Regions

U.S. Oil's $10 Billion Venezuelan Threat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Several U.S. refineries have been specifically calibrated to work with Venezuela's sludgy high-density, high-sulphur crude oil. Last year, $10 billion of Venezuelan crude oil was imported and refined, helping keep gas prices low. But with the political and economic turmoil in Venezuela, as well as the possibility of sanctions against Venezuela's government, U.S. consumers and refiners could face adverse consequences.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Carlos Ghosn has assembled an alliance of auto manufacturers that has a global reach. He successfully turned around the struggling French auto company Renault, and later was successful with Nissan. The alliance now includes Mitsubishi, AvtoVaz, and Dongfeng.

Globalism Is Alive and Well

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

As chairman and CEO of a global alliance of auto companies, Carlos Ghosn has had success with helping struggling companies become more profitable. He believes in cutting marginal operations so that he can invest in the more profitable ones and help them thrive. He is an advocate of globalization.

Mobile Carriers Start Hanging Up on Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The past decade has seen a significant buildup of mobile phone networks across Africa, with countries auctioning spectrum to multinational bidders that hoped to cash in on the projected growth of subscribers on the continent. The costs involved, along with new regulatory hurdles, have caused some multinational telecom firms to scale back on their investments. One new wrinkle is requiring mobile phone operators to at least partially list their shares on local exchanges and make stock ownership available to local investors.

Re-creating the Sun on Earth

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

The future of nuclear energy is at risk. A lack of funding could delay the project for years.

Can VR Find a Seat in the Parlor?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Virtual reality is not a hit at home, so Imax tries arcades. Imax is piloting VR centers, since the cost of equipment has been a drag on consumers’ embrace of virtual reality. Tech and entertainment companies are racing for a slice of the virtual reality business, which Goldman estimates could generate $80 billion in revenue by 2025.

Changes On Tap for Japan's Beer Tax

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The proposed uniform tax rate across beer classes in Japan is intended to simplify the labeling of beers and promote beer exports. Craft beers in Japan, which make up a slim share of the market, may see increased popularity in their beer recipes as a result of tax revisions. Kanpai (Cheers)!

Where Did You Get That Lovely Supply Chain?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Kering, the corporate parent of many famous fashion brands, including Yves Saint Laurent, Puma, and Gucci, has taken steps to improve the business practices of its suppliers down the supply chain. Francois-Henri Pinault has followed in his father's footsteps in developing a corporate culture that tries to make the world a better place while also making money. Each year the company produces a corporate sustainability report that outlines steps it takes to make the world a better place while also making high-end luxury products.

Tired of Halal Chicken? Try the Eyeshadow

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Cosmetics makers are stepping up production of halal makeup, a fast-growing market worth $27 billion globally. But not every company wants the public to know.

A Continent Divided

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

In the coming 12 months, four of Europe’s five largest economies have major referendums or elections. During these European elections, anti-immigrant parties are likely to score substantial gains and further weaken the European political establishment.

Amazon’s Shifting Tax Story

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Amazon’s tax strategy draws the scrutiny of regulators in the United States and Europe. What is Amazon’s core tech worth? It depends on which taxman asks.

A More Comfortable Berth for Lobsters

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

In an attempt to cope with oversupply of standard shipping containers and low transport prices, some large shipping and freight companies have turned their attention toward developing very special containers for the transport of specialized goods. These companies are hoping that the superior product can help them fetch higher transport prices and higher profits.

Memo From Netflix: 'Ich Bin ein Berliner'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to attract European customers, an increasing number of content distribution companies like Netflix and Amazon are developing exclusive programs and series. Whereas the exclusive programming that Amazon and Netflix have developed in the U.S. to attract customers has some level of international appeal, in order to gain market share in European countries these firms are investing in original content tailored to each country's language and culture.

Bond Trader's Dilemma

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Deepening concern over the global economy has made sub-zero interest rates the norm in most European Union countries as well as Japan. The willingness of debt investors to effectively pay governments to borrow reflects increasing skepticism of central bank policies and concern that those policies may ultimately do more harm than good to the global economy.

Google Isn’t Paying the ‘Google Tax’

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Google somehow pays an effective tax rate of about 7 percent on its non-U.S. income. How does it (and other internet companies) keep this rate so low?

E-Mail Spam Goes Artisanal

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

You may start getting more spam e-mails now because spammers have found new ways for getting around the filters.

Long Live the King

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Burger King is relying more heavily on data to make sure its marketing is cost-effective as it reaches customers through digital and social media. Franchisees say the resulting buzz has translated into higher restaurant sales, and the company is doing it for about one fourth of what McDonald’s spends on advertising.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Dairy farms around the world are suffering from declining milk prices. A combination of reduced Chinese demand for imported milk and Russia’s ban on EU, American, and Australian milk has left the global market awash with milk. As a result, global dairy prices are falling with no turnaround in sight.

Insider Trading Then and Now

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

It used to be complicated and expensive to cultivate and maintain a pipeline of contacts for insider trading with illicit stock tips. Now insider trading is much simpler to coordinate and execute.

State-Owned Areva is Leaking Cash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

France's attempt to make money selling nuclear power plants has fallen flat.

Drone Makers Seek Traffic Control

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Commercial drones are still mostly illegal in the U.S., but the industry and NASA are working to keep them from colliding.

Are Credit Suisse, RBS, Standard Chartered, HSBC, and Barclays Terrorist Banks?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What kind of liability are major banks facing for being the conduit for money used in terrorist activities?

Uber Alles

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Though Uber keeps expanding, not all cities are welcoming the car service app with open arms.

Can Renault Keep Dacia Cheap?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How is Renault doing with its low-price Dacia car brand?

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

After success in Scandinavia and Britain, Netflix sets its sights on Germany and France.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What plans does Netflix have for expansion in Europe?

Tax-Averse French Discover Portugal

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Lisbon is not Paris. But Portuguese taxes have their allure.

A Drone Simple Enough for Anyone to Use

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

DJI’s early lead in the drone industry may put it at the center of the debate over regulation and privacy.

Why Wal-Mart Hasn't Conquered Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Wal-Mart's everyday low prices aren't so popular in Brazil.

Merkel Gets Tough on Russia

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Germany is exploring the possibility of harsh sanctions. Will Europe follow?

An Immodest Proposal

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Is a global wealth tax a realistic eventuality?

French Beret Makers: Then There Was One

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The last French beret maker expects to make almost 200,000 this year. France used to produce millions.

Germany's Coalition Looks to Gender Quotas

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Should boardroom gender diversity be legislated?

Yes, Real Men Drink Beer and Use Skin Moisturizer

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Not for women only: Sales of men’s grooming products—from exfoliating scrubs to self-tanning creams—are expected to rise 5 percent this year, building a $17.5 billion industry.

How the Robots Lost

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Why is it getting harder to make money in high-frequency trading? Those robots are just too good.

At Tax Time, It’s Good to Be an American

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How does America's tax system stack up against the rest of the world? The facts might surprise you.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

M.A.C. cosmetics finds sales opportunities for its high-end products in ethnic areas and emerging markets.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Estee Lauder is using its M.A.C. cosmetics line, a hit with ethnic consumers at home, to enter emerging markets.

A Harvard Professor Wins Over the French

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Gita Gopinath offers a way to mimic a devaluation without a euro bust-up.

Germany Frets as France Declines

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A Moody’s downgrade of French debt highlights France’s weakness.

The Problem With Patching Up the Tax Code

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Is it possible to significantly reduce the budget deficit by cutting loopholes?

Made in France Can Be a Tough Sell in France

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

In an effort to help the ailing French economy, top political leaders are encouraging citizens to make a hard choice.

France's Fleeing Billionaire

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

More than one rich individual is revoking their citizenship in order to reduce their tax burden. Who is the latest to threaten to do this? Why is this happening now?

Sanofi's Shock Therapy Enrages the French

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

France's Sanofi is closing R&D facilities in France and shifting research to America amid worker protests.

Europe's Latest Hardliners: German Automakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While French and Italian automakers are feeling the pain of Europe's economic slowdown (and want financial assistance), German automakers that have long emphasized export markets in North America and Asia don't believe they should be asked to help in a bailout.

Who Lost the Euro?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What's going on in Europe?

A Date With Dr. Nein

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can austerity work in restoring Europe's economy?

Grounds Zero

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Why hasn't Starbucks tried to enter the market that inspired its development?

On Top of the World - And Out $43 Billion

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

ArcelorMittal is the world's largest steel company. Heavy debt from acquisitions is forcing the company to cut costs and conserve cash.

A Spanish Starbucks For Sandwiches

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Spain's 100 Montaditos intends to open 4,000 stores in the USA at a pace far faster than Starbucks' early growth. Analysts are skeptical.

The Debt Crisis Could Shift to Paris

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

France's debt woes are less well known but, over the long run, may be no less severe than those of Greece.

A Downfall's Fallout

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does Europe lose in the IMF chief's downfall?

In France, Vive la Tupperware

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tupperware's growing army of culinary advisors have boosted sales in France by 17 percent.

Stars and Stripes and Servers Forever

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Startup SeaMicro says it can compete with bigger rivals by selling efficient, low-power, made-in-America servers geared for Web work.

In France, There's Pain in the Rising Cost of Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a drought in Russia and floods in Canada and Australia, wheat prices have doubled in the past year. Now the French are seeing increases in the price of baguettes.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

China Takes Aim at Boeing and Airbus

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is starting to build larger commercial aircraft to compete with Boeing and Airbus, with the help of Western suppliers.

Small Fish Devouring Other Small Fish

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Emerging-market telecoms are driving the latest round of buyouts.

Immigrants in the West Aren't Going Away

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Despite a surge of anti-immigrant feeling in some countries, most have stayed put. How can employers use them within the law?

It's Portugal Against the Bond Traders

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Is Portugal the next Greece? Some bond traders seem to think so.

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

Greece Rattles the Euro Zone

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will Greece be the first country in the EU to default?

A French Wal-Mart's Global Blitz

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mega-retailer Auchan has a powerful patriarch, a secretive culture, and an insatiable urge to expand.

Financial Reform: No Time to Pull Back

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

France's Finance Minister says the crisis is easing, but it's far too soon to declare victory.

A Hidden Drag on the Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens to temporary workers in a recession?

'This Would Be Bigger Than NAFTA'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Quebec is easing commerce and labor barriers with France, which may lead to a broader Canada-EU deal.

Nuclear's Tangled Economics

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can nuclear plants solve our energy crisis? And if so, at what cost?

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Apple's iPhone, a blockbuster in the U.S., has not been as successful in Europe.

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

The iPhone's high price and strong competition from companies like Nokia have led to shipments that are far below expectations.

Electric Car Acid Test

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Are you ready to shut down the world oil industry? Shai Agassi is.

Free Papers, Costly Competition

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

These are difficult times in the free (advertising-based) newspaper industry. The industry leader has been Metro International, which has expanded to more than 70 cities worldwide but lost $32.7 million on sales of $314 million in the first nine months of 2007.


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