairy farmers worldwide are in a tough financial bind.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

The Dilemma of Digital Free Trade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can data that is stored in another country be kept safe and private?

Coffee, Mate

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Starbucks' flat white is being introduced in the U.S. after successful runs in Australia and Britain.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

As the Chinese buy less coal and iron ore from Australia, the country can rely more on farming and tourism.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Australian exports of coal and minerals to China are falling, while exports of beef are rising.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

China’s economic slump crushes demand for iron ore and coal.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Love Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the current state of the market for cruise lines in Asia, and how will it change in the future?

Can Etihad's Flock of Also-Rans Fly?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways is betting that its investments in a global network of smaller, cash-strapped airlines will be a successful long-term play.

Australia Is Immune To China’s Flu

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Construction and employment in Australia are rebounding, aided by rate cuts.

Need a New Building? Call the Philippines

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcing large components of buildings or factories can cut costs and improve quality.

Retirement Savings Done Right

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In Australia, at least 3 percent of every worker’s paycheck goes into a compulsory retirement savings program. Should Americans be required to save more for retirement?

Your Phone Knows What You're Watching

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

TV networks are investing in an app that keeps viewers subsidizing the TV ad model even while glancing down at their phone.

A Chinese Implant Takes Aim at Cochlear

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

What did you say? There's huge profits in helping people hear?

Investing for the Apocalypse

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How can you profit from future climate change? Where is the “smart money” investing in this area?

Before the Fancy Bottle, Time Spent in a Bladder

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Most wine exported from Australia now ships in container-sized plastic bladders, to be bottled after the ocean journey.

How a Turkish Immigrant Made a Billion Dollars in Eight Years Selling Yogurt

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Chobani dominates the rapidly growing Greek style yogurt segment, but the two big yogurt players, Dannon and Yoplait, are chipping away at their lead. Can Chobani remain independent and in the lead?

How a Turkish Immigrant Made a Billion Dollars in Eight Years Selling Yogurt

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Hamdi Ulukaya, a Turkish immigrant, is an billion dollar American success story. Chobani’s payroll has almost doubled in the past year with plants in Idaho and Australia, and more growth is on the horizon. Can the yogurt be that good?

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

The Marlboro Man's Grisly Replacement

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The cigarette industry is watching strict packaging requirements in Australia very closely. The industry fears that new tobacco control measures in Australia are likely to spread to other countries.

The Marlboro Man's Grisly Replacement

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Australia now requires cigarette packaging to include graphic anti-smoking images, with no logos and the brand name in a standard font on a drab, dark brown background.

China Slows, Australia Freezes

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Australia has benefited greatly from China's economic boom, but now may also suffer the consequences of its slowing economy.

China Slows, Australia Freezes

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is Australia's economic pain more evidence of China's importance in the world economy?

Doing Business With the Frenemy

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S. military has sourced $400 million worth of helicopters from an unlikely source: the same Russian military contractor that is arming the Syrian government.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Is it time for a low-cost strategy in the smartphone business? And is a Chinese company best positioned to do that?

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

Qantas's Asia Problem: So Near, Yet So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Saddled with high costs, Qantas has a difficult time competing in the growing Asian market.

Fight Club for Geeks

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

A startup's competitions lure PhDs and whiz kids to solve companies's data problems.

Liquefied Natural Gas: Target Asia

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

North American natural gas prices are half what they were in 2008. A boom in LNG exports could change that.

9 Ideas From Around the World to Fix the U.S. Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do to get the U.S. economy going again? Countries as diverse as Germany, Brazil, Singapore, and Thailand can offer ways for the U.S. to shore up its economy.

China's Power Outages Come Early and Often

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although the rates they can charge are regulated, the price of coal is not, putting Chinese power companies in a tough spot.

Hungry for a Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can a rainy spring in Saskatchewan contribute to the overthrow of a government in Tunisia?

It's Aussie Farmers vs. Chinese Companies

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

In drought-stricken Western Australia, a battle for water highlights issues about how social and economic priorities should influence the allocation of this vital resource.

It's Aussie Farmers vs. Chinese Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Water from underground aquifers in Australia is being fought over by exporters of agricultural products and iron ore processors.

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Should U.S. coal companies be able export more coal and the carbon emissions it will produce?

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As U.S. electricity producers shift away from coal, coal producers are seeking export markets where there is less concern over carbon dioxide emissions.

In France, There's Pain in the Rising Cost of Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a drought in Russia and floods in Canada and Australia, wheat prices have doubled in the past year. Now the French are seeing increases in the price of baguettes.

An Iron Ore Rush Above the Arctic Circle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Booming demand for steel in developing countries is opening up Canada's Arctic region to iron ore mining.

Back to the Economic Future

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is there a future for macroeconomics?

Food: Freaky Weather, Scary Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While food may be consumed locally, it is grown worldwide. The price of groceries in the U.S. is directly impacted by the weather in Argentina, Russia, Australia and everywhere else in the world.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The Filipino workforce, well trained in English, is luring call center operations from Bangalore and Gurgaon. Cost-conscious operations managers should take note.

The Economics of Alternative Energy

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Electricity generated from fossil fuels is starting to lose its price edge over some renewable energy sources. When will it be time for energy producers and consumers to jump on board?

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's booming demand for iron ore is causing opportunities and problems in Australia.

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Exports to China have helped Australia escape the global recession. Nonetheless, many Australians are worried.

Australia's Mother Lode of Mining Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Brisk demand for minerals has led to a mining boom in Australia. It offers great pay, but you could get killed.

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Ford make up for lost time in Asia?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting production, as well as investment and marketing, in fast-growing China and India

Yahoo Opens its Checkbook

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Yahoo is interested in purchasing companies that bring the Web portal more users

Grief for Greenbacks

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why do exchange rates change, how are currencies priced, and what are the accounting implications? These are complex questions which accountants must understand in this era of global trade and transfer.

M&A: Behind the Heat on Global Deals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Heightened antitrust action, such as China's no on Coke-Huiyuan, may signal a new approach to protectionism.

Wireless Web Phones for Less Than $50

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

A new subsidiary of Hutchison Whampoa, INQ, plans to make ultracheap mobile phones for surfing the Net.


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