Regions

The Trump-Valley Fight Starts to Take Shape

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

President Donald Trump's executive order draft discusses overhauling work-visa programs. The Trump administration has drafted an executive order that would limit tech hiring of foreign workers. These reforms could impact how tech companies recruit employees.

IBM’s Big Jobs Dodge

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

While IBM talks about Trump-pleasing hiring plans, it's firing thousands. IBM pledged to hire 25,000 workers over four years, but it's continuing to fire American workers and move their jobs abroad. It wasn't long before employees were accusing the company's CEO of hypocrisy.

Pharma's Worst Nightmare

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Celebration of Trump’s victory by pharmaceutical executives turned to fear when he suggested they should bid for the government’s business as well as bring manufacturing back to the U.S. But Trump will have to overcome the powerful pharmaceutical lobby to get such measures through the Republican Congress.

The Sundance Kid

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

How Shivani Rawat, a 31-year-old Indian American woman, became the "it" indie producer.

TFW Your Country’s Shredding Money and You Own a Payment App

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Fintech upstart Paytm is leveraging an anti-corruption campaign to establish itself as India's dominant digital payments player. It wants to be India's first $100 billion company by value.

A Startup That Dare Not Speak Its Name

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Exploring Your Potential

Despite enviable financial metrics, e-commerce startup That’s Personal has not drawn the attention of a single big investor. Perhaps it’s because they sell adult products in a country that is not too fond of such products, even 2,000 years after the Kama Sutra was published.

The Great Indian Tax Dodge of 2016

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Planeloads of cash seek to turn India's black money white. Winning support for demonetization and implementing it effectively is crucial for Prime Minister Narendra Modi before key state elections next year and a national poll in 2019.

The Great Indian Tax Dodge of 2016

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Last month, India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, announced the sudden banning of the country's 500 and 1,000 rupee notes in an attempt to clean up the black economy. As Indians struggle with the demonetization of 86 percent of the country's currency, money-laundering networks are spreading across the country. Bills by the crateload are transported by planes, trains, and cars in an attempt by people to turn their cash hoards into legal tender.

A Cash Crackdown Hits Gold Pawners

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

India remains the world’s second-largest gold consumer after China; it now has more than 20,000 tons of the precious metal. India’s government wants the economy to be less reliant on cash and especially gold, which many Indians use to store their wealth. Gold is seen as the poor man’s credit card, and Indians struggle to find valid currency to repay their loans.

Namaste. Now Try My Herbal Toothpaste.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Global personal care product companies such as Unilever and Colgate-Palmolive have started to see their market share in India decline, as local firms offering natural ayurvedic products grab market share. Focusing on all-natural ingredients, and using marketing based on yoga-gurus and an emphasis on balance in life, firms such as Patanjali have continued to gain market share. Patanjali has grown to hold more than 1 percent of India's market, with its principal owner now worth about $2.5 billion. More local competition is entering the market, and the large conglomerates are starting their own lines of ayurvedic products.

India’s Cash-Canceling Experiment

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

By immediately ceasing to accept the 500-rupee and 1,000-rupee notes as legal tender, India Prime Minister Modi is trying to end tax evasion and impose a tax-compliant, above-board economy at all levels. His vision of the new economy would expand banks’ deposits and install an almost cash-free transaction system.

The Prenup That Didn't Stick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

NTT Docomo is trying to exercise a clause in its joint venture agreement with Tata Group that would allow NTT Docomo to exit the joint venture with at least half of its original investment. It has even received a court ruling in support of this, and Tata has agreed to make the payment. India’s central bank, however, has blocked the payment, leaving the joint venture and both parties in legal limbo.

The Cheap Phone Is Dead In China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's domestic smartphone makers are gaining worldwide market share. While the growth of Apple and Samsung in worldwide markets has slowed, Vivo, Oppo, TCL and Xiaomi are all growing. These companies are not just counting on growing sales in China, however, but also have their sites set on India and other growing markets.

The ABCs of India's GST

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

GST, or goods and services taxes, are being implemented world-wide as a replacement to traditional income taxes. India's new tax joins the chorus of countries making the big switch. But what does it mean to aspiring tax students?

Como se dice 'Uber'?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After ceding China, Uber, the ride-hailing giant, plans to double its presence in Latin America by the end of 2017. As long as Uber’s competitors there try to make money on each ride, the region will remain far more affordable for Uber than India or China.

Asia Is a Growth Market For Military Aircraft

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign sales are becoming increasingly important to U.S.-based defense contractors. Many Asian countries are ramping up their defense spending, while U.S. defense spending on new systems remains relatively flat. As part of a proposal to win sales in India, Lockheed-Martin and Boeing have both indicated that they will manufacture fighter jets in India rather than simply exporting them from the U.S.

India Gets a Deadpool. No, Not That Kind.

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Venture capitalists and/or investors sometimes lose their confidence in their startups and are reluctant to put more money into the venture. This leaves the entity in a spot where they are unable to attain the necessary growth to succeed. Tracxn Technologies, an Indian firm, posts a list of struggling startups that still show potential for investors to try and facilitate a match.

Is the U.S. Missing the TPP Train?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership has competition from the Chinese-led Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Both agreements have their boosters and detractors. The conflict illustrates how economics and politics are globally intertwined and are on the political front burner this election year.

Stranded by Saudi Austerity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Low oil prices are leading to a reduction in construction projects in Saudi Arabia. Thus, Saudi construction companies are cutting back on employment, as their cash flow suffers. Caught in the fray are foreign construction workers who aren't getting paid, can't send remittances back to family, and can't get exit visas to leave Saudi Arabia.

Amazon Gains on Flipkart in India

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Amazon gains on Flipkart in India. Hobbled by self-inflicted wounds and a price war, the Indian e-commerce company is girding for battle with a deep-pocketed rival.

Amazon Gains on Flipkart in India

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

India is attracting multinational retailers like Amazon. Local competitors are working hard to maintain their lead.

Amazon Gains on Flipkart in India

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Flipkart's new CEO, Binny Bansal, is facing a tough challenge from retailer Amazon in the Indian e-commerce market. Bansal's leadership, focusing on reducing costs and improving efficiencies, is what the company needs as it tries to simultaneously cut costs and increase marketshare. While Amazon has been aggressive in signing up third-party retailers to its network, Flipkart has emphasized customer service and building customer loyalty.

India Is Cutting Oil Deals Worldwide

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's oil consumption is growing at a 10 percent rate, with gasoline consumption growing even faster. The country, however, imports 75 percent of its oil due to limited domestic supplies. It is working with governments and oil companies in a diverse set of countries, including Iran, Mozambique, Russia, and Afghanistan, to help make sure it has a secure supply of oil to fuel its growing economy.

A Would-Be Wi-Fi Paradise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sri Lanka is working with Google to provide Wi-Fi service country-wide. As part of the system, Google is launching Wi-Fi equipment that is attached to balloons that can provide service to remote locations. Providing Wi-Fi will help more residents get online, but the next challenge is providing sufficient capacity of high-speed internet connections to and from the island nation.

Tesla Takes on the Dealerships—and GM

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

There is a struggle in state legislatures over the right of Tesla to sell cars directly to consumers. In Indiana, legislation is being pushed that would force Tesla to find a franchisee.

D-Mart Solves India’s Retail Riddle

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Nearly all supermarket chains lose money in India. However, D-Mart woos Indians with promises of all-year discounts and its cheap grocery prices fuel sales of higher-margin goods.

You Won't Find GrubHub Here

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Sometimes all the infrastructural elements are in place for leading industry transformation, allowing entrepreneurs to enter a market. It's also possible that some sociocultural (as well as economic) structural impediments keep the obvious from taking place, at least in the short run.

Payday Lenders On the Run

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Many players in the high-cost loan industry are eager to get out as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau readies new regulations that it says will stop borrowers from taking short-term loans they can't afford. Some loans have interest rates as high as 780 percent.

Facing a Price War, Uber Bets on Volume

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How is Uber’s income affected by the company's continued trend of lowering fare prices every January for the last three years?

Facebook’s Fight to Be Free

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

In India, Mark Zuckerberg cannot give Internet access away. Facebook’s free data plan in India faces strong opposition from local businesses and Internet freedom advocates. The Indian fight with Facebook could set the tone for Free Basics debate in other countries.

Facebook's Fight to Be Free

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Facebook is trying to expand Internet access. Online access is an issue in India.

Insuring the Toys of the Wealthy

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Writing insurance policies for the possessions of the 1 Percent is a $40 billion business. Privilege Underwriters Reciprocal Exchange, which specializes in insuring the ultrarich, has seen its business grow least 40 percent a year since 2006.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Telecom giant SoftBank is building a massive investment arm that could spread as much as $3 billion among only 5 to 10 late-stage startups each year. This strategy differs from most other venture capital investors by concentrating risk in a few large investments without limited partners in an attempt to find the next Google.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Nikesh Arora is putting SoftBank on a path to invest billions in startups over the next few years. He has also shown his confidence in this plan by investing hundreds of millions of dollars of his own money in SoftBank.

SoftBank's $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Masayoshi Son, Chief Executive Officer of SoftBank, hired Nikesh Arora from Google to help the company invest $3 billion per year in promising startups with high end potential. Unlike most pools like this, they are not using a shotgun approach with the money, rather they are going to focus huge amounts of cash on around 10 startups. This Bloomberg Businessweek article gives personal insight into Arora and his frame of mind as well as his philosophies on risk.

Make it Rain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Weather Modification Inc., a North Dakota-based company, has built a global business in cloud seeding. While its pilots and planes fly all over the world doing cloud seeding, it also offers consulting services to help governments and local contractors develop their own ability to stimulate precipitation.

An App Gives India's Hotels a Closer Look

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Oyo Rooms is a hotel-booking app for India's hotels. Room seekers can choose a room based on their required standards.

Smartphone Margins

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Apple claims 90 percent of the smartphone industry’s profits. Although other firms offer very competitive phones, so far they seem to be eroding one another's positions -- not Apple's.

Smartphone Margins

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

In the ultra-competitive smartphone manufacturing market, Apple gobbles up close to 90 percent of industry profits, while Samsung takes the majority of the rest. So why do the other manufacturers continue to compete?

Indian Casino Bets Pay Off for Och-Ziff

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Indian casino investments helped an Och-Ziff fund return almost 23 percent from 2011 through June 2015. The hedge fund offers expensive loans to tribes with limited options. It leases slot machines and gets as much as 20 percent of net revenue.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Bollywood film studio Eros hopes to build a strong enough position in video streaming to fend off Netflix and Amazon when they enter India. With a large library of its own films, original programs, music videos, and a head start, Eros wants to be the dominant streaming service in India.

Eros Would Love to Become India’s Netflix

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

One of Bollywood's biggest studios, Eros, is betting it can win the online streaming race. The idea is to use the Mumbai studio’s bulging catalog of more than 2,000 films and new, exclusive series to build a critical mass of devoted users before Netflix and Amazon plant their flags in the world’s second-most populous country.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Eros is one of Bollywood's largest studios, releasing around 70 movies a year. Hoping to attain a first-mover advantage in advance of foreign rivals such as Amazon and Netflix, Eros is launching a video streaming service.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Dairy farms around the world are suffering from declining milk prices. A combination of reduced Chinese demand for imported milk and Russia’s ban on EU, American, and Australian milk has left the global market awash with milk. As a result, global dairy prices are falling with no turnaround in sight.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

Cleaning Up Drug Lane

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Unregulated supply chains and poor record keeping make it easy for counterfeit drugs to find their way into stores in many developing countries. MPedigree, a Ghana-based company, works with manufacturers to place scratch-off security codes on drug boxes to help consumers find out if the product is legitimate.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Growth in China’s market of 400 million smartphone users has almost flattened, leaving manufacturers scrambling.The decline is particularly bad news for Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi, which has been dependent upon the rapidly growing domestic market.

The Smartphone Shields Are Down

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The large smartphone companies have done well in recent years, with rising sales and profits. Part of the reason for their success is the growing market for smartphones in China. However, the smartphone market in China may be reaching saturation, with most consumers who want and can afford a smartphone already owning one.

How Much Should a Miracle Cost?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Gilead Science’s value-based pricing for its new cure for Hepatitis C may be more than the market can bear.

U.S. Carmakers Take Different Roads In Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Two competitors, two different strategies in Russia.

Changing Flags to Use India’s Ship Graveyard

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Rather than shifting demolition work to safer and cleaner shipbreakers, recent EU regulations may be fueling the growth of India’s dangerous and dirty shipbreaking industry.

Changing Flags to Use India's Ship Graveyard

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Old European ships find their way to scrapyards in India, working around EU regulations.

Felon or Mark?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

An outspoken advocate of ethics and fighting corruption is now facing trial for bribery. Is Joe Sigelman guilty or a scapegoat?

India's Discount Airlines Get An Upscale Rival

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's airlines have lost $10 billion over the past seven years, but that doesn't keep more airlines from entering the market.

Man Buys Phone, Gets a Brick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Websites, warehouses, and shipping companies in India can't keep up with e-commerce demand.

Outsourcing: Loss of U.S. Manufacturing Jobs Picked Up Speed

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcing has been taking place for longer than most U.S. college students have been alive.

India's Farming Women Pick Up the Cameras

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Is there a prejudicial element in gender-based assistance programs for agricultural improvement?

In India, Amazon and Its Rivals Tread Lightly

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Merchants say e-commerce companies in India, flush with foreign capital, are violating rules meant to protect locals.

In India, Amazon and Its Rivals Tread Lightly

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Amazon and local e-commerce firms in India try to work around rules designed to protect small shopkeepers from foreign-backed retailers.

India vs. China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India is becoming increasingly attractive to manufacturers, although it is still in need of infrastructure improvements.

India vs. China

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The battle for global manufacturing heats up.

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Once the market leader in both China and India, Samsung phones are losing marketshare to cheaper models.

Samsung’s China Problems Come to India

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cheaper smartphones eat away at the South Korean company's lead.

Samsung's China Problems Come to India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Samsung is losing ground to a wave of Chinese and local smartphone upstarts in India, where it has led for years.

Datsun's Second Life Isn't So Good, After All

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Resurrected in emerging markets, Datsun's cars are viewed as too cheap.

Reining in Goat Funds to Curtail Fraud in India

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

SEBI is cracking down on collective-investment funds that take money from small investors to put in anything from time-share resorts to mango orchards to goat farms. It has targeted 54 unregistered companies controlling $10.6 billion since May 2013.

High-End Motorcycles Meet India's Mopeds

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Erik Buell Racing, maker of powerful trophy motorcycles for the rich, will add low-priced bikes made by Hero MotoCorp of India to its line next year.

High-End Motorcycles Meet India's Mopeds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India’s largest maker of two-wheeled vehicles is investing $25 million in Erik Buell’s latest bike venture.

Xiaomi Takes Direct Aim at the iPhone

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Xiaomi's smartphones emphasize technology over marketing, and are making inroads in Asian markets.

Flipkart’s Fight to Maintain Its Lead in India

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Despite trade restrictions that bar foreign retailers, Amazon and EBay have entered the Indian market and are about to overtake Flipkart, the Indian market leader.

Flipkart's Fight to Maintain Its Lead in India

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Delivering in a city with no street address system. Can it be done?

Droid Killer?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Cheap smartphones running Firefox’s mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

Welcome to Thailand, Land of Coups

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Governmental instability in Thailand is dampening foreign investment and economic growth.

The Law of Gravity Isn't Working for This Generic

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

A prescription drug’s price typically falls by as much as 50 percent when a generic version is first introduced.

I’ll Pass

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Convertibles, long a symbol of fun and freedom, are going the way of the Model T.

Good for Kids, Good for Publishers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

First Book Marketplace accounted for 2 percent of all juvenile books sold in the United States last year to an unlikely audience at a surprising price. Why is everyone involved winning?

The Epic Hack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Target's security monitors in India noticed the malware on its U.S. servers almost immediately, but the red flags were ignored.

India's Diesel Cars Are Proving Lethal

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The Indian government is spending about $15 billion annually to subsidize dirty diesel fuel that is likely to give the country the blue ribbon for most cities with the worst air quality in the world.

India Decides Software is Not Enough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With Indian electronics imports reaching $33.5 billion in 2013, the government wants to develop a domestic chip industry.

French Beret Makers: Then There Was One

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The last French beret maker expects to make almost 200,000 this year. France used to produce millions.

Amazon and EBay Inch Into India

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Amazon and EBay are eager to get in early in the rapidly growing Indian market, and they aren’t waiting for the government to allow them in.

Amazon and EBay Inch Into India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Regulations prevent foriegn-backed firms from operating retail facilities in India, but Amazon and EBay have managed to gain a small foothold by providing the "marketplace" for local firms to sell using the American companies' websites and warehouses.

A Lucrative Promise for India's Men: Whiter Skin

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

About 25 percent of skin care sales in India are from creams that promise to lighten skin color.

Wal-Mart’s New Chief Faces Old Woes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for Wal-Mart now that Doug McMillon has taken over?

Discount iPhones Come to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to spur customers to use more data and decrease switching carriers, Reliance Communications is offering highly subsidized iPhones if customers agree to a two-year contract.

Bad Loans Could Spark an Emerging-Markets Crisis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for the debt of emerging-markets corporations?

Who Wants Hot Fudge On Their Veggies?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

India’s biggest milk producer is having a hard time differentiating its ice cream treats from Unilever’s milkless frozen treats. Consumers don’t seem to notice the difference.

Need a New Building? Call the Philippines

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Construction outsourcing can help companies reduce costs by as much as 20 percent.

Exports Won’t Give India an Easy Way Out

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Despite a two-year drop in the rupee’s value, India’s trade deficit is 9 percent of GDP.

An Indian Tractor Maker Tries to Run LIke a Deere

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mahindra is exporting small tractors to the United States, trying to break into the market with better warranties and more attractive financing.

India’s Onion Crisis

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The nation fights a losing battle against inflation—particularly in the price of a culinary favorite.

Asia's Bitter Harvest

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The market for palm oil is expanding, but human rights abuses are rampant in this industry.

Nissan Brings Datsun Back to the Future

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

It worked before, and Nissan is betting it will work again. Nissan is dusting off its Datsun brand and will sell cars starting at less than $6,650 in Indonesia, Russia, and South Africa.

An Indian Banker Steps Out of the Shadows

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's shadow banking industry has created opportunities for financial institutions that operate just outside of banking regulations.

Getting Its 787s Back Is No Panacea for Air India

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The return of its Boeing 787s may not be enough to turn around the inefficient and heavily subsidized Air India.

Thailand's Farmer-Friendly Policy Blows Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In an effort to win support from farmers, the Thai government raised the price of rice and effectively killed exports.

The World's Cheapest Car Runs Out of Gas

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Tata Motors' Nano was supposed to appeal to the masses by being the lowest-priced car. As it turns out, the "cheap car" image has not been the magic marketing approach Tata expected.

The World's Cheapest Car Runs Out of Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

At less than $3,000, the Tata Nano may be too cheap.

India's EBay Just Got Some Help - From EBay

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's internet and transportation infrastructure creates a few different challenges for e-commerce retailers.

A Chinese Implant Takes Aim at Cochlear

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

What did you say? There's huge profits in helping people hear?

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

M.A.C. cosmetics finds sales opportunities for its high-end products in ethnic areas and emerging markets.

Mr. Free Market, Raghuram Rajan, Goes to India

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

A Chicago School free-marketer is advising India’s government on reforming the economy. His work may take decades.

Estee Lauder Launches its Own M.A.C. Attack

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Estee Lauder is using its M.A.C. cosmetics line, a hit with ethnic consumers at home, to enter emerging markets.

Things Fall Apart. IBM Is Here to Help

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Africa presents many opportunities for IBM, while also carrying risks.

In India, Penny Lane Costs You Pennies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to boost growth in India, Apple lowers prices while still maintaining a premium pricing strategy.

Gimme Shelter

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Which countries are now the most popular tax havens?

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

Unilever: Taking on the World, One Stall at a Time

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By emphasizing market share and having brands across many price points, Unilever is expanding in emerging markets.

China’s Smartphone Market Welcomes Dumbphones

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China is now the world’s largest smartphone market and home to Lenovo, the world’s biggest PC vendor. In 2013, Lenovo is working to get every phone sale possible. Look out Apple?

Charlie Rose Talks to Kenneth Rogoff

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Kenneth Rogoff has found that debt levels of 90-100% of GDP for a country will slow the country’s future GDP growth. Does he think the United States is going the way of Greece or Japan?

In India, a Facebook and Free-Speech Debate

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The difference between online "free speech" and "hate speech" is being debated in India.

The Problem With Patching Up the Tax Code

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Is it possible to significantly reduce the budget deficit by cutting loopholes?

India's Reform Gains Credibility

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While India is an attractive market, navigating through the complexities of its multiple layers of government bureaucracy has been difficult for many foreign firms. Recent attempts by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to liberalize retailing was met with strong resistance by partners in his coalition government.

Indian Companies Seek A Passage to America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As Americans customers ask their software subcontractors to hire more U.S.-based employees, Indian firms struggle to find enough qualified Americans.

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

Asia's Growing Thirst For Gut-Cleaning Drinks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Saying that a yogurt product helps create intestinal flora or has health benefits helps drive growth in Asia.

Can a Harvard MBA Fix India’s Economy?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

India’s new finance minister hopes to spur growth with lower rates and policies to restore investor confidence.

P&G Woos the Hearts, Minds, and Schools of Vietnam

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Can extensive and intensive marketing make P&G the market leader in Vietnam?

India Finds New Ways to Tax Foreign Investors

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With India's governmental deficits running at 8 percent of GDP, foreign investors are finding that they may be targeted for new sources of revenue.

Want Some Milk With Your Green Tea Oreos?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Kraft Foods found global success with Oreos after adapting them to local tastes. Do globally standardized strategies still make sense?

Freeing Your Cell Phone from African Warlords

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Supply chains are being reinvented in order to certify that electronics do not contain minerals whose extraction contribute to the financing of conflict in central Africa.

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China shifts its export focus from shoes and t-shirts to heavy industry.

Outsourcing: A Passage Out of India

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As U.S. corporations outsource more skilled white-collar jobs, they increasingly are looking beyond India to closer places with well-educated labor pools.

Outsourcing: A Passage Out of India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As more high-skilled jobs are outsourced, corporations seek locations closer to home.

Miracle, Interrupted

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can India's economy emerge as a global superpower?

Miracle, Interrupted

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's economic miracle seems to be stalling, but just as the hype over success may have been overstated, the frequent references to demise may be also overstated.

Mitt Romney's Box of Kryptonite

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Does the economics of creative destruction work?

Made in China Makes India Uneasy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China exports to India twice as much as India exports to China, stirring concerns that Indian industries face trade barriers in China.

Main Street Masala

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Cafe Spice has built a successful business providing Indian food to U.S. cafeterias and supermarkets. But will its low-risk entry strategy of placing branded kiosks in such locations position it for success in the U.S. fast-food business?

Got Buffalo Milk? Glaxo Does, and India Loves It

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A 138-year-old drink made from buffalo milk and barley outsells the colas in India.

In India, Inflation is a Rutted Road

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Poor infrastructure, including congested roads and insufficient electricity, drive up costs for manufacturers in India.

A False Brigade

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the emerging economies save Europe?

Welcome to India, the Land of the Drug Reps

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

What explains the rapidly rising population of pharmaceutical sales reps?

Qualcomm Rewires for India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To make inroads in India's mobile phone market, Qualcomm is assisting domestic handset makers and operators, and buying 4G spectrum.

A Hunger Striker Takes on India's Government

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The costs of government corruption are high. Will a popular anti-corruption movement in India lead to real change?

Yankee Chicken Go Home!

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would you move an oversupply of dark meat?

In India, Tax Evasion is a National Sport

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The United States is blessed with a relatively high tax compliance rate, while many other countries have a lower rate of compliance. What are the reasons for this difference, and what is India doing about it?

You've Got Mail ... and It's from India's PM

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Use your free e-mail account, even for official government business.

Can Alan Mulally Take Ford's Show on the Road?

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

China is central to Ford's growth plans. The softness of the Chinese market, however, may make those goals hard to achieve.

In India, Power Thieves Are Everywhere

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

In India, widespread theft of electricity makes blackouts common.

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Focusing on internal growth rather than acquisitions, Proctor and Gamble wants to persuade more people in more places to use its brands.

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Procter & Gamble's new CEO plans to increase revenue by expanding sales of existing products rather than through acquisitions.

The Scrappiest Car Manufacturer in America

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

For Subaru Indiana Automotive, dumpster diving has been good for business.

The Scrappiest Car Manufacturer in America

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Zero layoffs, zero pay cuts, zero waste. Subaru manages to pull off the seemingly impossible.

A Push for Arizona-Style Laws Stalls Out

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Tougher enforcement faces resistance from businesses that want to be allowed to continue to hire illegal immigrants - even when the unemployment rate is high in the U.S.

The Arms Race Against the Pirates

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As piracy has become an identifiable risk in the Indian Ocean, shippers, insurers, defense forces and pirates are all availing themselves of new technology and tactics.

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

Keeping Women on the Job in India

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Large multinational companies in India are using a variety of family-friendly perks to keep women on career tracks.

From Brewing, an Indian Biotech is Born

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In the wake of its deal with Pfizer, Biocon is positioned to take advantage of the world's increasing diabetes problem.

An Indian Tycoon Takes a Tumble

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Reliance Communications is facing the high costs of losing investor confidence.

In India, 101 Employees Pose Big Problems

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's labor laws deter businesses from hiring more than 100 workers, except in some exempt industries. This limits Indian firms from competing in some industries with high economies of scale.

If Demography Is Destiny, Then India Has the Edge

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Research shows working-age populations are slipping in the U.S. and other industrialized nations while those of other countries are growing faster.

Food: Freaky Weather, Scary Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While food may be consumed locally, it is grown worldwide. The price of groceries in the U.S. is directly impacted by the weather in Argentina, Russia, Australia and everywhere else in the world.

Driving in India: Cars, Corruption, Collisions

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The number of cars on the road in India is growing, but fatalities far exceed those in other countries. Should car manufacturers continue to sell inexpensive models without safety features?

The Sick-Day Bounty Hunters

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As an alarming number of workers play hooky, some enterprises are clamping down and calling in the detectives.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The Filipino workforce, well trained in English, is luring call center operations from Bangalore and Gurgaon. Cost-conscious operations managers should take note.

So Long, Bangalore; Now Manila's on the Line

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the call center business, the Philippines studied India's success and has now overtaken it in revenue.

Private Equity's Indian Dilemma

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

New regulations and caps on interest rates have made the sector less appetizing for private equity investors.

India's Ancient Spice Markets Heat Up

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While the spice trade may have spurred world exploration, growing affluence in India is driving up prices.

India Revives an Old Plan for New Growth

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India is trying to catch up to China by building special economic zones that promote manufacturing and exports.

Small Fish Devouring Other Small Fish

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Emerging-market telecoms are driving the latest round of buyouts.

India Outsourcers Feel Unloved in the U.S.

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A ban on offshoring Ohio government IT projects feels like the thin edge of the wedge in Bangalore. Is Ohio being stupid?

Corporate India Finds Greener Pastures—in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Indian companies, faced with increasing competition and bureaucratic obstacles at home, are looking to Africa for growth.

Coke's Last Round

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sales are flat in developed countries. For Coke to keep growing, Africa is it.

Coke's Last Round

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The developed world can't drink any more Coke, and India and China are saturated with competitors. That leaves Africa as the last great growth opportunity for Coke.

Coke's Last Round

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sales are flat in developed countries. For Coke to keep growing, Africa is it.

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

India's Bitter Choice: Water for Steel or Food?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

There is competition in India for water, required both by local farmers and by foreign developers of steel mills.

Never Miss A Good Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Shaking off disgrace and a $1.6 billion fine, the German conglomerate aims to build the world's infrastructure, especially in emerging markets.

Online Startups Target College Book Costs

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

A wave of startups such as Flat World Knowledge hopes to use technology to change the economics of higher education

'Rural Outsourcers' Vs. Bangalore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rural middle America costs less than the East and West Coast, and is easier to deal with than India or Russia

For India's Consumers, Pepsi Is the Real Thing

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How did Pepsi become the generic name for soft drink in India?

For India's Consumers, Pepsi Is the Real Thing

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In India, the word Pepsi has come to mean anything foreign, fizzy, and bottled, giving Pepsi cola the leading market share.

For India's Consumers, Pepsi Is the Real Thing

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

It entered the market just as Indians were engaging with the West.

An IPO for India's Top Lender to the Poor

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

SKS, India's top lender to the poor, may trigger a spate of IPOs in microlending

The World's Most Caffeinated Country

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Coffee consumption and economic growth appear to be linked.

Building a Wharton for Emerging Economies

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

In just nine years the Indian School of Business has become the leading business school in India by focusing on emerging markets

Building a Wharton for Emerging Economies

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Indian School of Business aims to be the best at teaching how to manage in developing markets

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Ford make up for lost time in Asia?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting production, as well as investment and marketing, in fast-growing China and India

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why is it critical for Ford to be well-positioned in the Asia-Pacific auto market?

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Ford is making up for lost time, boosting investment, production, and marketing in fast-growing China and India

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting investment, production, and marketing in fast-growing China and India

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

Deadly Business in Moscow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The lawlessness of the legal system can make business in Russia difficult.

Deadly Business in Moscow

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Russia has fallen out of favor with international investors because of its corruption and abuse of business people.

Don't Underestimate India's Consumers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Western multinationals are often attracted to China's size, but they're bypassing Asia's true shopping powerhouse.

The Return of the Outsourced Job

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To boost employment, local governments are wooing Indian companies such as Tata, Wipro, and Infosys.

Why Copenhagen Will Be Good for Business

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A deal at the climate conference could tip the balance toward renewable energy sources and offer opportunities for companies, albeit while hurting other enterprises and delaying U.S. energy independence.

From India, the Latest Management Fad

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Called jugaad, India's improvisational style of invention focuses on being fast and cheap, attributes that might be just right for these times.

Should Developing Nations Clamp Down on Hot Money?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Capital controls may be making a comeback as countries try to control inflationary bubbles.

Vodafone's Indian Dilemma

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's signing up plenty of new customers, but a price war is killing margins.

Indian vs. Chinese Autos: No Contest

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's exports are pulling ahead, thanks to quality and engineering that China's carmakers don't match.

The World’s Factories are Hardly Humming

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Manufacturing around the world largely remains in decline. Relatively speaking, how is the U.S. doing?

What's Holding India Back

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How will India move its economy forward?

What's Holding India Back

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Business is battling farmers over land, putting $98 billion in investments

The Peril and Promise of Investing in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's still risky, but for global corporations, the country is simply too big - and too rich - to ignore.

Tata: Clawed by Jaguar and Land Rover

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Not only is it a tough market for high-priced cars, India-based Tata Motors is finding some new challenges in working with the British government and European regulations following its acquisition of Jaguar and Land Rover.

Indian IPOs Sizzle, but for How Long?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Big foreign investors are snapping up issues, but overpricing is spooking small investors.

A New Hot Spot in India

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With its Communist leadership out, the former Calcutta may be poised for economic growth.

Using the Slump to Get Bigger in Bangalore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's info tech leaders are seizing on the downturn to become global players, but they have a long way to go.

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Mobile-phone chipmaker Qualcomm and startup Zeebo are introducing an inexpensive gaming console that will focus on what marketers dub the next billion. These consumers live in developing nations, have rising incomes and modest savings, and together spend $1 trillion annually.

Behind Mittal's Wrenching Cuts

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As it forces the steel industry to idle plants worldwide, ArcelorMittal is streamlining itself for the future. Is it setting a good example for other producers?

What the Nano Means to India

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In a country where cars have largely been unaffordable, the $2,000 Tata Nano is making autos affordable to many.

The Sudden Chill at an Indian Hotspot

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Gurgaon, a suburb of Delhi, is suffering from a wave of layoffs as Western companies retrench.

India Inc. Frets as Elections Loom

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

An anti-business coalition could slow the kind of economic reforms that have spurred growth.

A Bid to Reconnect With America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nokia gets rave reviews around the world, and its global market share is increasing. Now it's out to boost its low U.S. market share.

Inspiration From Emerging Economies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Innovation used to trickle down from rich countries to developing markets. Now it is starting to flow the other way.

A Narrowing Window for Foreign Workers?

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

There continue to be accusations of fraud and abuse in the H1-B program in the form of overuse by outsourcing firms and lowering American wages.

Corporate India's Governance Crisis

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

The Satyam fraud and a lack of transparency could damage reputations and slow India's economic growth.

A Scandal Shakes India's Outsourcers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The Satyam chairman's admission of fraud could impact the reputation of all of India's outsourcing firms.

Is Silicon Valley Losing its Magic?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Silicon Valley still deliver financing and innovation?

How Risky is India?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How risky is global business?

How Risky is India?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In the wake of the Mumbai siege, businesses must weigh the persistence of political violence against the strength and promise of the Indian miracle.

How Risky is India?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the wake of the Mumbai siege, businesses must weigh the persistence of political violence against the strength and promise of the Indian miracle.

What's Driving Up the Dollar

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A flight to safety, in particular, is overpowering dismal U.S. economic news.

Info Tech Is So Yesterday

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Indian design startups are booming as offshore and domestic customers seek an edge.

Cisco's Brave New World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cisco, the technology company that sells everything from million-dollar routers to videoconferencing systems, also has consulting services to help companies and countries upgrade their infrastructure.

The New Silk Road

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Historic bonds between the Middle East and Asia are being revitalized in a torrent of trade and investment in energy, infrastructure, and manufacturing.

Bangalore Backlash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The tech boom has brought highways, high-rises, malls, and nightclubs. Now many locals want their once-tranquil city back.

Outsourcing Shops Feel the Street's Pain

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Info-tech spending in India by U.S. financial-services firms could shrink 15% to 20% over the next year.

Outsourcing Shops Feel the Street's Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As U.S. financial services firms cut back on information technology spending, it will impact India's software firms.

Outsourcing Shops Feel the Street's Pain

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The financial crisis is hurting the Indian info tech outsourcing industry. That may change as tougher times force Wall Street to cut costs.

Philanthropy by Design

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

There are opportunities in poor countries to develop innovative products that solve local problems.

Outsourcing the Drug Industry

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Migration of the pharma research jobs

Outsourcing the Drug Industry

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. drug companies are rushing to partner with Chinese and Indian drug companies, tapping their brain power, low costs, and quick work.

Global Office Space is in the Basement

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The ripple effects of the U.S. credit crunch are impacting developers and banks in Shanghai, London, Tokyo and virtually everywhere else.

Tata's Nano Hits a Speed Bump

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Tata really manufacture a car for $2,500?

All Eyes on India's Nuclear Prize

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India plans to build 30 new nuclear reactors over the next 10 years, but American firms will have a difficult time winning many contracts.

Mom-and-Pop Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Improved software and services allow even small firms and entreprenurs to outsource tasks to firms and individuals worldwide.

Mom-and-Pop Multinationals

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Improved software and services allow the smallest businesses to outsource work around the globe.

Bulking up: Japan's drugmakers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japanese drugmakers are on an overseas acquisition binge to get bigger. For the first time, they pose a competitive threat to the big Western firms.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility and higher quality.

Dow Chemical: Liable for Bhopal?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although Dow Chemical played no part in the 1984 disaster at Bhopal, India, many in India want to make it take some responsibility.

Why HP's Deal is a Head-Scratcher

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will HP's purchase of EDS allow it to move forward in competing with IBM?

Why HP's Deal is a Head-Scratcher

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Hewlett-Packard (HP) announced last week that it intends to buy Electronic Data Systems (EDS) for $13.9 billion. Many people consider this a bold move by HP CEO Mark Hurd to continue to compete with International Business Machines (IBM) in the tech services business.

India Plays Catch-Up in Africa

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Indian companies are finding that Africa provides great growth and investment opportunities.

In India, Death to Global Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although the Indian economy is doing well and attracting significant foreign investment, most foreign investors, as well as many locals, may not be aware of the threat posed by the Naxalites.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Renault-Nissan CEO is fighting to keep pace in the U.S. and chasing Chinese and Indian customers.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) makes most of its money in the U.S., while IBM does the bulk of its business abroad.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Information technology services companies have typically relied on the U.S. market for a majority of their revenues. However, last quarter India-based Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) reported 51% of its revenues from North America, while only 35% of Armonk (N.Y.)-based IBM's revenues were domestic.

IBM vs. Tata: Which is More American?

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

India-based Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) makes most of its money in the U.S. while IBM does the bulk of its business abroad. This juxtaposition helps to explain investor reaction to the companies

China's Factory Blues

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

A combination of factors have made China the world's factory floor, but recent changes are forcing a restructuring of Chinese industry.

Guess Who's Getting the Most Work Visas

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Surprise! Indian outsourcers top the list of companies bringing foreign workers to the U.S. on the H-1B program.

Tata: Master of the Gentle Approach

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's Tata has made $18 billion worth of overseas acquisitions since 2000, but most acquired firms continue to operate autonomously with little interference from headquarters.

What's Roiling India's Stock Market? Bonds

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's debt and equity markets are hobbled by regulations that are intended to serve and protect small investors.

Just Don't Call It 'Chindia'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China and India are both currently booming. Foreign executives have found, however, that the formula for success in one probably will not apply to the other.

Exporting America's Travails

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What role will the global economy play on a U.S. downturn?

Exporting America's Travails

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In recent decades, when the U.S. sneezed, the rest of the world caught a cold. Has the influence of the U.S. economy on the rest of the world decreased in recent years?

Managing the Global Workforce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Multinational companies face many human resource management challenges as they seek to match talent from all over the world with client needs.

International Isn't Just IBM's First Name

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

IBM has had to undergo a monumental shift in its operational philosophy. In the past three years, IBM has hired more than 90,000 people in fast-developing countries like Brazil, China, and India.

The Dirty Dilemma of Canadian Crude

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Is the security of using Canadian crude oil worth its environmental costs?

My Other Car Is a Tata

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Tata Motors plans to introduce a low-cost car to India that could establish it as a major player in emerging markets. It is a challenge that Western automakers will find tough to meet and hard to ignore.

An Industry That's Fraying Fast

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The rising value of the Indian rupee is causing financial difficulties for some Indian textile firms, and causing others to find cheaper locations outside India for production. And although India may be a growing information systems powerhouse with 2 million tech employees around Bangalore, the textile and apparel industry employs 88 million.

This Race May Be Tata's to Lose

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Tata Motors, an Indian automobile manufacturer, is making an active bid for the Jaguar Cars and Land Rover brands from Ford Motor Company.

The Coming Commodity Clash

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Will commodities continue to be in short supply?

The Coming Commodity Clash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As industrial growth and infrastructure development continue to be strong in India and China, these countries' demand for basic commodities grows.

The Employee Is Always Right

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

It's Employees first, customers second, at India's large outsourcer, HCL Technologies.

Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra?

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In the BusinessWeek article Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra? (November 5, 2007) outlines the plan of a little-known Indian automobile manufacturer, Mahindra & Mahindra, to introduce two pickup trucks and one sport-utility vehicle (SUV) in the highly-competitive U.S. automobile market.

Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mahindra & Mahindra (Mahindra), an Indian conglomerate with more than $4.5 billion in sales, has been making automobiles for more than 50 years. According to the BusinessWeek article Baseball, Apple Pie...and Mahindra? (November 5, 2007), it plans to introduce a line of trucks and SUVs in the U.S. in 2009.


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