Regions

Dept. of Shell Companies, Clandestine Accounts, & Bribery

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

An accounting spreadsheet, and a rat, helped bring down a decades-old Brazilian construction giant. It seems that the company's fraudulent activity was so vast that it took complex spreadsheets to track it all. Then an errant email about a rat in a grill led to a Hotmail account that contained the elicit files!

Dept. of Shell Companies, Clandestine Accounts & Bribery

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Odebrecht, a Brazilian construction firm, has paid hundreds of millions of dollars in fines and seen several of its executives go to jail in one of the largest corruption scandals in recent history. Odebrecht, established in 1944, paid bribes throughout Latin American and the Caribbean in seeking large construction contracts.

Dept. of Shell Companies, Clandestine Accounts, & Bribery

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Corruption and bribery may be more common than not in the Brazilian construction industry, but for Odebrecht SA it grew over decades to a scale that ultimately proved unsustainable. In exchange for shorter sentences, Odebrecht principals are providing details of their transactions and the systems they devised to support bribery activities. This in turn, is revealing the roles banks and others played, both inside of Brazil and in other countries.

Two Latin Singers—and Justin Bieber—Hit No. 1

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Bilingual remixes and collaborations with global stars may be the key to Latin music's crossover success.

Waze Wants to Help You Hitch a Ride

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Google's Waze is doing more than just traffic maps. Now it's trying its hand at carpooling.

IFly and the Rise of Indoor Sky Diving

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Did you hear the one about the newly married attorney who quit his well-paying job to join the U.S. skydiving team? He ended up making millions.

Will Bad Beef Taint Brazil's Meat Master?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Accusations and probes into tainted and unhealthy beef and poultry-processing plants in Brazil and the shipments from that country to Asian, European, and other Latin American countries is a growing concern. The charges of poor production operations, unsanitary conditions, and bribery could jeopardize the IPO of the leading Brazilian processor, JBS SA, and make any investment in the company unappetizing.

Will Bad Beef Taint Brazil's Meat Master?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Brazil's JBS SA is the world's largest meat producer and is preparing to raise additional funds via bond sales and a partial stock listing. JBS has grown through a series of acquisitions, spending $20 billion in the past decade. Recent investigations into the bribing of Brazilian meat inspectors to overlook food safety violations are now spooking foreign customers and threatening to derail JBS's stock offering.

Brazil Has a School Problem

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Brazil spends heavily on for-profit colleges but it neglects adequate investment in K-12 public education schools. In addition, for-profit colleges in Brazil enroll the vast majority of the country’s college students who are predominantly from public schools and ill-prepared for college-level coursework.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The United States has the biggest agriculture industry on earth, yet farmers face mounting pressure from Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. Those rival countries, as well as others, are well-positioned to profit from the United States pulling back from trade deals.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The U.S. agriculture industry depends heavily on exports, with more than half of U.S. wheat, rice, cotton, and soybean production traded overseas. Uncertainty over Trump’s farm policy, along with his administration’s clear signals to scuttle multilateral trade agreements, could be good news for farmers in Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. With Trump pulling out of the Trans Pacific Partnership on trade, which was backed by farmers, countries that remain in the partnership may have preferential access to important markets.

In Brazil, It’s Now Beer—Without the Babes

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

After years of using sex to sell beer, a long recession forces some Brazilian brewers to avoid female stereotypes and sell directly to women. The result? The country’s top four beer producers are tapping into the “gender-friendly” wave commonplace in many markets globally.

In Brazil, It's Now Beer—Without the Babes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Brazil is an important market in the worldwide beer industry, and this is the season for summertime beer ads. Compared to other years, however, the ads are a little more tame and less sexy. While this may be partly related to changing advertising norms, it also reflects the increasing importance of women as customers.

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine’s Agriculture

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Ukraine’s black earth could make the country a world leader in agriculture, but the country still suffers for a lack of finance and infrastructure. If Ukraine could settle its conflict with Russia over Crimea, foreign investors would have more confidence investing in the country.

Como se dice 'Uber'?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After ceding China, Uber, the ride-hailing giant, plans to double its presence in Latin America by the end of 2017. As long as Uber’s competitors there try to make money on each ride, the region will remain far more affordable for Uber than India or China.

Brazil’s Economic Policy Lurches Right

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Brazil’s former president, Dilma Rousseff, struggled to manage the economy with an interventionist policy that led to a recession. As a result, Brazil’s new president, Michael Temer, decided to put in place free market practices to fix the weak economy.

Can Bombardier Fly With the Big Boys?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bombardier's goal of competing with Boeing and Airbus in the market for 100-plus seat aircraft has fallen short of expectations. While Bombardier has received orders and is getting ready to deliver its first aircraft, its order book is much weaker than it anticipated. With its stock trading below a dollar and the company operating at a loss, the Quebec and Canadian governments may need to step in to provide financial backing (and save jobs).

In Brazil, Getting It There is No Fun at All

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Keeping production cost low is important for any firm, but inbound and outbound logistics within the linked value chain have powerful impacts as well. Infrastructural components can create advantages and disadvantages in the global market.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

Things Are About to Get Ugly at Kraft

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

3G Capital and Warren Buffett are focused on cost-cutting and operational efficiency to boost profits at moribund Kraft. But analysts are concerned about the long-term value of the firm's brands in the evolving packaged-foods industry.

Things Are About to Get Ugly at Kraft

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Warren Buffett and 3G Capital have made one big promise: They’ll cut $1.5 billion in annual costs from Kraft Heinz before 2018. The company will lose employees, whole levels of management, and maybe a few brands, too. Will it be a boon to investors?

Wal-Mart Has Found a New Discount: Its Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Wal-Mart reduced its tax burden in recent years?

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

Find the Women in This Crowd

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Purchases of pay-per-view events for Ultimate Fighting Championship matches have fallen by one third since 2010. The response to this decline is to attract more women to the “human cockfighting” sport with a reputation for domestic violence. The effort will be a challenge.

In Brazil, It’s Reading, Writing, and Reelection

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Unemployment in Brazil has dipped to a low of 5.2 percent, despite the onset of a recession.

Another World Cup Surprise: TV Ratings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

After tremendous doubt about Brazil’s ability to make it happen, the World Cup wins. The match between the U.S. and Portugal on ESPN drew 18.2 million viewers, a record for soccer. Brave World Cup sponsors could not be happier.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The next car an American purchases—even if it has a German or Japanese brand name—might just be made in Mexico.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Thanks to low labor costs and a booming U.S. market, it appears that Mexico will soon produce more cars than Brazil.

Why Mexico is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

With labor costs just 20 percent of those in the United States, Mexico could pass Brazil to become the No. 7 auto producer.

Droid Killer?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Cheap smartphones running Firefox's mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

Will World Cup Sponsors Get Kicked, Too?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Coca-Cola has invested $4 billion this year on marketing as Brazil’s 2014 World Cup, the biggest soccer party on the planet, is now plagued with protests. What will Coke do if things go as badly, as some predict?

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nike is making a big push to catch Adidas in the soccer gear market.

Why Wal-Mart Hasn't Conquered Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Wal-Mart's everyday low prices aren't so popular in Brazil.

The Dismal Economics of Megadams

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A study of megadams in 65 countries found that cost overruns averaging 96 percent imperil most projects.

This "Baby" Jeep Has An Italian Accent

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The new Jeep Renegade represents the potential of the merged Fiat and Chrysler to efficiently launch a global product.

Rousseff’s Reelection Calculus

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Brazil’s president has prioritized social programs over the economy.

Bad Loans Could Spark an Emerging-Markets Crisis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for the debt of emerging-markets corporations?

Russia's Web Payment Czar Looks West

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Russia, cash is king, with many consumers looking to e-cash rather than banks or credit cards to pay their bills.

Nothing Man

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How did Eike Batista go from being a billionaire to being near bankruptcy?

In Brazil, Highway Robbery Is Just That

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why is Paranapanema, Brazil’s largest refined copper producer, switching its domestic shipments to slow-moving freighters from swifter trucks?

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

M.A.C. cosmetics finds sales opportunities for its high-end products in ethnic areas and emerging markets.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Estee Lauder is using its M.A.C. cosmetics line, a hit with ethnic consumers at home, to enter emerging markets.

Lured From Retirement To Save Fiat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Lorenzo Ramaciotti has a challenge in balancing consistency across brands with creating unique identities for Fiat's wide range of vehicles worldwide.

Charlie Rose Talks to Kenneth Rogoff

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Kenneth Rogoff has found that debt levels of 90-100% of GDP for a country will slow the country’s future GDP growth. Does he think the United States is going the way of Greece or Japan?

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cost cutting at AB InBev has recently caused profits to climb, but sales have suffered. Is the attempt to cut costs affecting the taste of the beers AB InBev brews?

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

AB InBev's corporate strategy has improved profits and rewarded stockholders, but many beer drinkers are not happy about what's happening to their favorite beer.

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

Brazil Gets a Dose of The Free Market

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Brazil's president hopes to attract $39.5 billion in private capital over five years by offering companies licenses to operate roads and railroads

Big Green Profit Machine

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

How has John Deere increased its international operations?

P&G Woos the Hearts, Minds, and Schools of Vietnam

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Can extensive and intensive marketing make P&G the market leader in Vietnam?

Over a Barrel

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A minor oil spill off the coast of Brazil has turned into a financial and public relations nightmare for Chevron Corporation.

Over A Barrel

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chevron and its managers in Brazil face criminal charges over an oil spill.

Over a Barrel

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Although Chevron handled a relatively small oil spill according to industry standards, Brazil is relentlessly prosecuting the company.

Over a Barrel

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Chevron faces a multibillion dollar environmental lawsuit and criminal prosecutions for a relatively small oil spill off the coast of Brazil. Is this an anomaly or the early stage of a new global trend that oil companies need to incorporate in their risk management?

Look Who's Bringing Up the Rear

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

protectionism, tariffs, monetary policy, currency, Brazil, BRIC nations

Look Who's Bringing Up the Rear

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Brazil's economic growth has it bringing up the rear among the BRICS nations. It remains to be seen whether or not leftist economic policies can successfully address the situation.

Outsourcing: A Passage Out of India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As more high-skilled jobs are outsourced, corporations seek locations closer to home.

A False Brigade

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the emerging economies save Europe?

Yankee Chicken Go Home!

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would you move an oversupply of dark meat?

9 Ideas From Around the World to Fix the U.S. Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do to get the U.S. economy going again? Countries as diverse as Germany, Brazil, Singapore, and Thailand can offer ways for the U.S. to shore up its economy.

Puma is No Longer a Sneaker. It’s a Lifestyle

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

PPR is repositioning the sports-apparel maker as the Gucci of the athletic shoe market.

Brazil's New Middle Class Goes on a Spree

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As the Brazilian economy booms, shantytown residents buy on installment and pile on the debt. The government is worried about the prospect of defaults.

How to Beat the High Cost of Happy Workers

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

China's maker of iPhones and iPads raised wages and lowered suicides. But it also lost money. Now Foxconn is seeking cheaper labor.

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

Getting Social Media Games to Play Overseas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To generate revenues from virtual goods, social media gaming companies look to localize their products abroad.

Did the Continental Drift Create an Oil Bonanza?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

A bet that a vast oil field lies off the coast of French Guiana may prove a geological theory and pay off big for Tullow Oil and its partners.

An Iron Ore Rush Above the Arctic Circle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Booming demand for steel in developing countries is opening up Canada's Arctic region to iron ore mining.

Don't Go to Rio For a Deal on an iPad

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Brazil's industrial policy places a high tax on imports in order to encourage domestic production and foreign investment.

The Partnership

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

The Partnership

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

The Partnership

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

A Whopper of a Challenge for Burger King's Buyers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Burger King was recently acquired for $4 billion. The challenges of turning the company around are so vast that one is forced to wonder: why?

The World's Most Caffeinated Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Coffee consumption and economic growth appear to be linked.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Brazil is emerging as a key battleground for the hearts, minds, and wallets of Latin America's middle class.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and local rival Companhia Brasileira de Distribuic

Deadly Business in Moscow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The lawlessness of the legal system can make business in Russia difficult.

Deadly Business in Moscow

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Russia has fallen out of favor with international investors because of its corruption and abuse of business people.

Should Developing Nations Clamp Down on Hot Money?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Capital controls may be making a comeback as countries try to control inflationary bubbles.

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

Brazil's Coming Rebound

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With sound banks, effective government policies and strong consumer spending, Brazil may finally be on the way to economic growth.

Can Nike Help Save the Amazon?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

To discourage environmentally destructive cattle-farming practices, Nike is requiring Brazilian leather suppliers to document the origins of their hides. Will other companies follow Nike's lead?

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Mobile-phone chipmaker Qualcomm and startup Zeebo are introducing an inexpensive gaming console that will focus on what marketers dub the next billion. These consumers live in developing nations, have rising incomes and modest savings, and together spend $1 trillion annually.

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Startup Zeebo is betting the growing middle class in emerging markets will take to its affordable console.

China's Doubts about the Dollar

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will U.S. deficits do to the value of the dollar?

What's Driving Up the Dollar

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A flight to safety, in particular, is overpowering dismal U.S. economic news.

Cisco's Brave New World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cisco, the technology company that sells everything from million-dollar routers to videoconferencing systems, also has consulting services to help companies and countries upgrade their infrastructure.

With a Soaring Yen, Japan Is Buying

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With a weak local market and a strong currency, many Japanese firms are taking the opportunity to make overseas investments.

Bulking up: Japan's drugmakers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japanese drugmakers are on an overseas acquisition binge to get bigger. For the first time, they pose a competitive threat to the big Western firms.

Fly the Shrinking Skies

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Spiking oil prices will eliminate carriers and reduce nonstop flights

Brazil's Answer to Global Hunger

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Brazil must strike a balance between preserving the Amazon rain forest and savannah regions in their natural state and converting this land to agricultural production that can help feed the hungry worldwide.

Brazil's Answer to Global Hunger

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Soaring food prices are giving farmers in Brazil a political edge in the battle between agribusiness and environmentalism.

Brazil's Answer to Global Hunger

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Brazil is a major food exporter. That production is coming increasingly from recently cleared savannah and rain forest.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault-Nissan, is working to position his company for the new reality of the worldwide auto industry: increased demand for smaller, more fuel-efficient cars designed to appeal to local market needs and tastes.

Brazil's Iron Giant Reaches for the Top

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the world's mining and steel making industries, every firm seems to be predator, prey or both.

International Isn't Just IBM's First Name

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

IBM has had to undergo a monumental shift in its operational philosophy. In the past three years, IBM has hired more than 90,000 people in fast-developing countries like Brazil, China, and India.

Now It's Really International Paper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

International Paper historically has not been very international. That is changing as it invests in pulp and paper production in Russia, Brazil, China, and other locations around the globe.


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