Regions

Satellite Pics for Cheap!!

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

An Iranian immigrant in Silicon Valley is challenging the $500 million behemoths and touting night shots that pierce cloud cover. Spy-quality satellite imaging for cheap.

Blockchain Can Grow More Than Just Money

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Ethereum could present a whole new way to run a business, but there are some serious kinks to work out. Ethereum’s ledger can store fully functioning computer programs called smart contracts.

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Carmakers Could Hit That Wall, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The North American automotive industry is highly integrated across Canada, the U.S., and Mexico, with parts and vehicles flowing back and forth across borders. All that could change if Donald Trump follows through on his threats to levy import taxes and cut trade with Canada and Mexico. The implications for automakers from Ford to Toyota to Volkswagen are significant, as are the resultant rise in prices of that U.S. consumers would face.

A License to Print Plastic

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Does the future belong to plastic cash? Polymer bills cost about twice as much as paper, but last five times as long (and can survive the washing machine).

A Saudi About-Face

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has initiated plans to lead OPEC in production cuts that are designed to reduce the oil glut and raise crude oil prices globally. Production increases in non-OPEC countries and Saudi Arabia itself contributed to production that drove down prices. Now, the oil ministry is changing direction in order to steer prices higher and reduce the damaging economic impact on its own economy.

California’s Recycling Industry Is in the Dumps

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

An unanticipated consequence of low global economic growth is the decline in prices for recycled scrap. As demand for recycled scrap declines, the price paid for containers, as well as an incentive to recycle them, has been trashed.

The Foxconn of the Auto Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Any company considering entry into the auto industry will likely be in contact with Magna International. Magna makes a variety of components that go into most autos, and operates assembly lines that produce cars for certain auto companies. It is currently exploring how it might create a platform that companies considering entering the auto industry could use as the basis for their vehicles.

Chipuffulo Wings, Bhangra Burger, Mai Tai, Masala Fries, Crispy Duck Topped With Ossau-Iraty Cheese

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Some of the tastiest, most inventive food in London is served from trucks and open-air market stalls. But chasing down mouthwatering tuna-sashimi tostadas or curry-infused burgers, then finding a place to sit down and enjoy them, can take some effort. Entrepreneurs Jonathan Downey and Henry Dimbleby have a solution.

Is the U.S. Missing the TPP Train?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership has competition from the Chinese-led Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Both agreements have their boosters and detractors. The conflict illustrates how economics and politics are globally intertwined and are on the political front burner this election year.

Building Assisted Living for the 1 Percent

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Residents' monthly costs at Midtown assisted living building top $20,000. An owner of assisted living facilities is looking to get in on New York's luxury housing boom.

What Happened to Those Amber Waves?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

There are several factors that has caused the U.S. to lose its status as the world’s leading exporter of wheat. While new technology may reverse the decline in wheat production, the main cause is the greater profitability of substitute crops, such as corn and soybeans.

What Happened to Those Amber Waves?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Whereas the U.S. used to be the world's largest exporter of wheat, it has lost that position Russia, with Canada poised to push the U.S. to third place. The reasons behind this shift are complex, including improved supply from, and growing conditions in, Russia and Canada. The quality of U.S. wheat still commands a price premium in the market, but the rise in the U.S. dollar makes it less competitive in global markets.

A Paperless Air Traffic System Has Many Fans

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

NAV CANADA's software guides the skies over nine countries. The success of Canada’s system had led some U.S. lawmakers to push for partial privatization of the FAA’s air traffic division.

A Paperless Air Traffic System Has Many Fans

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Canada no longer uses paper strips for air traffic control. The country's new computer system comes from a nonprofit corporation.

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The U.S. television industry produced more than 400 scripted series last year, a record. That’s causing shortages. An explosion in American television production is threatening to overwhelm filming facilities from California to Canada and Georgia.

The Loonie Is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The National Hockey League (NHL) keeps its books in U.S. dollars, with all revenues expenses earned in other currencies converted to U.S. dollars (not unlike many U.S.-based multinational firms). The recent fall in the Canadian dollar, however, means that the league will be reporting lower overall revenue when the Canadian funds are converted to U.S. dollars. With about a third of the NHL's revenues coming from Canada, an 18% drop in the exchange rate means that revenues would fall around 6%. All player salaries, however, are negotiated in U.S. dollars.

The Loonie is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Approximately one third of National Hockey League (NHL) revenue is generated in Canada. Since the league’s compensation arrangement is based on revenue sharing and salaries measured and paid in U.S. dollars, the weak Canadian dollar is affecting team owners and players. The revenue sharing arrangement, a variation on profit-sharing, means that players and owners share in the currency risk.

Can Bombardier Fly With the Big Boys?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bombardier's goal of competing with Boeing and Airbus in the market for 100-plus seat aircraft has fallen short of expectations. While Bombardier has received orders and is getting ready to deliver its first aircraft, its order book is much weaker than it anticipated. With its stock trading below a dollar and the company operating at a loss, the Quebec and Canadian governments may need to step in to provide financial backing (and save jobs).

Canada's AI Experts Head South

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Canada's investment in neural network technology has helped its universities develop significant expertise in artificial intelligence. Technology firms such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter have hired Canadian artificial intelligence experts, and/or purchased companies and the technology they helped develop. While there is some concern regarding a brain drain with these high skilled employees moving to the U.S., it is helping the government and universities realize that they need to do more to help retain and attract this human capital in Canada.

Silicon Valley Investors Look North

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Canada is becoming an increasingly attractive location for software companies, as employment in the Canadian hardware industry drops. Canada’s venture funding has doubled in five years, to $2.4 billion.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

Wal-Mart Has Found a New Discount: Its Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Wal-Mart reduced its tax burden in recent years?

The Secret Sauce

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How Buffalo Wild Wings turned the sports bar into a $1.5 billion juggernaut.

The Secret Sauce

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

With $1.5 billion in annual revenue, Buffalo Wild Wings is breaking records in the casual-dining category.

Painting the Keystone XL Pipeline Green

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Critics have found flaws in the Environmental Resources Management (ERM) environmental impact report on the Keystone XL Pipeline written for the U.S. State Department.

Why Target is Raking Up Its Maple Leaves

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Target grew huge by building 130,000-square-foot stores in suburbs. Now it’s seeking growth with smaller stores in cities.

Why Target is Raking Up Its Maple Leaves

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Target has admitted failure and is pulling back from its first international expansion into Canada.

Why Target is Raking Up Its Maple Leaves

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Target is cutting its losses and exiting the Canadian market.

Persuading Israel's Tech Firms to IPO at Home

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurs prefer to list their companies' shares in the U.S.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What plans does Netflix have for expansion in Europe?

Have We Reached Peak Burger?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Current trends leave the future of legacy burger-and-fries chains in question.

The Ninja Turtles Save Summer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hollywood is suffering from overcrowding during its key season.

As Canadian as Huawei?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei is finding growth opportunities in Canada that it wasn't finding in the United States.

Who Cares About Keystone XL?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Delays on the KXL force pipeline companies to find alternatives.

Selling a Brand, Shot by Shot

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

A shot in the dark? Fireball Cinnamon Whisky has become one of the most successful liquor brands in decades, with annual sales now exceeding $80 million.

Good for Kids, Good for Publishers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

First Book Marketplace accounted for 2 percent of all juvenile books sold in the United States last year to an unlikely audience at a surprising price. Why is everyone involved winning?

The LIfe and Times of a Sirlion Steak

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Meatpackers are suing to block a federal rule requiring Country of Origin Labeling on beef sold in the U.S.

The J.Crew Invasion

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

J.Crew is invading London with American style at a higher price point. Will it succeed where others have failed?

Mega Death

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Can Service Corporation International continue to grow in the business of funeral homes and cemeteries?

A Keystone Pipeline That's Ready to Roll

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

TransCanada plans to increase the amount of oil the Keystone Gulf Coast will carry to 830,000 barrels a day.

Chemical Companies Are Rushing To The U.S.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Abundant natural gas in the U.S. is driving investment in chemical, plastics, and fertilizer plants on the Gulf Coast.

Canada's Oil Industry Begs to be Taxed

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Why are Canadian oil companies encouraging the government to impose pollution taxes on oil extracted from the tar sands?

Frackonomics Rattles The Global Oil Industry

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

U.S. production of light, sweet crude is increasing dramatically because of fracking. However, imports of heavy crude from Canada are likely to remain high because of capital investments by large U.S. refineries to enable processing of heavier crude oil. The good news is that the increase in light, sweet supply is sure to drive world prices down.

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

For Oil, Coal, and Gas, Is Obama Friend or Foe?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is Obama now going for a "full-throated" endorsement of oil and natural gas production in the United States? Meanwhile, does an EPA-led "war on coal" continue?

Molson Coor's Gets Banged Up in Hockey

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The NHL lockout is hurting brewers such as Molson Coors -- as well as bars and restaurants near NHL arenas.

Canada's Corn Belt Attracts the Hot Money

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The prairies of western Canada have long been known for wheat. Now as a result of strong global demand (which leads to high prices), a warming climate, and new corn varieties, more corn is being grown on the Canadian prairies.

The Marlboro Man's Grisly Replacement

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The cigarette industry is watching strict packaging requirements in Australia very closely. The industry fears that new tobacco control measures in Australia are likely to spread to other countries.

The Rise of the Corporate Chaplain

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Numerous companies have hired chaplains to work with their employees.

CNOOC: A Mega Energy Deal in Canada

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Move aside, USA - here comes a Chinese company to produce oil in Canada and ship it back home - to Beijing, that is.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei has moved up from number seven worldwide in the smartphone market to perhaps number three.

Big Green Profit Machine

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

How has John Deere increased its international operations?

Mapping the Way to a Global Free-Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The more nations involved in trade-liberalizing negotiations, the harder it is to get things accomplished.

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

Canada and the U.S. Try to Cuddle Up Again

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Reforms spelled out in a joint plan signed by Obama and Harper could give a boost to trade slowed by post-Sept. 11 border tightening.

Nafta's Rolling Thunder

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A welcome end to the U.S.-Mexico trucking dispute - how can operations managers take advantage of it?

9 Ideas From Around the World to Fix the U.S. Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do to get the U.S. economy going again? Countries as diverse as Germany, Brazil, Singapore, and Thailand can offer ways for the U.S. to shore up its economy.

Hungry for a Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can a rainy spring in Saskatchewan contribute to the overthrow of a government in Tunisia?

In France, There's Pain in the Rising Cost of Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a drought in Russia and floods in Canada and Australia, wheat prices have doubled in the past year. Now the French are seeing increases in the price of baguettes.

An Iron Ore Rush Above the Arctic Circle

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Booming demand for steel in developing countries is opening up Canada's Arctic region to iron ore mining.

A Global Scare in Food Prices

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With drought and flood hurting harvests - and population growth increasing demand - some forecasters see significant food price increases in 2011.

Those Amber Waves Are Fueling Exports

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a weak dollar and poor growing conditions in Europe, U.S. farm exports are strong this year.

The United States of Tariffs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. has used tariffs for more than two centuries to raise revenue and protect American industry. Will this work again in an era of diminished American power?

Hunting for Growth: The Overseas Adventurers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While many companies are scaling back their global ambitions amid the recession, others are looking to gain a bigger foothold abroad.

M&A: Behind the Heat on Global Deals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Heightened antitrust action, such as China's no on Coke-Huiyuan, may signal a new approach to protectionism.

'This Would Be Bigger Than NAFTA'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Quebec is easing commerce and labor barriers with France, which may lead to a broader Canada-EU deal.

Exporting America's Travails

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What role will the global economy play on a U.S. downturn?

The Dirty Dilemma of Canadian Crude

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Can potential unintended consequences make an environmental group's successful tactic undesirable?

The Dirty Dilemma of Canadian Crude

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is the security of using Canadian crude oil worth its environmental costs?


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