Regions

"Hollywood"

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Trump’s talk of hard line dealing with China over trade has Hollywood worried. The Chinese had promised to further open their lucrative film market this year, and Hollywood doesn’t want anything to change their minds.

"Hollywood"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The U.S. and Chinese film industries have become increasingly interdependent, with big U.S. studios counting on Chinese financing and ticket sales. Last year the Chinese market generated 19 percent of global box office sales and had higher revenues than U.S. theaters for some films. In addition, Chinese firms have made major investments in U.S. movie theaters and film studios.

Apple Tries the Full-Court Press

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Apple is suing Qualcomm on antitrust grounds over licensing fees. Qualcomm makes most of the advanced chips for cell phones and licenses its intellectual property. Apple is arguing that Qualcomm should base its licensing fees on the cost of components and not a percentage of the retail price of the phone, whether the phones use Qualcomm chips or not.

IBM’s Big Jobs Dodge

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

While IBM talks about Trump-pleasing hiring plans, it's firing thousands. IBM pledged to hire 25,000 workers over four years, but it's continuing to fire American workers and move their jobs abroad. It wasn't long before employees were accusing the company's CEO of hypocrisy.

The Chinese Rediscover Luxury

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A crackdown on bribery and concerns over conspicuous consumption have slowed demand for luxury goods in China. Data suggests that the country's wealthier consumers haven't stopped spending, however; rather, they've shifted their consumption pattern. The end result may mean a more sustainable growth rate for makers of high-end goods.

Pharma's Worst Nightmare

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Celebration of Trump’s victory by pharmaceutical executives turned to fear when he suggested they should bid for the government’s business as well as bring manufacturing back to the U.S. But Trump will have to overcome the powerful pharmaceutical lobby to get such measures through the Republican Congress.

No Golden Years for China's Villagers

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Those living in China's countryside bear the brunt of an aging crisis. About 60 percent of China's senior citizens live in rural areas, where poverty is widespread and health care is poor. In fact, the elderly do not seek medical help unless they must, due to treatment cost concerns.

Japan’s Big Bet

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Gambling is big business in Japan, and the casino gaming industry is about to see how big legalized gambling can be. Recent legislation will permit casinos to operate in the country. The potential size could be on a scale that dwarfs Las Vegas or even approaches the revenues of Macau.

Where Did You Get That Lovely Supply Chain?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Kering, the corporate parent of many famous fashion brands, including Yves Saint Laurent, Puma, and Gucci, has taken steps to improve the business practices of its suppliers down the supply chain. Francois-Henri Pinault has followed in his father's footsteps in developing a corporate culture that tries to make the world a better place while also making money. Each year the company produces a corporate sustainability report that outlines steps it takes to make the world a better place while also making high-end luxury products.

China Gets Serious About Shrinking Steel

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is the world's leading steel exporter, and in the process has driven down worldwide steel prices. The Chinese government is now trying to restructure its domestic steel industry, closing smaller producers. This should help the country reduce air pollution while giving some financial relief to other steel makers.

So Let's Talk About That Seafood Platter

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The global supply chain that brings shrimp and fish to your neighborhood restaurant or grocery store can be very opaque. For centuries, aquaculture has been a part of the Chinese food supply, and the Chinese seafood industry has grown to become one of the largest producers and exporters in the world. Concerns over the use of antibiotics and the safety of the food has raised concerns among Western regulators, causing Chinese firms to use transshipment techniques to avoid certain tariffs and import inspections.

China Challenges the Giants With Low Fares

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's state-owned airlines are adding international routes and gaining marketshare from international competitors. Part of the reason behind their success is price-based competition that allows customers to save hundreds of dollars compared to other large international competitors. But the growth is also attributable to an increasing number of Chinese customers who may favor domestic over foreign carriers.

A Cash Crackdown Hits Gold Pawners

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

India remains the world’s second-largest gold consumer after China; it now has more than 20,000 tons of the precious metal. India’s government wants the economy to be less reliant on cash and especially gold, which many Indians use to store their wealth. Gold is seen as the poor man’s credit card, and Indians struggle to find valid currency to repay their loans.

Will Boeing Become Collateral Damage?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The Trump administration plans to combat trade imbalances by creating tariffs against trade partners, especially China. The tariffs could invoke a trade war, with U.S. airplane manufacturer Boeing being caught in the middle. Is this a fight where Boeing has any chance of not losing?

American Producers See an Election Boost

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

American steel producers are optimistic about the future growth in the U.S. steel industry after Donald Trump’s presidential election victory. Throughout his campaign, President-elect Trump vowed to commit a substantial amount of money and resources into rebuilding America’s infrastructure, as well as revising trade agreements with China that promote domestic production on steel.

China's High-End Retail Emporium

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Over the past two years, Walmart has repositioned the 14 Sam's Club stores in China to offer more expensive products. The focus is on "aspirational customers," or those who want to show off their wealth. Flat-screen TVs, BMWs and fine wines are on display.

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine’s Agriculture

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Ukraine’s black earth could make the country a world leader in agriculture, but the country still suffers for a lack of finance and infrastructure. If Ukraine could settle its conflict with Russia over Crimea, foreign investors would have more confidence investing in the country.

Como se dice 'Uber'?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After ceding China, Uber, the ride-hailing giant, plans to double its presence in Latin America by the end of 2017. As long as Uber’s competitors there try to make money on each ride, the region will remain far more affordable for Uber than India or China.

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine's Agriculture

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A good climate and great soil has contributed to the success of Ukrainian farmers in the global food market. Current projections suggest that Ukraine will rise to third place in world agricultural production, following United States and Brazil. But outdated technology and uncertain land use regulations are holding back some of the capital investment required to expand agricultural production in Ukraine.

Out-Ubering Uber

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

At the time Cheng Wei and colleagues were starting the Didi ride-hailing service in China, they faced a number of domestic competitors. Their model, unlike Uber, was based on the U.K.'s Hailo. After beating out their Chinese competitors, they recently reached an agreement with Uber.

Fierce Culture Drives Tencent’s Success

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Although Tencent Holdings is now one of China’s largest public companies, it maintains a start-up mentality and uses internal competition to spur innovation. Employees at all levels compete against each other to win funding for projects. In this competitive culture, ideas often come from the bottom up, and the company’s executives actively engage with rank and file employees.

Fierce Culture Drives Tencent’s Success

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Tencent Holdings is trying to keep up with the ongoing structural shift in China’s advertising market with its push into live video apps. Apps such as Twitter’s Periscope and Facebook are banned in China.

America Still Makes Things but Sometimes Needs Foreign Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While there have been shifts in manufacturing over the past few decades, there are still opportunities for manufacturing to thrive in developed countries such as the United States. Globalfoundries' facility in New York makes semiconductor wafers and employs 3,000 people with an average salary of $92,000. 9to5 Seating, a Calilfornia-based chair manufacturer, exports quality components from its U.S. factory to China, where assembled chairs are then sold in markets such as Saudi Arabia and China.

Thinking Inside The Box

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Ad Magic has become the go-to maker for Kickstarter games. Ad Magic’s revenue has quadrupled since the company was hired to produce the popular Cards Against Humanity.

Asia Is a Growth Market For Military Aircraft

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign sales are becoming increasingly important to U.S.-based defense contractors. Many Asian countries are ramping up their defense spending, while U.S. defense spending on new systems remains relatively flat. As part of a proposal to win sales in India, Lockheed-Martin and Boeing have both indicated that they will manufacture fighter jets in India rather than simply exporting them from the U.S.

Peak Cheap in China

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

After burning billions of investor dollars to attract users and grow market share, mergers and acquisitions among China’s on-demand service providers promise to create dominant players and bring profits. The question is will Chinese users continue to call without the steep discounts.

Is the U.S. Missing the TPP Train?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership has competition from the Chinese-led Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Both agreements have their boosters and detractors. The conflict illustrates how economics and politics are globally intertwined and are on the political front burner this election year.

China's City Dwellers Learn to Love Pickups

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Pickup trucks have been banned in most Chinese cities in order to lessen congestion and air pollution. Relegated to use in rural areas and on farms, sales of pickup trucks have been limited. Domestic manufacturers Great Wall Motors and Jiangling Motors have dominated the market, with limited imports from Ford and Toyota. A recent loosening of regulations, however, may be good news for foreign truck manufacturers.

China's Factory Workers Head Home

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

For many years, foreign multinationals have been attracted to China's coastal region, setting up factories to take advantage of low labor costs. Within China, this has led to a migration of young people from rural interior areas to the coastal regions, as they seek income while sending some money home to support their family. This migration has slowed significantly in recent years, as economic development in rural China has created opportunities for some migrants to return home and others to never leave.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Patent Police

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Asia is getting its own patent police. Government-backed firms seek fees in the United States and elsewhere. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tech companies are starting to use their patent stores more aggressively against rivals.

The Great Sea Turtle Migration

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Around a third of foreign students studying in U.S. universities are Chinese, and after graduation many take a job working in the U.S., but after a few years, some return home to help create technologies and companies in China. In Chinese, these professionals are referred to as hai gui, or "sea turtles" that come come home after a long journey.

Disney’s New Cultural Revolution

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Human resource management issues can challenge companies undergoing international expansion; Disney's experiences in China are one example. The company's theme parks depend on character-based entertainment, and in opening its Shanghai resort, talent development has been one of the biggest challenges the Disney has faced. Because there is a limited pool of talent trained in Western performing arts, Disney has needed to be innovative and make substantial investments to recruit and train performers. As competitors plan to open theme parks in China, Disney’s next challenge will be to retain the performers it has trained.

Disney's New Cultural Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In preparation for its Shanghai Disneyland theme park, Disney began working with arts institutes in China to build awareness and interest in performing at the park. Part of the challenge was to develop talented performers who could sing in the style of Disney show tunes, such as those in The Lion King. Another part of the challenge was to better understand how Disney productions could be modified to be more interesting to Chinese audiences. In a separate program, Disney launched English language training programs aimed at children two through twelve, with a curriculum that uses Disney characters.

German Engineering for Chinese Wannabes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Germany's Borgward auto company was founded in 1924 and at one point was responsible for 60 percent of the country's auto exports. By 1961, however, it had gone out of business. Now the brand is being revived in China, with a Borgward SUV being manufactured by Chinese truck-maker, Beiqi Foton.

An East German Challenge to the Swiss

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Last year, watch exports from Germany rose 14 percent, while Swiss watch exports fell 3 percent. Part of the difference in magnitude is driven by the significantly smaller size of the German watchmaking industry, but underlying economics help explain the trends. As the euro has fallen in value relative to the Swiss franc, German watches are relatively more affordable.

Can Lincoln and Caddy Find Fans in China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is the world's largest car market, and the luxury segment is growing quickly. While Mercedes, BMW, and Audi have done well in capturing market share, other competitors are trying to pick up a portion of this lucrative market. In January, General Motors opened a Cadillac plant in Shanghai, which will help it avoid import taxes of about 25 percent. Ford is also opening specialized showrooms for its Lincoln brand, offering the same level of customer service as a five-star hotel.

Samsung and LG Have A Battery Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Samsung and LG have been successful selling NCM batteries (nickel, cobalt, and manganese) for electric vehicles in China, with much of that success related to generous subsidies the Chinese government has provided to electric buses. A goal in stimulating the use of electric buses is to decrease pollution in China's cities. The government will continue providing subsidies, but only to the less expensive LFP batteries (lithium-iron-phosphate), which are available from a number of Chinese suppliers.

A Strategy of Mutually Assured Destruction

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Jawbone, a maker of fitness trackers, sued its competitor, Fitbit, in California state court over patent infringement and theft of trade secrets. The issue is now also before the International Trade Commission, which could ban the imports of the fitness trackers.

Inside the Billion-Dollar Dig to America’s Biggest Copper Deposit

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Two leading companies in the mining industry are in a partnership to develop the largest copper mine in the United States. The copper is located at depths that make mining the ore very expensive and hazardous. But the profits based on anticipated yield could be huge.

Where Retirement Isn't Job One

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Brooks Brothers is regularly retaining workers who normally would have been forced out of employment years ago. While older employees tend to cost more, their experience and skills often make the investment in them worthwhile.

China Tries to Tackle Its Commodities Crisis

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The oversupply of many commodities in China has driven down related prices, impacting both local economies and global stock markets. In particular, steelmaking capacity in China keeps rising despite government pledges to cut production and end easy credit.

Amazon’s Plan to Take On UPS and Alibaba

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Amazon’s company documents describe a global delivery network. Amazon takes aim at another piece of the global e-commerce market set to top $1 trillion by 2020.

Deutsche Bank Investors Get a Scare

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Convertible contingent bonds (CoCos) have been a good investment up until recently. Unfortunately, problems Deutsche Bank is having with its CoCos have contributed to a large recent drop in their share price.

So Many Boats, So Little Cargo

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

As commodity prices continue to lag and China’s economy continues to struggle, shipbuilders, cargo companies, and port operators are facing financial hardships as they feel the squeeze from slowing business.

The World’s Favorite New Tax Haven Is the United States

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has the United States become a prime tax shelter destination?

The Iran Invasion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The multinational agreement regarding Iran's nuclear program has opened the door for many foreign firms to pursue business deals in Iran. Not only are many foreign business leaders visiting Iran, but on a recent trip to Europe, the country's president, Hassan Rouhani, closed deals with several European firms. Most American firms, however, still have significant restrictions on what they can do in Iran.

Haier Has Higher Ambitions

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Chinese appliance-maker Haier has become a major global competitor but, after fifteen years of trying, has yet to establish a strong position in the United States. Now it has acquired one by agreeing to pay $5.6 billion for GE’s appliance unit.

Facing a Price War, Uber Bets on Volume

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How is Uber’s income affected by the company's continued trend of lowering fare prices every January for the last three years?

Haier Has Higher Ambitions

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Haier, a China-based manufacturing firm, is buying General Electric's appliance business for $5.4 billion. While General Electric appliances are well known in United States, the company has done little to expand its appliance business internationally. Haier has made some inroads in the U.S. market and expanded in other markets both through growth and acquisitions. This acquisition will help Haier move from a small to significant player in the U.S. appliance market.

Who's Who and Who's Not at the WEF

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The theme for this year’s Davos conference is Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution—referring to the impact of technologies like artificial intelligence and robotics. But the guest list and discussion topics seem more focused on geopolitical concerns about China, the Middle East, and Russia.

Your Uber Driver Has a House to Show You

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Real estate agents turn to Uber-driving amid prolonged property slump. Cars for hire increased 51 percent in the first half of 2015.

The Simple Truth About China’s Market

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In an attempt to dampen the recent chaos in the Chinese stock market, new circuit-breaker rules were recently imposed that call for an all-day trading halt if shares drop 7 percent. Those rules have taken much of the blame for China’s latest market chaos, but government-encouraged speculation may be an even bigger problem.

An Unhappy New Year For Asia's Shipyards

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Asian shipbuilders have experienced canceled orders and a significant slowdown in new orders due to falling oil prices and slower growth in commodity demand from China.

Insuring the Toys of the Wealthy

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Writing insurance policies for the possessions of the 1 Percent is a $40 billion business. Privilege Underwriters Reciprocal Exchange, which specializes in insuring the ultrarich, has seen its business grow least 40 percent a year since 2006.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Nikesh Arora is putting SoftBank on a path to invest billions in startups over the next few years. He has also shown his confidence in this plan by investing hundreds of millions of dollars of his own money in SoftBank.

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

The soaring demand for fresh beef in China, in combination with the recent free-trade agreement between China and Australia, has led to live cattle being transported by air from Australia to mainland China.

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A new trade agreement between Australia and China has paved the way for additional trade. One development is the shipping of live cattle from Australia to China, where the cows are then slaughtered. Specialized containers have been developed to facilitate the shipping of cattle on Boeing 747 aircraft, which allows shipping to cities far from China's coast.

Data Drive: 50 Companies to Watch

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

For some companies, 2016 is shaping up to be a momentous year. Bloomberg analysts identified 50 companies that face unusual challenges or have standout products or technologies that make them worth watching in 2016.

China's Slowdown Won't Deter Apple

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China has been Apple's manufacturing base and sales growth engine for the past several years. Although growth in Chinese sales of all smartphones is slowing, Apple has seen its third-quarter sales double from 2014 to 2015. While such a high growth rate may not be sustainable, Apple will continue to view the Chinese market as an increasingly important source of revenue.

Smartphone Margins

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Apple claims 90 percent of the smartphone industry’s profits. Although other firms offer very competitive phones, so far they seem to be eroding one another's positions -- not Apple's.

Smartphone Margins

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

In the ultra-competitive smartphone manufacturing market, Apple gobbles up close to 90 percent of industry profits, while Samsung takes the majority of the rest. So why do the other manufacturers continue to compete?

Metal Meltdown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The prices of commodity metals, such as copper and aluminum, are driven by a combination of fluctuating demand and much less volatile, large-scale production that adjusts slowly. When the Chinese economy was booming in the earlier part of this century, it generated strong demand for metals, causing prices to substantially rise. Companies such as Glencore and Alcoa were incentivized to invest in new mines and processing facilities. This additional supply is now coming into the market just as Chinese demand is dropping, causing commodity prices to fall.

Farm to Face

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Mutant flowers sounds like a great start to a horror flick, but in this case it may well turn into a business bonanza for the founder of Farmacy.

In Japan, Mobile Money is an Also-Ran

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With all its interest in tech gadgets and automation, it's easy to think Japan would be on the forefront of mobile phone and Internet-based banking—but it isn't. In fact, Japan has one of the lower rates of mobile banking adoption in the world behind India and Nigeria. Japanese customers have a preference for cash, and visiting luxurious bank branches to access their cash.

In Africa, New Winners and Losers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While it is common to think of Africa as a continent poised for growth, the situation differs across many of its fifty-five countries. The falling price of oil has meant that oil-exporting countries (e.g., Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) are seeing much lower revenues. Meanwhile, countries that depended on minerals and other commodity sales to China have also seen growth slow. But both the Democratic Republic of Congo and Ethiopia are expected to have more than 8 percent GDP growth this year. As a result, there are still good investment opportunities in Africa, depending on the country and the sector of the economy.

Eros Would Love to Become India’s Netflix

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

One of Bollywood's biggest studios, Eros, is betting it can win the online streaming race. The idea is to use the Mumbai studio’s bulging catalog of more than 2,000 films and new, exclusive series to build a critical mass of devoted users before Netflix and Amazon plant their flags in the world’s second-most populous country.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Dairy farms around the world are suffering from declining milk prices. A combination of reduced Chinese demand for imported milk and Russia’s ban on EU, American, and Australian milk has left the global market awash with milk. As a result, global dairy prices are falling with no turnaround in sight.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

High prices for milk last year caused farmers in many countries to invest in increased production.This year, with markets slowing in China and trade tensions with Russia, global trade in dairy products is down. Hence, dairy farmers worldwide are in a tough financial bind.

Those Inflation Targets Keep Getting Harder to Hit

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Central banks have promised higher inflation is on its way. They say they can raise inflation to reach their targets, but interest rates at about zero won’t be any help.

Where the Internet Revolution Is Waiting to Happen

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Not everyone has access to the Internet. Fewer than 4 percent of homes in Cuba have online access.

The Contagion Out of China

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

On August 24, the DJIA fell almost 1,100 points when investors were panicked by a wave of stock selling that began in Shanghai. While U.S. markets rebounded somewhat over the next few days, it is now clear that China plays a major role in the health of the global economy. China still has a lot of strengths, but it is losing the trust of investors for the first time in several years.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

To Eclipse the U.S., China Needs to Stop Fighting Itself

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Since taking over as Chinese president in 2013, Xi Jinping has centralized power and set forth a series of bold economic reform policies to further modernize the country. However, with a weaker GDP outlook, the Chinese government is finding it difficult to adhere to its stated plans for economic reform.

Alibaba’s $105 Billion Wipeout

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Alibaba, China’s largest e-commerce operator, is spending $4.6 billion to purchase Suning Commerce Group Co. This is Chairman Jack Ma’s largest deal ever and part of the company’s push to reach millions of new customers in rural China and abroad through a bigger logistics network. Alibaba has lost more than $90 billion of market value since its shares peaked in November 2014.

The Plum China Posting That's Turned Sour

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As an expatriate, being assigned to lead sales in the largest and fastest-growing international market would seem like a good thing. For Citroen's Sabine Scheunert, the dream job has turned into a real challenge as China's auto market has cooled. The downturn has led to dealerships needing to offer significant discounts to move inventory, and Scheunert's challenge is amplified due to evolving consumer preferences.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Growth in China’s market of 400 million smartphone users has almost flattened, leaving manufacturers scrambling.The decline is particularly bad news for Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi, which has been dependent upon the rapidly growing domestic market.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The large smartphone companies have done well in recent years, with rising sales and profits. Part of the reason for their success is the growing market for smartphones in China. However, the smartphone market in China may be reaching saturation, with most consumers who want and can afford a smartphone already owning one.

A Chinese Lender Bets on East Coast Golf

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

South Carolina's Grand Strand is dotted with golf courses, condos, and resorts. After some recent acquisitions, China-based Yiqian Funding now owns 22 of the golf courses and is adding to its real estate holdings. Yiqian's goals include increasing the number of Chinese tourists, and potential condo owners, to the area.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Disney is applying what it learned from the problems it had establishing a park France as it develops the $5.5 billion Shanghai Disneyland. The goal is to build something that is authentically Disney and distinctly Chinese. The demographics are quite different, and adult visitors may outnumber kids four to one. Will Disney’s largest foreign investment to date pay off?

Who Blew Up China’s Bubble?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The Chinese stock market bubble has finally burst after a meltdown vaporized $3.5 trillion in share value. The market rout is the worst mainland market slump since 1992 and is a major embarssment to Chairman Xi and his government. So far the steps taken by the government to reflate the bubble it had a big role in creating have had little impact.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Saying it has learned from experience in Paris and Hong Kong, Disney has gone to much greater lengths to tailor its new park in Shanghai to Chinese culture and society. Yet retaining an authentic Disney experience may be key to succeeding in China’s increasingly competitive amusement-park industry.

It Turns Out Rare Earths Aren’t That Rare

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Rare-earth prices jumped as much as sixfold in 2011. However, they crashed soon after, leading to the bankruptcy of U.S. miner Molycorp. The rare-earths commodity bubble burst when their scarcity was short-lived.

Why China's Bid for Auto Self-Sufficiency May Fail

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese industrial policy has had local, government-controlled automakers work in joint ventures with foreign automakers. As a result, Volkswagen and General Motors have the largest market share in China, with local partners earning nice profits. Currently, however, the fastest growing Chinese automakers are local private companies focused on the domestic market.

Wal-Mart Has Found a New Discount: Its Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Wal-Mart reduced its tax burden in recent years?

Startups See Dollars in China's Young and Lonely

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Seeking romance and love in modern day China. There has to be an app for that. Or two or three.

The Rise of the National Trading House

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

More countries are starting or purchasing trading companies to help serve national interests for the export or import of commodities.

Porsche's Buyers in China are Downshifting

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Porsche is expecting China to become its largest market this year, but customers are starting to choose slightly cheaper models.

A Chinese Phone Aimed at Hipsters

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

New startup OnePlus' business relies on word of mouth abroad.

China Does an About-Face on GMOs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To cut back on imports and boost domestic agricultural productivity, China is opening up to more GMOs.

McDonald’s Revamp Has Missing Ingredients

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has McDonald’s decided to respond to a decline in share price?

Lessons From China's Counterfeit Crackdown

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese online retailers take steps to curb the sales of counterfeit goods on their websites.

U.S. Carmakers Take Different Roads In Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Two competitors, two different strategies in Russia.

The Chinese Can’t Kick Their Savings Habit

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Some Chinese bank as much as half of their income, suppressing spending.

China Won’t Let Toyota Ditch Its Electric Cars

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

China may be the new California as its policies drive automakers to produce EVs.

China Won't Let Toyota Ditch Its Electric Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While Toyota bets on hydrogen over electric power for autos, in China it is selling electric cars to win favor with the government.

On the Java Sea, a New Shenzhen is Born

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As labor costs rise in China, Indonesia tries to attract manufacturers.

Drone Makers Seek Traffic Control

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Commercial drones are still mostly illegal in the U.S., but the industry and NASA are working to keep them from colliding.

For Apple, Only Time Will Tell In China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China may prove to the big market for Apple's most expensive watches.

One Hot List You Don't Want to Be On

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A U.S. government report names names in the business of fakes.

The Hunt for China’s Real Growth Numbers

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Economists using a “Li Index” find GDP growth is 5 percent.

Intel Buys Its Way Deeper Into China

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Intel is spending billions in China in an effort to catch up with dominant mobile chipmaker Qualcomm.

Intel Buys Its Way Deeper Into China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The company is spending billions on factories and state-owned rivals.

The NBA’s Hoop Dream: World Domination

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

About 300 million Chinese play basketball, and the NBA hopes to use that fan base to someday eclipse soccer’s popularity. With that dream be realized?

It's Raining Cars in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The booming market for autos in China has caused automakers to expand capacity faster than the demand warrants.

Everyone's Playing Dots, Except The Chinese

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mobile phone gamers worldwide play Dots and TwoDots, but the company has had difficulty cracking the world's biggest mobile gaming market: China.

Why Brands Love China's Sex And The City

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Western brands vie for product placement on China's hit shows, and often don't even have to pay for the publicity.

Why Brands Love China’s Sex And The City

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The Tiny Times movies have pulled in $208 million at the box office, making them attractive for promoting luxury brands to an affluent and young Chinese market.

China's Streaming Fans Face a Long Wait

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

How will China's new censorship policy affect video sites?

Xiaomi Puts a Windfall to Work Beyond Phones

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Xiaomi, which raised $1.1 billion in December, is pouring money into its own investments.

China Dealerships Flex Their Muscles

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese car dealerships battle with car makers over growth and margins.

Graduates of The Revolution

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Chinese companies are Increasing their investment in factories to facilitate Japanese-style productivity.

China is Losing Some of Its Appetite for Coal

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

China’s consumption of coal is likely to peak by 2020 but it appears coal will remain the primary source of electricity for the foreseeable future.

The Startup Winning Over China's Gays

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Dating app Blued and its backers are targeting an affluent minority.

China is Losing Some of Its Appetite for Coal

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Renewable energy is starting to make a difference.

The World's Biggest Car Company Wants to Get Rid of Gasoline

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Will electric vehicles become a thing of the past? Toyota has a vision that its hydrogen vehicle will become the first mass-market hydrogen car.

Outsourcing: Loss of U.S. Manufacturing Jobs Picked Up Speed

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcing has been taking place for longer than most U.S. college students have been alive.

In India, Amazon and Its Rivals Tread Lightly

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Merchants say e-commerce companies in India, flush with foreign capital, are violating rules meant to protect locals.

Uber Alles

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Uber is using its $17 billion valuation to raise capital and finance rapid growth internationally.

India vs. China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India is becoming increasingly attractive to manufacturers, although it is still in need of infrastructure improvements.

India vs. China

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The battle for global manufacturing heats up.

The Treasury Market Fails a Stress Test

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With demand for Treasuries soaring and supplies shrinking, volatility in the market is at an all-time high. If the events of October 15 were a stress test for the market's ability to maintain stability in a crisis, it failed.

The Coming Year Of the Bear?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Prominent economists clash over China’s future.

The Latest Rate Dip Spurs a Refinance Rush

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Demand for mortgage refinancing is soaring after 30-year mortgage rates drop below 4 percent, but they won't stay there very long.

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Once the market leader in both China and India, Samsung phones are losing marketshare to cheaper models.

Samsung’s China Problems Come to India

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cheaper smartphones eat away at the South Korean company's lead.

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Samsung is losing ground to a wave of Chinese and local smartphone upstarts in India, where it has led for years.

Why the Strong Dollar is Messing Things Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The strength of the U.S. dollar is a burden for developing countries dependent on imported commodities.

Marchionne's Last Lap

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne has big plans to gain a position among the small number of large global automakers.

China's New Export: Military in a Box

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's exports of military equipment are growing, as it provides easy-to-use, inexpensive arms to developing countries.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

As the Chinese buy less coal and iron ore from Australia, the country can rely more on farming and tourism.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Australian exports of coal and minerals to China are falling, while exports of beef are rising.

Australia Reinvents Itself

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

China’s economic slump crushes demand for iron ore and coal.

Power Loss in Japan

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Three years after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that caused radiation leaks from the Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex, the economic impact continues. As of September 2013, Japan is without nuclear power.

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What regulatory environment do foreign corporations face in China, and how might this affect their future profitability?

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Direct investment in China is down, as foreign companies face increased scrutiny from the Chinese government.

In China, It's Meet Me at Tmall

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Go East, young man, go East! There is health in e-tailing.

Made in Memphis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising transportation costs and wage rates in China are causing firms to relocate manufacturing to the Southeast U.S.

Made in Memphis

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Manufacturing is slowly returning to the U.S. -- and much of the action is in the South.

Made in Memphis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How have tax incentives and labor costs affected the location of new manufacturing plants in the South?

Apple's First Responders

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

When Apple unveils its new iPhone, its early field failure analysis team will be ready to quickly diagnose any problems.

The Ninja Turtles Save Summer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hollywood is suffering from overcrowding during its key season.

Shhh … Luxury Goods Are Discounted in China

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Chinese consumers buy a third of all luxury goods globally. A crackdown on gift-giving has slowed such sales.

High-End Motorcycles Meet India's Mopeds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India’s largest maker of two-wheeled vehicles is investing $25 million in Erik Buell’s latest bike venture.

Porsche for Her

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

The Macan is Porsche’s newest product. Is the smaller SUV going to taint the brand or replicate the success of the Cayenne for the legacy automaker?

Building the Whole Foods of China

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

In China, eating healthy is a lifestyle of success.

The Chinese TV Maker Taking Aim at Sony

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hisense is moving up in worldwide market share of television sets and is challenging Sony for the #3 position.

Xiaomi Takes Direct Aim at the iPhone

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Xiaomi's smartphones emphasize technology over marketing, and are making inroads in Asian markets.

Turning Ethiopia Into China’s China

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Ethiopians make $40 a month stitching shoes. Their Chinese counterparts make more than $400.

Turning Ethiopia Into China's China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Labor costs in Ethiopia are approximately 10 percent of those in China, causing some Chinese companies to shift production to Africa.

In China, Office Work Can be Deadly

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

According to official Chinese media, about 600,000 Chinese die every year from working too hard.

The Maker Movement Gains Ground in China

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Inventors and tinkerers are gathering with government support.

Think Old.

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Volvo owner Zhejiang Geely is investing $11 billion to revive Volvo’s popularity, especially in the U.S. where sales fell 55 percent in the past decade.

America’s Got Milk And China Wants It

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

U.S. dairy exports set records with growing global demand.

America's Got Milk and China Wants It

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Growing middle-class populations have exploded global demand for dairy products and given U.S. dairy farmers their best performance in decades.

America's Got Milk and China Wants It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Strong international demand is pushing up global milk prices, creating an opportunity for U.S. dairy farmers.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Love Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the current state of the market for cruise lines in Asia, and how will it change in the future?

Modesty is the New Abercrombie

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Abercrombie is hoping to bring back teens who’ve left the mall and are shopping with their smartphones.

A Drone Simple Enough for Anyone to Use

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

DJI’s early lead in the drone industry may put it at the center of the debate over regulation and privacy.

Are You Done With That? How Lenovo Makes Fat Profits on Slim Pickings

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Lenovo achieved growth and profits in the mature PC business and is positioning to do the same in mobile phones and tablets.

Why Oil Prices Haven't Gone Crazy

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

As political chaos and violence around the world keep millions of barrels of daily oil production off the market, increased production in the United States and Canada have put a temporary lid on prices and volatility.

Are You Done With That? How Lenovo Makes Fat Profits on Slim Pickings

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Lenovo been able to increase profit with other corporations’ castoffs?

Why Oil Prices Haven’t Gone Crazy

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The U.S. shale oil boom has kept markets calm.

China's Pollution Police Are Watching

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With only three of the seventy-four Chinese cities monitored last year having acceptable air quality, China is facing a national crisis with air pollution.

For Expats in China: Smog Perks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Expatriates considering a move to China are demanding more hardship pay to deal with air pollution.

I’ll Pass

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Convertibles, long a symbol of fun and freedom, are going the way of the Model T.

Keeping the Mystery Out of China's Meat

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Sourcing food products in China, the Wild West of food safety, is both costly and risky for Western companies such as Wal-Mart, Nestle, and Carrefour.

Keeping the Mystery Out of China's Meat

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With 500,000 food production and processing companies, China has become the Wild West of food safety.

Keeping the Mystery Out of China's Meat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While China does have strict food safety rules, it is often up foreign multinational firms to make sure that local suppliers follow the rules.

Australia Is Immune To China’s Flu

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Construction and employment in Australia are rebounding, aided by rate cuts.

Keeping the Mystery Out of China's Meat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Western companies police the safety of China's food supply.

This "Baby" Jeep Has An Italian Accent

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The new Jeep Renegade represents the potential of the merged Fiat and Chrysler to efficiently launch a global product.

It Costs $13 Billion to Court Macau's High Rollers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Foreign gaming companies in Macau are trying to develop direct relationships with Chinese high rollers and avoid the costly middle men.

Born-in-the-USA Luxury Gains in China

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China now accounts for more 25 percent of global luxury spending for U.S. brands, and U.S. sales are growing faster in China than pricier European luxury lines.

Born-in-the-USA Luxury Gains in China

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

U.S. brands such as Coach, which sells bags for less than $400, are growing faster in China than pricier European luxe lines.

French Beret Makers: Then There Was One

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The last French beret maker expects to make almost 200,000 this year. France used to produce millions.

Nissan Moves to the Back of the Pack

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

In two years, Nissan has gone from having the highest to lowest profit margins of any Japanese automaker.

A Chinese Scandal Could Stall Nu Skin's Growth

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Nu Skin Enterprises, a maker of anti-aging skin products, has been criticized in the Chinese press for its sales and marketing practices.

Putin's Olympic Fiasco

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The amount of corruption associated with the record $51 billion spent on the Sochi Olympic Games has been unprecedented. Where is this corruption occurring, and will the games be affected?

A Plant Manager Adapts to a Changed China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's rising labor costs drive multinational firms to shift production priorities at Chinese factories.

Apple's Asia Breakthrough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Apple is poised for growth in Japan and China.

Wal-Mart’s New Chief Faces Old Woes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for Wal-Mart now that Doug McMillon has taken over?

Bad Loans Could Spark an Emerging-Markets Crisis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for the debt of emerging-markets corporations?

In China, Dell Clings Tightly to the Waning PC

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

As part of its turnaround strategy, Dell is opening thousands of new stores in China where PC sales are in decline. How does that work?

In China, Dell Clings Tightly to the Waning PC

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Dell is pursing retail sales, and opening up stores, to build market share in China.

Hell to Pay

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The major banks are finally being forced to pay for some of their actions during and before the financial crisis. What are the effects on the banks going to be in the months ahead?

Chinese Rage at the Pension System

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

China's pension system seems to be suffering from the same ailment as the U.S. social security system, and raising the retirement age is as popular an idea there as it is in the United States.

Saving Elephants with Google Earth

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Drones are helping keep Kenyan elephants away from poachers. They can’t help with Kenya’s booming population.

What a Pig Demon Says About Chinese Cinema

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Hollywood may have to embrace pig demons and Chinese language if it wants a bigger piece of China’s large and rapidly growing movie market.

Card Companies Try To Conquer Myanmar

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Using plastic to pay at retailers is growing, but still a novelty in Myanmar.

An Ugly Dilemma for Beauty Companies

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Chinese regulations mandating animal testing for cosmetic products are forcing cosmetic companies to make difficult choices between economic and social responsibility interests.

An Ugly Dilemma for Beauty Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In China, regulations require certain products to undergo testing on animals before being approved for human use, while in the EU some of these same products would be banned if animal testing was used.

Dirty Honey

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Two executives of Hamburg-based ALW Food Group plead guilty to fraud in connection with illegal imports of honey from China.

China Turns the Screws on Multinationals

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

After years of looking at foreign companies as sources of capital, technology, and managerial know-how, China appears to be specifically targeting European and U.S. multinational companies in a crackdown on anti-competitive behavior.

China Turns the Screws on Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The Chinese government is going after more foreign multinationals for violations of Chinese laws.

Big Waste Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Scrap wire and metal from the U.S. are being shipped to China for recycling and reuse.

A Chinese Software Maker in a Texas State of Mind

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

NQ Mobile has two corporate headquarters (Dallas, USA, and Bejing, China) and two CEOs.

This Great Wall is Built on SUVs

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Analysts believe Chinese automakers are about a decade away from delivering their first globally competitive vehicle. Great Wall may be the company to pull it off.

Asia's Bitter Harvest

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The market for palm oil is expanding, but human rights abuses are rampant in this industry.

World of Warcraft No Longer Rules in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Activision Blizzard's stock is up 40 percent this year, but its top game is losing market share in one of its largest markets: China.

Crocs Wants You To Forget About Its Crocs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Crocs is looking at a new image and international growth to spur sales.

China Sends a Message to Banks: Oh, Grow Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The central bank signals that the days of easy money and no oversight are ending.

Companies in China Seek Ways To Cut Costs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising wages are impacting the economics of production in China.

Companies in China Seek Ways to Cut Costs

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

If you move inland, it’s not really saving you costs.

Premier Li Wants More Chinese in the Cities

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

China Premier Li Keqiang plans to turn millions of farmers into urbanites.

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

Where's the Colonel When You Need Him?

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

At its Chinese restaurants, KFC’s “finger lickin’ good” eats offer more local dishes, such as chili black fungus and fishball soup, undermining its American identity.

Where's the Colonel When You Need Him?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Will localization be the strategy that helps KFC maintain its dominant position as a fast food giant in China?

The Next Crisis for China Lurks in the Shadows

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Some $5.86 trillion in unsupervised lending hangs over the Chinese economy.

Where's the Colonel When You Need Him?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

KFC, China's largest fast food chain, has seen revenue fall as consumers became concerned about the spread of bird flu.

Mercedes Keeps Its Eyes on the Back Seat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Since Chinese owners of many Mercedes S-Class sedans ride in the back seat, the company has redesigned the passenger compartment for the market.

The Paradox of Bangladesh

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh brings attention to a huge export industry that's helping Bangladeshi citizens out of poverty - with pay under $50 a month.

China's Latest Illegal Import: Baby Formula

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Concerns about local baby formula in China drive demand for illegally imported baby formula.

In Some Chinese Cities, the Tags Cost More Than the Car

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Even after significant government push, not one of the top 10 automobile brands sold in the People's Republic of China is Chinese. There are a number of forces in place that will make it difficult for local brands to gain ground in the near term.

The Promise and Peril Of China’s Shale Gas

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Shale-gas reserves in China far surpass America’s. Getting it out is the problem.

The Euro Zone Loses Its Raison D’Etre

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Foreign ownership of debt in euro-area countries is dropping.

The Merger Boom That Fizzled

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The value of global takeover and merger announcements in March was the lowest since July 2009. Why do some think a sharp rebound is coming soon?

L'Oreal Puts On a Happy Face in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By tailoring products to the local market, including use of traditional ingredients, L'Oreal is boosting sales in China.

China's Journey from Imitator to Innovator

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

You make the call. Are China's Internet companies imitators or innovators?

Lured From Retirement To Save Fiat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Lorenzo Ramaciotti has a challenge in balancing consistency across brands with creating unique identities for Fiat's wide range of vehicles worldwide.

China's Legions of 'Housing Slaves'

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

In China's affluent cities, it's not uncommon for people to spend 40 times their annual income on a home.

Will China Get a Kick From Champagne?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese consumers have embraced cognac and Champagne as symbols of westernization and conspicuous consumption.

Things Fall Apart. IBM Is Here to Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Africa presents many opportunities for IBM, while also carrying risks.

A Portrait of a Chinese Hacker

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Corporations like Dell employ malware experts to protect corporate economic interests, but society also benefits.

Chinese Workers...In Greenland?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mining opportunities in Greenland are attracting Chinese companies and workers.

The Kids Decoding the World

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Chinese genome mapping company BGI is much more than a low-cost outsourcing partner.

Hacked? Who Ya Gonna Call?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Could your business be the target of a hacker attack?

Hacked? Who Ya Gonna Call?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Could your firm be the target of a high-end cyber-espionage operation?

Battered in China, Japan Inc. Seeks Refuge

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japanese auto companies are finding Thailand more friendly than China.

Fingers Crossed In the Alps

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Davos attendees hope signs of a recovery don’t vanish in the mist.

China's Unsafe Water Is Nestlé's Opportunity

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With Nestle's SOM in the bottled water business slipping in Europe, the United States, and Australia, the company sees China as a huge opportunity. Because more than seventy percent of lakes and rivers in China are polluted, Nestle is positioning itself to take advantage of a boom in bottled water sales.

China's Unsafe Water Is Nestle's Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sales of bottled water in China are strong, as consumers question drinking tap water.

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

China’s Smartphone Market Welcomes Dumbphones

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China is now the world’s largest smartphone market and home to Lenovo, the world’s biggest PC vendor. In 2013, Lenovo is working to get every phone sale possible. Look out Apple?

Charlie Rose Talks to Kenneth Rogoff

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Kenneth Rogoff has found that debt levels of 90-100% of GDP for a country will slow the country’s future GDP growth. Does he think the United States is going the way of Greece or Japan?

When It Doesn’t Have to Be There Overnight

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Once a rail link is in timely use, it can be just as fast as air and almost as cheap as sea transportation, right?

The People's Republic of Plastic

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's UnionPay has quickly become number two in the worldwide debit card market.

Xi Jinping Acts Like He Runs the Place

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Even before assuming the presidency in China, Xi Jinping has signaled he’ll be aggressive about reforms.

Manufacturing: A Rebound, Not a Renaissance

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

What is the current state of manufacturing in the U.S.?

Is the Party Over for Uggs?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Sales of Uggs footwear fell 12 percent in the third quarter of 2012. Can Decker Outdoor survive?

How Many CEOs Does it Take to Change a &$^#%! Light Bulb?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

After leaving Seagate in a heated dispute about technology direction, CEO Bill Watkins is now passionately leading Bridgelux to make LED the dominant technology in lighting. This bet could pay off big for Bridgelux -- or not.

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The most populous country in the world will soon see its huge labor force begin to shrink. The current fast track toward industry automation may be the key to continued wage increases and moving Chinese manufacturing companies up the value chain.

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China is adding lots of robots to its manufacturing production lines. That's good for its competitiveness and productivity, not so good for the displaced workers.

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising wages and anticipated labor shortages are leading many manufacturers in China to invest in robots and automation.

China's Green Strategy Is Awash in Red Ink

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is China following the U.S. administration's attempts to subsidize green energy sources? If so, what are the results so far in the Middle Kingdom?

For Oil, Coal, and Gas, Is Obama Friend or Foe?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is Obama now going for a "full-throated" endorsement of oil and natural gas production in the United States? Meanwhile, does an EPA-led "war on coal" continue?

Swiss Re and Roche Team Up In China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Roche and Swiss Re team up with local insurers to provide cancer insurance and treatment in China.

Corporate China's Black Hole of Debt

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

While many economic indicators in China are improving, one figure is going the wrong direction: corporate debt.

The Hamburger Robot Will Serve You Now

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Lemnos Labs, a startup incubator, is focusing exclusively on hardware.

Confucius Makes a Comeback in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As China tries to balance open markets with government control, some of its citizens look to inspiration from the writings of Confucius.

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cost cutting at AB InBev has recently caused profits to climb, but sales have suffered. Is the attempt to cut costs affecting the taste of the beers AB InBev brews?

Masayoshi Son's Big Foreign Adventure

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A slow growth and aging market in Japan leads SoftBank to look internationally for investment opportunities.

GoPro Widens the View of Its Customer Base

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

GoPro has begun to grow outside its niche in action sports. But can it build a broader differentiated position in video cameras with competitors like Sony moving in?

Made in USA Still Sells

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Regardless of the huge U.S. trade deficit, Made in U.S.A. still has great value overseas.

Made in USA Still Sells

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

For products and services linked to positive American attributes (e.g., technology, Hollywood, fast food, etc), American-sounding names help products sell in developing countries.

The Gap between Rich and Poor Widens

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

What do income equality metrics suggest about U.S. business and society?

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

Alibaba Starts to Weed Out the Fakes

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The Alibaba Group, which owns China’s largest e-commerce sites, says it is working to stop the infringement of U.S. trademarks and copyrights through its websites.

So long, Beijing. Hello, Changsha!

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China's second-tier cities are said to be important engines of world economic growth in the near future

Alibaba Starts to Weed Out the Fakes

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Alibaba's CEO is trying to reduce intellectual property theft.

Smarter Robots, With No Wage Demands

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Robotics could be the key to major productivity increases needed to help retain American business that could otherwise migrate overseas. Boston-based Rethink says they have the robot for the job.

Not Worth It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Expatriates in China begin to wonder whether it is time to leave.

Not Worth It

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Despite China's strong economic growth, working there doesn't appeal to all expats, and some are leaving. Why?

China Slows, Australia Freezes

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Australia has benefited greatly from China's economic boom, but now may also suffer the consequences of its slowing economy.

A Rainmaker For the Small Fry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

An ex-ambassador uses online retailing to help small companies enter the Chinese consumer market.

China Slows, Australia Freezes

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is Australia's economic pain more evidence of China's importance in the world economy?

China's Plans for Its Own Car Brand Stall

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Developing indigenous Chinese car brands for the largest car market in the world is proving to be a long, hard battle.

China's Plans for Its Own Car Brands Stall

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Joint ventures with foreign firms have helped spur sales by Chinese automakers, but domestic brands have not fared well.

China's Plans for Its Own Car Brands Stall

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

For some reason, Chinese auto buyers prefer foreign brands, confounding state planners.

At Abercrombie & Fitch, Sex No Longer Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Abercrombie & Fitch appears to have lost its retail edge and will close 180 stores through 2015. Does sex no longer sell?

Foxconn: Progress on Factory Conditions

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Working conditions at Foxconn, Apple's main supplier, are reportedly getting better.

The People's Republic of Discounting

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Slowing economic growth is causing retailers to drop prices in order to generate revenue growth.

Innovator Tony Leonard: A Cleaner Way to Dye

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

ColorZen hopes to lessen the environmental impacts of the textile-dyeing process.

China is Really Big. Its Brands, Not so Much.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's biggest brands look to Western markets for higher profits.

Chinese Stocks Say Farewell to the U.S.

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

A handfull of debacles has put the breaks on a wave of reverse mergers into the U.S. markets by Chinese companies. Indeed, the trend is in full retreat.

Getting Chinese Kids to School in One Piece

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. companies hope to make inroads into the school bus market in China, where it is predicted that 50,000 new school buses will be purchased a year through 2015.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei has moved up from number seven worldwide in the smartphone market to perhaps number three.

China Struggles to Publish Accurate Data

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The government moves to shed its reliance on local officials.

For China, Too Much Steel Isn't Enough

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

To combat a slack economy, China is building mills it does not need

Obama to China: Dump the Car Tariffs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

President Obama wants China to reduce its tariffs on imports of U.S.-made autos. What should operations managers do?

P&G Woos the Hearts, Minds, and Schools of Vietnam

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Can extensive and intensive marketing make P&G the market leader in Vietnam?

For Beijing, Too Much Steel Isn't Enough

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

To combat a slack economy, China is building steel mills it does not need.

Made in China? Not Worth the Trouble

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Many smaller U.S.-based companies are finding that it may be less costly to produce in the U.S. versus China.

Made in China? Not Worth the Trouble

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Some small U.S. manufacturers are bringing their factory operations back to the U.S.

Made in China? Not Worth the Trouble

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Is this the beginning of a major shift or just the retreat of the little guys?

Meet China's Master of the Markets

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The new chairman of China Securities Regulatory Commission is trying to modernize China

Meet China's Master of the Markets

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The new chairman of China Securities Regulatory Commission is trying to modernize China

Meet China's Master of the Markets

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The new chairman of China Securities Regulatory Commission is trying to modernize China

Europe's Latest Hardliners: German Automakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While French and Italian automakers are feeling the pain of Europe's economic slowdown (and want financial assistance), German automakers that have long emphasized export markets in North America and Asia don't believe they should be asked to help in a bailout.

Foreign Banks Hit a Wall in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

After spending $60 billion to build and buy franchises in China, global banks have earned about $10 billion there over the past decade.

China Mobile Profits From the Google Void

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Google's decision to exit mainland China in 2010 has given China Mobile the opportunity to dominate the market for Android-based apps.

Mapping the Way to a Global Free-Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The more nations involved in trade-liberalizing negotiations, the harder it is to get things accomplished.

Understanding the China Slowdown

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China's economic growth is slowing down - what's an operations manager to do?

China Eyes Japan as the Land of Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese companies are looking to build their reputation, and their quality, by capturing market share in Japan.

China's Soccer Moms Want SUVs, Too

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Growing middle-class prosperity in China is making SUVs an important segment for automakers.

China's Soccer Moms Want SUVs, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's growing affluence is sparking SUV sales.

Trouble for China's Foreign IPOs

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Are Chinese IPO stocks worth considering anymore?

Trouble for China's Foreign IPOs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Are Chinese IPO stocks worth considering anymore?

Trouble for China's Foreign IPOs

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Are Chinese IPO stocks worth considering anymore?

Want Some Milk With Your Green Tea Oreos?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Kraft Foods found global success with Oreos after adapting them to local tastes. Do globally standardized strategies still make sense?

A Vital Pakistan Industry Is Dangerously Fragile

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to power and gas shortages, textile shipments from Faisalabad, Pakistan are down 50 percent.

Foreign Beermakers Raise a Glass to China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign brewers operating in China are working to lure drinkers to pricier brands.

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China's exporters are starting to move toward higher-margin products in heavy industry. Can operations managers benefit?

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China shifts its export focus from shoes and t-shirts to heavy industry.

KFC's Big Game of Chicken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

KFC is growing quickly in emerging markets, but in the United States, franchisees are not happy with the attention they receive.

It's Not Paranoia if They're Stealing Your Secrets

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

There is growing evidence of intellectual property theft in China.

China May Finally Let Its People Go

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What would happen if China allowed labor mobility?

Miracle, Interrupted

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can India's economy emerge as a global superpower?

Miracle, Interrupted

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's economic miracle seems to be stalling, but just as the hype over success may have been overstated, the frequent references to demise may be also overstated.

Made in China Makes India Uneasy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China exports to India twice as much as India exports to China, stirring concerns that Indian industries face trade barriers in China.

In China, A New Meaning for Blood Circulation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Lab operator Kindstar provides laboratory services for China's growing medical market with U.S. financial backers, including the Mayo Clinic and Kleiner Perkins.

From Mao Jackets to Silk Suits

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A Chinese military uniform maker takes on European fashion houses.

Time to Head Home for Some Manufacturers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

More companies are assessing the full cost of outsourcing with an anti-business administration. This makes manufacturing in the U.S. look more competitive and is something for operations managers to consider.

China's Next Boss Comes to Meet the Debtors

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does capitalism hold for China's future?

Charlie Rose Talks to Gary Locke

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. Ambassador to China reflects on life and business in that country. How can operations managers benefit?

A Back Seat that Augurs China's Influence

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Automakers, after first developing specific design features for the Chinese market, are now exporting these vehicles from China to other markets.

'Made in Cambodia' - For Now

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's share of the developed world's textile imports is dropping as lower-wage competitors in Southeast Asia increase production.

China Forgets Inflation and Goes for Growth

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In a signal to Chinese banks to start lending, the central bank cuts reserve requirements, freeing up $55 billion. Is it time to shift more operations to China?

In China, Barbie's Reign May Be Short-Lived

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As China's toy market grows, manufacturers that used to emphasize exports now see opportunities at home.

The Italian Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

An influx of Chinese immigrants is transforming Italy's economy and sparking cultural backlash.

A False Brigade

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the emerging economies save Europe?

Would You Buy $1 Billion in China-Made, So-Controversial-It-Hurts, Telecom Equipment From This Guy?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei makes inexpensive switches and telecom equipment worldwide, but has had a hard time overcoming mistrust by the United States' government.

Would You Buy $1 Billion in China-Made, So-Controverisal-It-Hurts Telecom Equipment from this Guy?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Huawei faces an uphill battle convincing politicians that buying telecom equipment from this Chinese company doesn't put America's national security at risk.

Qualcomm Rewires for India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To make inroads in India's mobile phone market, Qualcomm is assisting domestic handset makers and operators, and buying 4G spectrum.

China is Ready for its Hollywood Close-up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hollywood studios are teaming up with Chinese film companies and creating roles for Chinese stars in order to help get films into Chinese theaters and work around rules that would otherwise limit studio revenue from Chinese audiences.

Africa's Powerful New Friends in China

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

No-strings-attached funding is facilitating Chinese companies' involvement in more than $9 billion of hydro projects in Africa. What will be the social, environmental and economic costs and benefits of these projects?

Yankee Chicken Go Home!

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would you move an oversupply of dark meat?

Big Pharma Launches a Talent Raid in China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Prescribing versus selling medicine: which pays more in China?

The Cheap China Gets A Lot More Volatile

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Inflation may be pushing Vietnamese workers to strike:336 times in the first four months of the year. What is the lesson for operations managers?

The Cheap China Gets A Lot More Volatile

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Inflation is causing more Vietnamese workers to strike, decreasing the attractiveness for foreign investors.

Can Alan Mulally Take Ford's Show on the Road?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

China is central to Ford's growth plans. The softness of the Chinese market, however, may make those goals hard to achieve.

Can Alan Mulally Take Ford's Show on the Road?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Alan Mulally is planning on a 50 percent production boost, and that depends largely on expansion in China and India.

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Procter & Gamble's new CEO plans to increase revenue by expanding sales of existing products rather than through acquisitions.

9 Ideas From Around the World to Fix the U.S. Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should we do to get the U.S. economy going again? Countries as diverse as Germany, Brazil, Singapore, and Thailand can offer ways for the U.S. to shore up its economy.

Even Santa's Worried About Chinese Inflation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Higher commodity prices and rising Chinese wage rates are being passed on to retailers in the U.S.

How 'bout Some Scotch With Your Green Tea?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hoping that younger Chinese will start to behave like Western consumers, liquor giant Diageo hypes Johnnie Walker in cognac-smitten China.

How 'bout Some Scotch With Your Green Tea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As China's market for luxury goods grows, Diageo is hoping Johnnie Walker whisky can take some of the market share currently held by cognac.

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

VW is spending $1 billion on a Tennessee factory to boost market share in the U.S. Could it eventually become the No. 1 global carmaker?

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

VW is spending $1 billion on a new factory in Tennessee under the theory that you can't be the number one auto company in the world if you are not successful in the United States.

Politicians Are Demonizing Big Oil. Time To Buy?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How much profit is too much profit? Robust oil industry profits have made energy stocks attractive, despite public anger over gas prices and the possible loss of tax breaks.

Politicians Are Demonizing Big Oil. Time To Buy?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How much profit is too much profit? Robust oil industry profits have made energy stocks attractive, despite public anger over gas prices and the possible loss of tax breaks.

Politicians Are Demonizing Big Oil. Time To Buy?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How much profit is too much profit? Robust oil industry profits have made energy stocks attractive, despite public anger over gas prices and the possible loss of tax breaks.

China's Power Outages Come Early and Often

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although the rates they can charge are regulated, the price of coal is not, putting Chinese power companies in a tough spot.

U.S. College Test Prep in China Is:

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

New Oriental is enjoying great success by preparing Chinese students to ace U.S. college admissions tests. It's profitable, but is it hurting its own customers as well as those competing against them for college admissions?

How to Beat the High Cost of Happy Workers

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

China's maker of iPhones and iPads raised wages and lowered suicides. But it also lost money. Now Foxconn is seeking cheaper labor.

A Wall Street Scion's Expensive Education

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How can you avoid a scam on the U.S. financial exchanges?

A Wall Street Scion's Expensive Education

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Companies that go public through reverse mergers can be hazardous, even for professional investors. So why did Jesse Glickenhaus make a losing investment in a mysterious Chinese company that got its Nasdaq listing through a reverse merger?

A Wall Street Scion's Expensive Education

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Companies that go public through reverse mergers can be hazardous, even for professional investors. So why did Jesse Glickenhaus make a losing investment in a mysterious Chinese company that got its Nasdaq listing through a reverse merger?

A Wall Street Scion's Expensive Education

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Companies that go public through reverse mergers can be hazardous, even for professional investors. So why did Jesse Glickenhaus make a losing investment in a mysterious Chinese company that got its Nasdaq listing through a reverse merger?

A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Higher wages in China and smarter factories in the U.S. may boost American manufacturing - if U.S. unions and big government don't get in the way.

Disney Gets a Second Chance in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By focusing more on local culture, Disney has high hopes for its new theme park near Shanghai.

The YouTube of China Goes Legit

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

The repairing of China's Youku means no more illegal downloading.

Economic Aftershocks

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How quickly will Japan and the world recover?

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

The Ruling Party Vows to Fix the Ruling Party

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Premier Wen Jiabao calls for a crackdown on the abuses of the Communist cadres. It may affect U.S. businesses with operations in China.

For Central Banks, a Chance to Get it Wrong

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will central banks raise rates enough to head off inflation?

Censorship: The Trade Barrier That Dare Not Speak Its Name

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Why do trade officials view China's blocking of Internet sites differently from the blocking of goods? Should WTO rules apply to both?

Global Inflation Starts with Chinese Workers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising wages in China will contribute to inflationary pressure on goods worldwide.

Foreign Carmakers Try Brands Just for China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Will sales of just-for-China auto brands cannibalize core brands?

Foreign Carmakers Try Brands Just for China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

GM, Honda, and others are reaching out to less affluent shoppers in China's interior with basic entry-level models.

Foreign Carmakers Try Brands Just for China

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

GM, Honda, and others are reaching out to less affluent shoppers in China's interior with basic entry-level models.

Stars and Stripes and Servers Forever

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Startup SeaMicro says it can compete with bigger rivals by selling efficient, low-power, made-in-America servers geared for Web work.

An Indian Tycoon Takes a Tumble

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With his company's shares in the dumps and the government on his tail, Anil Ambani will have to work to regain the faith of investors.

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In challenging Ambre Energy's plans for a coal export terminal, environmentalists are ignoring the economic growth it would bring.

All Fired Up Over Coal Exports to Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As U.S. electricity producers shift away from coal, coal producers are seeking export markets where there is less concern over carbon dioxide emissions.

A European Shadow on China's Solar Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As Chinese firms ramp up solar cell production, European governments are cutting back on subsidies.

HP Cancels the Board and the Beautiful

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Can an overhaul of Hewlett-Packard's board shake off its soap-opera past?

You Will Regret This Investment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Some small-cap Chinese firms listed on U.S. exchanges file financial reports that have little relationship to reality.

You Will Regret This Investment

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

You Will Regret This Investment

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

You Will Regret This Investment

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How did a retiree in Texas discover that some Chinese companies listed in the U.S. are frauds, unleashing an army of short sellers and a whirl of investigations?

If Demography Is Destiny, Then India Has the Edge

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Research shows working-age populations are slipping in the U.S. and other industrialized nations while those of other countries are growing faster.

Global Oil Companies Discover Cash in Their Trash

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Major oil companies have been selling marginal assets to plow money into higher-return investments. Little did they know that China would be interested.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

Rare Earths from Japan's Junk Pile

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

China's export restrictions on rare earth minerals may help the world's environment.

Rare Earths from Japan's Junk Pile

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japan is recycling rare earth metals because China has cut the world supply.

A Global Scare in Food Prices

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With drought and flood hurting harvests - and population growth increasing demand - some forecasters see significant food price increases in 2011.

Chinese Plants Grow on U.S. Turf

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Companies from China are setting up shop in the U.S. to avoid trade barriers and to take advantage of government subsidies. Should U.S. operations managers take note?

Chinese Plants Grow on U.S. Turf

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Companies from China are increasingly setting up shop in the U.S. to avoid trade barriers and to learn new ways to compete.

Here Come the Chinese Phone Manufacturers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mainland Chinese companies are gaining ground in terms of mobile phone sales, selling at home and abroad.

Here Come the Chinese Phone Manufacturers

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

After years of trailing global giants, mainland companies are surging with cheap smartphones.

China Wants Nuclear Reactors - Fast

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

China plans to build 245 nuclear power plants in coming years at a cost of over half a trillion dollars. It will become a formidable player in the nuclear industry in the process.

India Revives an Old Plan for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India is trying to catch up to China by building special economic zones that promote manufacturing and exports.

China Takes Aim at Boeing and Airbus

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is starting to build larger commercial aircraft to compete with Boeing and Airbus, with the help of Western suppliers.

Cotton Is King Again, Especially in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese apparel producers are being squeezed by cotton shortages, which will lead to higher clothing prices in U.S. stores.

How Baidu Won China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Robin Li beat Google and made his search engine No. 1 in China. Now he wants to go global, but it will take some work to get the world to trust Baidu.

India Outsourcers Feel Unloved in the U.S.

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A ban on offshoring Ohio government IT projects feels like the thin edge of the wedge in Bangalore. Is Ohio being stupid?

The Keynes Solution

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should be done about the global economy?

Fixing the Global Trade System by the Numbers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Just how much pull President Obama has with Beijing may become clear when G-20 leaders meet in Seoul to consider a U.S. proposal to limit trade surpluses and deficits. It may not be enough.

Coke's Last Round

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The developed world can't drink any more Coke, and India and China are saturated with competitors. That leaves Africa as the last great growth opportunity for Coke.

Coke's Last Round

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sales are flat in developed countries. For Coke to keep growing, Africa is it.

Those Amber Waves Are Fueling Exports

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a weak dollar and poor growing conditions in Europe, U.S. farm exports are strong this year.

Made in China

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Meet the Chinese tilapia, a bland food product that grows fast and sells cheap. Environmentalists hate it, but Americans keep ordering more.

Made in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The Chinese tilapia is a bland-tasting fish that grows fast, sells cheap, and has environmentalists up in arms. U.S. fish farmers aren't happy either.

Geithner's Bold Push for a Stronger Yuan

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The Treasury Secretary is attempting to use more IMF voting rights for China as leverage for the U.S. position that the yuan must be allowed to rise; will this work?

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

A $14.5 Trillion Economy Stuck in Neutral

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What do we do to get the $14.5 trillion economy going again?

The United States of Tariffs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. has used tariffs for more than two centuries to raise revenue and protect American industry. Will this work again in an era of diminished American power?

Africa Looks Like a Dealmaker's Paradise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Some $15 billion in takeovers have been announced in July, with the latest being Wal-Mart's agreement to buy South African retailer Massmart.

Never Miss A Good Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Shaking off disgrace and a $1.6 billion fine, the German conglomerate aims to build the world's infrastructure, especially in emerging markets.

The Ultimate Driving Machine

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

BMW CEO Norbert Reithofer believes the future of his company is about more than high-performance suburban status symbols

On the Yuan, Be Careful What You Wish For

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is the real value of the Chinese yuan?

Chairman Gou

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Foxconn's Terry Gou might be regarded as Henry Ford reincarnated if only a dozen of his 920,000 workers hadn't killed themselves this year

Chairman Gou

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Most Westerners are unfamiliar with Foxconn, but know the products it makes as a contractor for Apple, HP, Sony, Dell, and other electronics firms

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's booming demand for iron ore is causing opportunities and problems in Australia.

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Exports to China have helped Australia escape the global recession. Nonetheless, many Australians are worried.

Running Afoul of China, BYD Could Lose Plants

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Many eyes are watching to see if the Chinese land ministry makes BYD an example of its commitment to land protection.

Citigroup Bets on More Growth in China

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The bank will triple its workforce to as many as 12,000 over the next three years and open 10 new offices in a bid to expand consumer banking in the fast-growing market.

The Zero Percent Solution

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should the Federal Reserve do with interest rates?

How GE Helps China Build Business Leaders

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Non-GE Chinese executives attend GE's U.S. training courses.

The World's Most Caffeinated Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Coffee consumption and economic growth appear to be linked.

Drought in China Hits the Energy Sector

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Southern China's significant dependence on hydroelectric power, coupled with drought, has led to energy shortages.

What Sold China on Amway

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The company's culture blends with China's entrepreneurial bent, making the mainland its top market.

The Sheriffs of Marlboro Country

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Black market cigarettes are a big business and are cutting into Altria's profits.

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Ford make up for lost time in Asia?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting production, as well as investment and marketing, in fast-growing China and India

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why is it critical for Ford to be well-positioned in the Asia-Pacific auto market?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Ford is making up for lost time, boosting investment, production, and marketing in fast-growing China and India

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting investment, production, and marketing in fast-growing China and India

Closing for Business?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Western companies compete in Beijing?

Closing for Business?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In a recent change, Western companies are finding themselves shut out of business or production opportunities as Beijing promotes homegrown rivals.

Closing for Business?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Western companies are finding themselves shut out as Beijing promotes homegrown rivals.

Closing for Business?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Western companies are finding themselves shut out as Beijing promotes homegrown rivals.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

The Ka-Ching in China Luring Medical Giants

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

GE, Siemens, and others are angling for a piece of the $125 billion Beijing plans to spend on health care

Deadly Business in Moscow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The lawlessness of the legal system can make business in Russia difficult.

Deadly Business in Moscow

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Russia has fallen out of favor with international investors because of its corruption and abuse of business people.

Is China Fed Up with the Colonel's Chicken?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mainland same-store sales at KFC and Pizza Hut are down. Why that's a troubling sign for Western fast food.

Japan's Car Guys Cross the China Sea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese automakers are hiring more Japanese engineers to boost efficiency and improve design.

Don't Underestimate India's Consumers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Western multinationals are often attracted to China's size, but they're bypassing Asia's true shopping powerhouse.

China: Where Retail Dinosaurs Are Thriving

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

What type of retail institution is in decline in the U.S. but thriving in China? Why?

Google and China: A Win for Liberty - and Strategy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Google's threatened pullout from China may be motivated by principles, or maybe just profits

Endless Oil

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is the global oil supply endless?

China's Carbon-Credit Hustle

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Carbon credits provide an incentive to build green energy projects. Sometimes, however, the projects would have been built without the incentive.

China's 'Made in China' Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The downside to Beijing's huge stimulus is a glut of factories and output that may spur trade friction.

A French Wal-Mart's Global Blitz

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mega-retailer Auchan has a powerful patriarch, a secretive culture, and an insatiable urge to expand.

Why Copenhagen Will Be Good for Business

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A deal at the climate conference could tip the balance toward renewable energy sources and offer opportunities for companies, albeit while hurting other enterprises and delaying U.S. energy independence.

Shelly Adelson's Misstep in Macao

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Misreading the Asian market may become a costly mistake for the Las Vegas Sands chairman.

Indian vs. Chinese Autos: No Contest

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's exports are pulling ahead, thanks to quality and engineering that China's carmakers don't match.

China's End Run Around the U.S.

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will Beijing dominate the future in world trade?

A Slog in China for Foreign Insurers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Strong domestic players and restrictions on foreign companies make it tough for insurers.

The China Hype

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite an impressive rebound, an innovation shortfall may hobble sustainable growth.

China’s New Piracy Cops: Web Sites

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Western companies hope domestic disputes mean Beijing will get serious about intellectual property theft.

The World’s Factories are Hardly Humming

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Manufacturing around the world largely remains in decline. Relatively speaking, how is the U.S. doing?

What's Holding India Back

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Business is battling farmers over land, putting $98 billion in investments

The Peril and Promise of Investing in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's still risky, but for global corporations, the country is simply too big - and too rich - to ignore.

Searching for True North

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Investing guages are broken, market signals are mixed, and money managers don't know where to turn. What exactly is the new normal?

Searching for True North

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Investing guages are broken, market signals are mixed, and money managers don't know where to turn. What exactly is the new normal?

Searching for True North

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Investing guages are broken, market signals are mixed, and money managers don't know where to turn. What exactly is the new normal?

Pepsi's Web-Smart Thrust into China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Cola Wars move to cyberspace in China.

How the Global Economy Is Rebalancing

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the economies of Asia, the Americas, and Europe revive together?

A Tiff over Tires

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tit-for-tat trade troubles brew between China and the U.S.

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

No Big Fix for Global Finance

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

World leaders are talking bravely about fixing the global financial system. But will any new regulations be so weak that they will leave us at risk?

Can the Future be Built in America?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The manufacturing exodus from the U.S. is accelerating, but smarter tax policies, low-cost loans, and industrial zones may help keep factories at home.

Starwood is Blanketing China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How do you revitalize buffeted domestic brands?

Starwood is Blanketing China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The Sheraton brand is doing well in China, and is expected to grow as tourism increases

Brazil's Coming Rebound

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With sound banks, effective government policies and strong consumer spending, Brazil may finally be on the way to economic growth.

Will Iraq Be an Oil Power Again?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Iraq's deal with BP signals a revival that could eventually put it on a par with the Saudis.

Is China Leading a Global Recovery?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Many firms are hoping that Chinese consumers can help boost demand for their products.

'Motorola Has One Bullet Left in Its Gun'

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

New phones equipped with Google's Android operating system may come to market too late to save Motorola's mobile-phone business.

GM's Korean Quandary

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

GM's debt-swamped Daewoo division is slumping badly, but it's too important to GM to sell.

China's Shopping Spree

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese companies are looking at acquiring foreign firms as a way of investing their overseas earnings.

A Resurgent Asia Will Lead the Global Recovery

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will Asia be able to lift the world out of its recession?

Coke vs. Pepsi: The Slugfest in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In a hard-fought contest, Coke is opening plants, boosting non-soda brands, and jazzing up marketing.

Coke vs. Pepsi: The Slugfest in China

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Coke is hoping aggressive plant expansion and sharper marketing will keep its rival at bay.

Beijing Bolsters the Barriers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite appeals to the WTO, there's not much the U.S. can do about China's protectionist policies.

Where the Action is in China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the fastest-growing region in China?

China's Eroding Advantage

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What shifts are ahead in global economics?

China's Eroding Advantage

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A new study says rising wages in China and higher shipping costs make Mexico a better choice for manufacturing even before country political risk is considered.

China's Eroding Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcers are seeing the costs of manufacturing in China climb, making other countries more attractive.

The Surprising Strength of Southeast Asia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite continuing concerns about corruption, red tape, and political instability, it's suffering far less than other parts of the world.

The Surprising Strength of Southeast Asia

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Despite continuing concerns about corruption, red tape, and political instability, Southeast Asia is suffering far less than other parts of the world.

Chinese Carmakers Are Gaining at Home

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why didn't global auto manufacturers skip the Shanghai auto show in April?

Chinese Carmakers Are Gaining at Home

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Incentives for improved efficiency and low prices give domestic Chinese producers an edge when competing in one of the most attractive automotive markets.

China's Doubts about the Dollar

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will U.S. deficits do to the value of the dollar?

China's Doubts about the Dollar

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Huge U.S. budget deficits have caused some countries to question the role of the dollar as the world's reserve currency. Maintaining the dollar's status as the preferred currency for international transactions is important for U.S. competitiveness.

Wal-Mart's Green Stick

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Wal-Mart is prodding its Chinese suppliers to be more green.

Can China Clean up its Act?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's growing demand for energy is causing it to invest in clean technology.

Good Times for Cheap Cell Phones

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As several established mobile-phone companies stumble, China's ZTE is moving up in market share.

A Bid to Reconnect With America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nokia gets rave reviews around the world, and its global market share is increasing. Now it's out to boost its low U.S. market share.

M&A: Behind the Heat on Global Deals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Heightened antitrust action, such as China's no on Coke-Huiyuan, may signal a new approach to protectionism.

Chinese Polluters Point to Western Demand

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

So whose fault is it that China is now the #1 polluting nation?

Inspiration From Emerging Economies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Innovation used to trickle down from rich countries to developing markets. Now it is starting to flow the other way.

Global Sluggishness Will Slow a U.S. Recovery

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What has globalization done to economic recovery in the U.S.?

China's Exporters Look Homeward

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As global sales slump, mainland manufacturers start to woo Chinese consumers and threaten multinationals.

What Falling Prices Tell Us

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens when prices fall?

GM Hits a Wall in China, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese consumers, concerned about quality and GM's future, are finding GM less attractive than they have in the past.

GM Hits a Wall in China, Too

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Slowing sales and too many brands are dragging the automaker down.

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

The Fix Has Not Fixed BofA

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How did Bank of America's hasty Merrill takeover put its future, as well as the federal bailout program, in jeopardy? What more can Washington do to prop up BofA and other banks and save the recovery plan?

State Capitalism

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will free enterprise survive the current recession?

Trade: Hawks Will Square Off against Retailers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Consumers and retailers want low-cost foreign goods, while domestic manufacturers want protection from these same goods. Who will win in the new Obama Administration?

Trade: Hawks Will Square Off against Retailers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

America's trade deficit with China was a contentious campaign issue. Lowering the trade deficit will be a difficult task for the incoming administration.

Search Engine Squeeze?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

There is some evidence that Baidu is abusing its position as China's internet search leader. Businesses report that salespeople working for Baidu will drop sites from search results if they don't buy sponsored links. Former business clients say their rankings fell after they stopped buying search-related ads from Baidu.

Is Silicon Valley Losing its Magic?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Silicon Valley still deliver financing and innovation?

China: An Early Test for Obama

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. trade hawks are pressing Obama to get tough with Beijing over charges of steel dumping and export subsidies.

Behind Caterpillar's Big Scoop in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Patience, persistence, and transfer of technology paved the way for Caterpillar to make a big acquisition in China.

How Risky is India?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In the wake of the Mumbai siege, businesses must weigh the persistence of political violence against the strength and promise of the Indian miracle.

China's Consumers: Too Scared to Spend

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Instead of sustaining global growth, as the world hoped, China's new middle class is hunkering down.

The Taking of NASA's Secrets

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

In order to save billions of dollars in research and development, some countries are using hackers to steal valuable information from America's military and scientific institutions and the defense industry that serves them.

Enough Shock Treatment?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is $2.6 trillion enough to lift the global economy?

Cisco's Brave New World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cisco, the technology company that sells everything from million-dollar routers to videoconferencing systems, also has consulting services to help companies and countries upgrade their infrastructure.

The New Silk Road

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How are the Middle East and Asia responding to their new wealth?

Taxes: Time to Forge a Compromise

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Business leaders say Obama's plan to end the tax deferment for overseas corporate profits will stymie growth.

Bloodied but Still Strong

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is the global view of the U.S. economy?

Outsourcing the Drug Industry

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Migration of the pharma research jobs

Global Office Space is in the Basement

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The ripple effects of the U.S. credit crunch are impacting developers and banks in Shanghai, London, Tokyo and virtually everywhere else.

After the Games, a Dimming Flame

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's growth will cool as slowing global demand and rising costs at home impact exports and profits.

Stalking the Wild Copycats

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Africa, no consumer product seems too small or too cheap to be targeted by Chinese counterfeiters.

Can the U.S. Bring Jobs Back From China?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can U.S. manufacturers seize the opportunity of higher energy costs to bring jobs back to the states?

Can the U.S. Bring Jobs Back From China?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Expensive oil and a falling dollar are reducing some of the advantages of shifting production out of the U.S. to China, but don't expect a sudden surge in U.S. manufacturing jobs.

Bulking up: Japan's drugmakers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japanese drugmakers are on an overseas acquisition binge to get bigger. For the first time, they pose a competitive threat to the big Western firms.

Why China Is Finally Tackling Video Piracy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Beijing wants to protect lucrative broadcasting rights for the Summer Games, but will a one-good-example change lead to changes after the Games are over?

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Why move auto producton to Japan when it is cheaper elsewhere?

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility and higher quality.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility.

Made in China: MRI Machines

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Device makers are stepping up manufacturing on the mainland and raising safety concerns.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault-Nissan, is working to position his company for the new reality of the worldwide auto industry: increased demand for smaller, more fuel-efficient cars designed to appeal to local market needs and tastes.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Renault-Nissan CEO is fighting to keep pace in the U.S. and chasing Chinese and Indian customers.

Acting Globally but Selling Locally

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In athletic wear, local brands are not the heroes in China's growing market.

Acting Globally but Selling Locally

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese athletic wear maker Li Ning is raising its international profile to win over shoppers at home.

Acting Globally but Selling Locally

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Chinese athletic wear maker Li Ning is raising its international profile to win over shoppers at home.

China's Factory Blues

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The days of ultra-cheap labor and little regulation are gone. As manufacturers' costs climb, export prices will follow.

China's Factory Blues

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The days of ultra-cheap labor and minimal regulation are gone. As exporters' costs increase, they must shift production to lower-cost locations and/or raise prices.

China's Factory Blues

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A combination of factors have made China the world's factory floor, but recent changes are forcing a restructuring of Chinese industry.

Refighting Nafta

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The free-trade deal is taking the blame for huge job losses. But its true effects on workers and competitiveness are far more complicated.

China's Carbon Explosion

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Global warming won't slow unless China comes on board

Wrestling the Olympics Activists

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

How corporate sponsors of the Beijing Games plan to deal with mounting pressure from advocates for Darfur.

Brazil's Iron Giant Reaches for the Top

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the world's mining and steel making industries, every firm seems to be predator, prey or both.

A Plug for a Leaky Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What impact does foreign trade have on the U.S. economy?

What's Roiling India's Stock Market? Bonds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's debt and equity markets are hobbled by regulations that are intended to serve and protect small investors.

On the Trail of the Missing iPhones

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

In what has been dubbed the Mystery of the Missing iPhones, last month, Apple and AT&T reported that 1.7 million iPhones had been purchased but not activated on the AT&T network, meaning that there are 1.7 million iPhones out there being used for unknown purposes.

Just Don't Call It 'Chindia'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China and India are both currently booming. Foreign executives have found, however, that the formula for success in one probably will not apply to the other.

Catching the Eye of China's Elite

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Getting the attention of upscale Chinese urbanites.

He Works Hard for the Money

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

U.S. Camry owners will be surprised.

Exporting America's Travails

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What role will the global economy play on a U.S. downturn?

Electric Car Acid Test

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Are you ready to shut down the world oil industry? Shai Agassi is.

Exporting America's Travails

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In recent decades, when the U.S. sneezed, the rest of the world caught a cold. Has the influence of the U.S. economy on the rest of the world decreased in recent years?

International Isn't Just IBM's First Name

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

IBM has had to undergo a monumental shift in its operational philosophy. In the past three years, IBM has hired more than 90,000 people in fast-developing countries like Brazil, China, and India.

The Dirty Dilemma of Canadian Crude

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is the security of using Canadian crude oil worth its environmental costs?

Psst! Wanna Buy an iPhone?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Apple currently does not sell iPhones in China; nevertheless, iPhones are available to those willing to pay the price.

Psst! Wanna Buy an iPhone?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Apple's popular cell phone, the iPhone, isn't legally available in China yet, but you can buy one at any electronics shop in Beijing for around $680. These iPhones have been purchased elsewhere and smuggled into China. They have then been hacked so that they can use local cell-phone carriers, and Chinese characters have been inputted onto their touch screens.

The Coming Commodity Clash

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Will commodities continue to be in short supply?

The Coming Commodity Clash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As industrial growth and infrastructure development continue to be strong in India and China, these countries' demand for basic commodities grows.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Despite global turmoil China's stock markets are still up 102% through November 14th.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Capital is rushing into China, Chinese companies are going public, and many individuals and companies are trying to profit by investing in listed firms.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

China's stocks are sky-high compared to other markets, and Chinese companies are huge investors. That means a serious market drop could put corporate balance sheets into freefall, possibly producing a vicious cycle that would crash the Chinese stock market.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's stocks are sky-high compared to other markets, and Chinese companies are huge investors. That means a serious market drop could put corporate balance sheets into freefall, possibly producing a vicious cycle that would crash the Chinese stock market.

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

China's stocks are sky-high compared to other markets, and Chinese companies are huge investors. That means a serious market drop could put corporate balance sheets into freefall, possibly producing a vicious cycle that would crash the Chinese stock market.

You Say Guanxi, I Say Schmoozing

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How do you get results in China through relationships?

You Say Guanxi, I Say Schmoozing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Making good use of connections and networks has always been important in business, particularly in China. Now guanxi, loosely translated as relationships or connections, is undergoing some changes.

China's E-Tail Awakening

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In China, new online-payment systems are drawing wary customers into the world of Web commerce.

The New Financial Heavyweights

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sovereign funds totaling $2.8 trillion from China, the Mideast and elsewhere are redrawing the global investment map.

A Helping Hand From Foreign Demand

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Solid global growth in developed and emerging markets means trading partners will provide a cushion as the U.S. economy slows domestically due to the housing slump, according to the BusinessWeek article A Helping Hand From Foreign Demand (November 5, 2007). Home construction will have subtracted about a percentage point in overall growth when third-quarter data is released on Oct. 31. The turnaround in the trade gap that began in late 2005 will provide some support for the economy.


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