Regions

China's Elusive Goal: A Global Apparel Brand

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Lulled into a false sense of security based on domestic sales results, Chinese outerwear supplier Bosideng learned that establishing an international brand is harder than it looks.

The Asian Jobs Ladder Is Broken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

For the past several decades, labor-intensive manufacturing of textiles and clothing has shifted from higher wage countries to lower wage countries, and in the process helped bring jobs and economic growth to increasingly poorer countries. With advances in technology and automation, however, that regular shift to the next country with lower pay levels may be coming to an end.

Selling China on Cheese

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign dairy companies have found it difficult to enter the Chinese consumer market with milk, butter, cheese, and other dairy products. The food-service industry, however, which supplies restaurants and cafeterias, appears to be easier to enter while having lower margins. In order to encourage Chinese chefs to use more dairy products in their cooking, foreign dairy companies are holding workshops and investing in training kitchens to help introduce dairy products to Chinese chefs.

So Many Boats, So Little Cargo

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

As commodity prices continue to lag and China’s economy continues to struggle, shipbuilders, cargo companies, and port operators are facing financial hardships as they feel the squeeze from slowing business.

The World’s Favorite New Tax Haven Is the United States

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has the United States become a prime tax shelter destination?

Swiss Watches Take a Licking

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The Swiss watch industry is lowering prices and looking to new markets. High-end Swiss luxury watches saw sales drop 3.3 percent in 2015, the first annual decline since 2009.

Your Uber Driver Has a House to Show You

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Real estate agents turn to Uber-driving amid prolonged property slump. Cars for hire increased 51 percent in the first half of 2015.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Saying it has learned from experience in Paris and Hong Kong, Disney has gone to much greater lengths to tailor its new park in Shanghai to Chinese culture and society. Yet retaining an authentic Disney experience may be key to succeeding in China’s increasingly competitive amusement-park industry.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Disney is preparing to open a new theme park outside Shanghai that blends standard Disney features with Chinese themes. It also has to adapt to the Chinese demographic, where, as a result of the one-child policy, it is expected that there will be four adults for every one child at the park.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Love Boats

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the current state of the market for cruise lines in Asia, and how will it change in the future?

Philippine Customs Is Getting Scared Straight

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A new Philippine customs commissioner is cracking down on bribery and corruption.

Asia's Budget Airline Invasion

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

As incomes rise among tens of millions of consumers across Asia, so does the number of low-fare airlines competing for their business.

The J.Crew Invasion

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

J.Crew is invading London with American style at a higher price point. Will it succeed where others have failed?

Saving Elephants with Google Earth

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Drones are helping keep Kenyan elephants away from poachers. They can’t help with Kenya’s booming population.

Hong Kong's Bosses Want Some Privacy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Should the identities of Hong Kong companies' directors remain public?

Gimme Shelter

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Which countries are now the most popular tax havens?

Does Green Shipping Cost Too Much Green?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Maersk, the world's largest container shipping company, is finding that doing the right thing environmentally can sometimes be a challenge. The company has put itself at a considerable cost disadvantage by using low-sulfur fuel at Hong Kong's very busy and very polluted port.

Does Green Shipping Cost Too Much Green?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Shipper Maersk says Hong Kong’s reduced port charges for ships that use "clean," low-sulfur fuel cover only 40 percent of the added cost of going green, and it wants something done about it.

Does Green Shipping Cost Too Much Green?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The world's biggest container shipping company argues for more pollution-related regulation of its industry.

At Abercrombie & Fitch, Sex No Longer Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Abercrombie & Fitch appears to have lost its retail edge and will close 180 stores through 2015. Does sex no longer sell?

'Made in Cambodia' - For Now

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's share of the developed world's textile imports is dropping as lower-wage competitors in Southeast Asia increase production.

Disney Gets a Second Chance in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By focusing more on local culture, Disney has high hopes for its new theme park near Shanghai.

How not to Sweat the Retail Details

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A Hong Kong-based sourcer is handling factory contracting for more and more U.S. brands that discover it can do the job better. But will political problems arise?

Wireless Web Phones for Less Than $50

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

A new subsidiary of Hutchison Whampoa, INQ, plans to make ultracheap mobile phones for surfing the Net.

Free Papers, Costly Competition

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

These are difficult times in the free (advertising-based) newspaper industry. The industry leader has been Metro International, which has expanded to more than 70 cities worldwide but lost $32.7 million on sales of $314 million in the first nine months of 2007.


Feedback