Regions

Adidas Automates to Make Shoes Faster

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Adidas is opening two new highly automated manufacturing facilities that can produce customized shoes quickly and closer to markets. A new factory in Germany can produce about half a million pairs of shoes annually while employing 160 people. A similar factory will open soon near Atlanta. The goal with these factories is to be able to respond quickly to new trends and help maintain stocks of highly-sought, full-price items.

Adidas Automates to Make Shoes Faster

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Adidas' new "Speedfactories" in Germany and the U.S. will use automation to get new shoe designs to stores in days rather than months. Adidas says this is the biggest revolution in shoe manufacturing since moving production to Asia.

Bombardier's Painful Double Whammy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Canada's Bombardier received a couple pieces of bad news this week. In the rail business, Germany's Siemens decided to pursue a merger with France's Alstom, which at least for now leaves Bombardier as a much smaller player in the worldwide rail market. Its aircraft unit also learned that the U.S. Department of Commerce issued a preliminary ruling in favor of Boeing that Bombardier received significant subsidies from the Canadian government and, as a result, imported Bombardier aircraft will be subject to duties.

Game of Kings

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

For more than two decades, Russian grandmaster Lev Alburt has taught strategy, patience, and prognostication to the finest in finance.

Germany Stays in the Center

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Globalism is alive and well in Germany, where 46 percent of GDP comes from exports. While large, well-known manufacturing firms are responsible for some of these exports, so are the much smaller, privately owned German manufacturing firms that export goods worldwide. Delo Industrie Klebstoffe GmbH, for example, makes the glue used in 80 percent of smart cards worldwide.

Target Slips Up

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The No. 2 U.S. discounter, Target, faces a revitalized Whole Foods, backed by a deep-pocketed parent-to-be. Retailers are adding groceries to their mix because they keep customers coming back. But Target gets only 20 percent of sales from food, while Wal-Mart gets 56 percent.

A Billionaire Emerges on the Silicon Steppe

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Boris Nuraliev’s 1C has become Russia’s No. 2 seller of enterprise software. To keep growing, he’s seeking to expand into foreign markets.

Why Mexico's Autoworkers Aren't Prospering

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The role of unions in Mexican factories is a bit different from the standard procedure in the United States. Before a factory even opens, a contract is signed between a local labor union that will represent workers and the factory's owner. Dues are paid by the factory, and many workers are not even aware they are members of the union.

China's Robot Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is fast becoming one of the larger markets for workplace automation. This has led to the development of a large number of Chinese companies in the robotics and automation industries, though many currently just assemble components designed and manufactured by leading German, American, and Japanese robotics companies. But in the process, these companies and Chinese central planners are working to create a competitive robotics industry in China.

China’s Robot Revolution

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Some 800 robot makers seek scale as Chinese industry automates. JD.com, E-Deodar, and Midea lead China’s charge for domination. It has also deployed a pollution-monitoring robot and a deep-sea robot.

Achtung, Berlin: Your Flight Is Five Years Late

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Five years from its original scheduled opening, Berlin’s new international airport remains closed. Delays in construction and remedying problems have doubled the new airport’s total costs to $5 billion. In addition, German airlines and local businesses which expected the new airport to open on time have lost substantial financial investments.

General Motors: A Continental Retreat

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

After pulling Chevrolet out of Europe in 2013, prospects for General Motors there have not improved. Now GM has agreed to pay French automaker PSA Group to take Opel and Vauxhall Motors as it exits Europe.

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Can You Say Class Action in German? Nein

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

The Volkswagen emissions litigation has highlighted the obstacles plaintiffs face in the German legal system. Class actions are generally disallowed in Germany except for some aspects of investor suits.

Is Amazon Europe’s Next Top Model?

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Amazon signs up models and socialites, cozies up to such brands as Hugo Boss and Gucci, and launches a social marketing blitz to take more of Western Europe’s $42 billion market for online shoe and apparel sales from local hero Zalando.

How Adidas Got Back in the Game

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Adidas's stock price is seeing a nice rise as the company picks up market share and sponsorship agreements. Part of the rise is fueled by a greater emphasis on fashion, including limited edition shoes. Adidas is also working with music entertainers to have them "design" shoes for the company.

How Adidas Got Back in the Game

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Adidas has aggressively added celebrity- and fashion-oriented styles. That’s led to a 100 percent rise in its share price in twelve months.

Amazon’s Shifting Tax Story

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Amazon’s tax strategy draws the scrutiny of regulators in the United States and Europe. What is Amazon’s core tech worth? It depends on which taxman asks.

Why German Industry Is Training Refugees

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants are flowing into Germany, seeking relief from economic or political strife in their home countries. To help these immigrants start new lives in their adopted country, many German companies are participating in a government-sponsored program to provide job training opportunities. While the results have been slight so far, the program is a source of hope for participants.

German Engineering for Chinese Wannabes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Germany's Borgward auto company was founded in 1924 and at one point was responsible for 60 percent of the country's auto exports. By 1961, however, it had gone out of business. Now the brand is being revived in China, with a Borgward SUV being manufactured by Chinese truck-maker, Beiqi Foton.

An East German Challenge to the Swiss

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Last year, watch exports from Germany rose 14 percent, while Swiss watch exports fell 3 percent. Part of the difference in magnitude is driven by the significantly smaller size of the German watchmaking industry, but underlying economics help explain the trends. As the euro has fallen in value relative to the Swiss franc, German watches are relatively more affordable.

Fences of Fear

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

For three decades, Europe has had borderless travel between countries. Due to increased security threats, several countries have installed temporary border checkpoints at some locations. If these border checkpoints become permanent, the European economy would lose billions of euros in GDP growth.

Memo From Netflix: 'Ich Bin ein Berliner'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to attract European customers, an increasing number of content distribution companies like Netflix and Amazon are developing exclusive programs and series. Whereas the exclusive programming that Amazon and Netflix have developed in the U.S. to attract customers has some level of international appeal, in order to gain market share in European countries these firms are investing in original content tailored to each country's language and culture.

Bond Trader's Dilemma

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Deepening concern over the global economy has made sub-zero interest rates the norm in most European Union countries as well as Japan. The willingness of debt investors to effectively pay governments to borrow reflects increasing skepticism of central bank policies and concern that those policies may ultimately do more harm than good to the global economy.

Google Isn’t Paying the ‘Google Tax’

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Google somehow pays an effective tax rate of about 7 percent on its non-U.S. income. How does it (and other internet companies) keep this rate so low?

A Syrian Lawyer Took a Job as a Janitor to Learn More About Germany

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Europe is currently facing its largest refugee crisis since World War II. Germany can use this crisis to help solve its demographic challenges.

Spain's Creating Plenty of Jobs—Lousy Ones

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The fact that Spain is creating about 500,000 jobs annually is seemingly good news for Spaniards. But a close look at the quality of those jobs reveals longer-term concerns for the Spanish labor force and policy officials.

Die Grundertrainerin Will See You Now

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

You have to be crazy to begin a startup. Can I be your therapist?

Some Falafel Shops Go Better With Coca-Cola

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Coke offers small restaurants in Germany access to an app that will facilitate online ordering of food and beverages.

Daimler Veers Into Maximum Overdrive

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Daimler’s Freightliner is testing its self-driving truck on Nevada’s highways as it seeks wider regulatory approval.

Daimler Veers Into Maximum Overdrive

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Daimler's self-driving trucks are now being tested in Nevada.

Greeks Face a Wall Few Nations Surmount

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

History suggests that Greece can’t maintain austerity for long.

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

Netflix Looks to the Old World for New Growth

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What plans does Netflix have for expansion in Europe?

Droid Killer?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Cheap smartphones running Firefox’s mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

A Drone Simple Enough for Anyone to Use

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

DJI’s early lead in the drone industry may put it at the center of the debate over regulation and privacy.

Merkel Gets Tough on Russia

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Germany is exploring the possibility of harsh sanctions. Will Europe follow?

Luxury Car Makers Bet on Lower-Priced Rides

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Are you looking for a Chevy or a BMW? The three major German auto manufacturers are introducing luxury sedans at lower prices than some mainstream U.S. cars.

After 90 Years, German Inflation Angst is Fading

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A wealthier generation loses its grandparents’ fear of higher prices.

BMW Has Seen the Future, and It's Carbon

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

By building its own $100 million carbon-fiber plant, BMW is making a strong commitment to producing lighter and more environmentally friendly vehicles.

Germany is Exporting Its Grandmas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With nursing home costs much lower to the east, many Germans are spending their final years outside their homeland.

Greece’s Financial Woes Are Far From Over

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Debt stands at 176 percent of GDP in Greece. No one knows how the country will pay.

The Euro Zone Loses Its Raison D’Etre

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Foreign ownership of debt in euro-area countries is dropping.

Where the Company Car Is a Porsche

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Germany's tax system, which makes company cars a valuable employee perk, is helping keep demand for high-end German cars strong.

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

When It Doesn’t Have to Be There Overnight

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Once a rail link is in timely use, it can be just as fast as air and almost as cheap as sea transportation, right?

Innovator Lothar Stitz: A Vaccine for Every Strain of the Flu

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

CureVac has gotten $190 million to develop flu vaccines.

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China is adding lots of robots to its manufacturing production lines. That's good for its competitiveness and productivity, not so good for the displaced workers.

Germany Frets as France Declines

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A Moody’s downgrade of French debt highlights France’s weakness.

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cost cutting at AB InBev has recently caused profits to climb, but sales have suffered. Is the attempt to cut costs affecting the taste of the beers AB InBev brews?

China Slows, Australia Freezes

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is Australia's economic pain more evidence of China's importance in the world economy?

Sanofi's Shock Therapy Enrages the French

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

France's Sanofi is closing R&D facilities in France and shifting research to America amid worker protests.

China Goes Shopping For German Factories

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With the economic downturn causing financial difficulties for German firms, some Chinese firms have found this to be a great time for making acquisitions.

Who Lost the Euro?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What's going on in Europe?

Daimler's Billion-Dollar Bet on Hungary

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite overcapacity in the European auto industry, Daimler has invested $1 billion in a Hungarian plant with wages a fifth of those in Germany.

Daimler's Billion-Dollar Bet on Hungary

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Daimler Benz is building a $1 billion factory in Hungary in order to lower labor costs associated with the manufacturing of its luxury cars.

The German Website Copy Machine

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By cloning U.S. internet companies in other countries, three German brothers have made millions executing business ideas born elsewhere.

Philly Cream Cheese's Spreading Appeal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Kraft Foods has revived its Philadelphia cream cheese brand, boosting international sales and adding flavors.

On Top of the World - And Out $43 Billion

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

ArcelorMittal is the world's largest steel company. Heavy debt from acquisitions is forcing the company to cut costs and conserve cash.

The Debt Crisis Could Shift to Paris

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

France's debt woes are less well known but, over the long run, may be no less severe than those of Greece.

How Swede it is

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens next for the euro?

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Focusing on internal growth rather than acquisitions, Proctor and Gamble wants to persuade more people in more places to use its brands.

Volkswagen Rediscovers America

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

VW is spending $1 billion on a Tennessee factory to boost market share in the U.S. Could it eventually become the No. 1 global carmaker?

A Downfall's Fallout

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does Europe lose in the IMF chief's downfall?

Rise of the Machines (Again)

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

U.S. companies chase the fast-growing market for service bots. In part, they're trying to catch up with European and Asian companies.

How Siemens Got Its Geist Back

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

How Siemens' bribery scandal became a catalyst for transformational change.

The Cost of Measuring Greenhouse Gases

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Starting in March, the Obama Administration will make a wide range of companies report on the greenhouse gases they produce. Naturally, there's a cost burden for affected industries and their customers.

Fixing the Global Trade System by the Numbers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Just how much pull President Obama has with Beijing may become clear when G-20 leaders meet in Seoul to consider a U.S. proposal to limit trade surpluses and deficits. It may not be enough.

The Economics of Alternative Energy

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Electricity generated from fossil fuels is starting to lose its price edge over some renewable energy sources. When will it be time for energy producers and consumers to jump on board?

The 20-Year Miracle

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Has modern Germany overcome its historical challenges?

The 20-Year Miracle

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Once the sick man of Europe, Germany is now an EU powerhouse thanks to a 20-year transformation following reunification with East Germany.

Never Miss A Good Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Shaking off disgrace and a $1.6 billion fine, the German conglomerate aims to build the world's infrastructure, especially in emerging markets.

The Zero Percent Solution

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should the Federal Reserve do with interest rates?

Greece's Weakness is its Strength

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the EU support Greece's bailout?

She's Got the Whole Euro in Her Hands

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

With Greece verging on a financial meltdown that could spread to other EU countries, Angela Merkel is going to have to tell the German people that the old ways aren't working anymore and Germany must change. Will she have the guts to do it?

She's Got the Whole Euro in Her Hands

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With Greece verging on a financial meltdown that could spread to other EU countries, Angela Merkel is going to have to tell the German people that the old ways aren't working anymore and Germany must change. Will she have the guts to do it?

She's Got the Whole Euro in Her Hands

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With Greece verging on a financial meltdown that could spread to other EU countries, Angela Merkel is going to have to tell the German people that the old ways aren't working anymore and Germany must change. Will she have the guts to do it?

Endless Oil

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is the global oil supply endless?

Greece Rattles the Euro Zone

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will Greece be the first country in the EU to default?

Toyota Gets Stuck in a Pair of Ruts

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With a strengthening yen eating into its profits, where is Toyota headed?

Toyota Gets Stuck in a Pair of Ruts

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

While a strengthening yen eats up profits, the carmaker's reputation for quality is taking a hit.

Fill 'er up-With Hydrogen

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Advances in fuel-cell technology and a commitment from the German government to build a fueling network mean automakers haven't given up on hydrogen.

The Skilled Hand Inside a Fiat Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The legendary connections of Roland Berger could help make the Fiat-Opel-Chrysler alliance happen.

Labor Market Lessons From Germany

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Since Germany's government reformed its benefits and other labor programs, unemployment has increased only slightly. The U.S. might learn a thing or two from this example.

Global Sluggishness Will Slow a U.S. Recovery

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What has globalization done to economic recovery in the U.S.?

Chipmakers on the Edge

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Awash in inventory, global semiconductor companies are in deep trouble, and some are seeking bailouts.

With a Soaring Yen, Japan Is Buying

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With a weak local market and a strong currency, many Japanese firms are taking the opportunity to make overseas investments.

Brands: Moving Overseas to Move Upmarket

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Consumer goods regarded as workaday in their home countries often gain luxury cachet when launched in a foreign land.

Stalled in the USA: Europe's Small Cars

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The strong euro and expensive labor are making it tough for BMW, VW, Volvo, and some other European carmakers to show a profit in America.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility and higher quality.

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Apple's iPhone, a blockbuster in the U.S., has not been as successful in Europe.

The iPhone in Europe: Lost in Translation

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

The iPhone's high price and strong competition from companies like Nokia have led to shipments that are far below expectations.

Dollar Daze in Europe

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The falling U.S. dollar is killing jobs and crimping profits in Europe.

Survival of the Biggest

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will U.S. airlines be able to survive as independent carriers?

The Wind at Germany's Back

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

A combination of factors in the business environment, including consistent energy policies, has facilitated development of German wind and solar industries. Now Germany is reaping social and economic rewards.

The Wind at Germany's Back

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

How did Germany get ahead in the use of renewable energy?

The Wind at Germany's Back

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Germany has taken a leading role in renewable energy as a result of government incentives and corporate investments in technology.

The Wind at Germany's Back

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Germany is a world leader in wind-generated electricity. It will be challenged to stay ahead, however, as the U.S. market is growing faster.

Siemens Braces for a Slap from Uncle Sam

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Siemens, a large German-based multinational firm, has faced significant fines in Germany for questionable payments. Now it must face U.S. regulators under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.


Feedback