Regions

How to Make a €367 Million Loss Disappear

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Deutsche Bank structured a transaction with Italy’s Monte dei Paschi bank that allegedly helped to disguise trading losses during the 2008 financial crisis. Basically, the deal was structured for Paschi to have a certain immediate gain followed by a certain delayed gain for Deutsche Bank that was spread out over multiple years.

A Continent Divided

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

In the coming 12 months, four of Europe’s five largest economies have major referendums or elections. During these European elections, anti-immigrant parties are likely to score substantial gains and further weaken the European political establishment.

Populist Politicians Take On Italy’s Massive Debt Pile

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Italian courts are grappling with hundreds of lawsuits over unpaid debts going back fifty years. Unpaid bills and a massive debt have stoked voter frustration over the country’s old guard and led to the rise of the Five Star Party as a major rival to Italy’s Democratic Party.

Memo From Netflix: 'Ich Bin ein Berliner'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to attract European customers, an increasing number of content distribution companies like Netflix and Amazon are developing exclusive programs and series. Whereas the exclusive programming that Amazon and Netflix have developed in the U.S. to attract customers has some level of international appeal, in order to gain market share in European countries these firms are investing in original content tailored to each country's language and culture.

Google Isn’t Paying the ‘Google Tax’

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Google somehow pays an effective tax rate of about 7 percent on its non-U.S. income. How does it (and other internet companies) keep this rate so low?

A Pressing Matter: The Olive Oil Trade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The olive oil industry is based around the Mediterranean Sea. Tunisia, Spain, and Italy are the world's largest producers. While the United States is far behind in terms of production volume, California producers are taking a much more scientific approach to growing, harvesting, and processing olives.

Greece Gets Something Right!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Greece trails Spain and Italy in olive oil production, but is poised for a good year in 2015. A drought in Spain has led to a large drop in production, and bad weather, fruit flies, and a disease have all contributed to a decrease in Italian output.

Italy Leans While Greece Tumbles

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Viewed from afar, the financial woes of Italy and Greece can look dangerously similar. However, Italy has managed to avoid Greece's fate due to a stronger economy and more help from the European Central Bank.

Fiat Positions Maserati to Replace Ferrari

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne is shifting gears in terms of the firm's strategy. Out is Ferrari and in is Maserati, which Marchionne envisions as the linchpin of his $52 billion plan to turn Maserati, Alfa Romeo, and Jeep into global brands and boost net income fivefold.

McDonald’s Revamp Has Missing Ingredients

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has McDonald’s decided to respond to a decline in share price?

Starbucks: Howard Schultz on the Coffee Chain's Expansion Under His Leadership

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Howard Schultz had to create a coffee culture in the United States in order for his company to thrive.

Marchionne’s Last Lap

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Fiat CEO Marchionne says his expanded company will boost sales 60 percent by 2018. Analysts are doubtful.

Marchionne's Last Lap

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Fiat tries to reconfigure its product lineup to find the right niches in markets worldwide.

This "Baby" Jeep Has An Italian Accent

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The new Jeep Renegade represents the potential of the merged Fiat and Chrysler to efficiently launch a global product.

This "Baby" Jeep has An Italian Accent

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A new Jeep, the Renegade, will be built on a Fiat frame in an Italian factory but with Jeep styling.

Thank You For Vaping

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Scented vapors with my nicotine, please.

A Factory Owner Flees. So Does His Factory

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Between 2001 and 2011, about 27,000 companies left Italy, where high costs and regulatory rigidity have decreased competitiveness.

How the Robots Lost

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Why is it getting harder to make money in high-frequency trading? Those robots are just too good.

Ferrari Bets That Less is More

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Ferrari plans to reduce production in 2013 in an effort to grow sales.

The Euro Zone Loses Its Raison D’Etre

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Foreign ownership of debt in euro-area countries is dropping.

Lured From Retirement To Save Fiat

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Lorenzo Ramaciotti has a challenge in balancing consistency across brands with creating unique identities for Fiat's wide range of vehicles worldwide.

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

Doing Business With the Frenemy

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S. military has sourced $400 million worth of helicopters from an unlikely source: the same Russian military contractor that is arming the Syrian government.

Sanofi's Shock Therapy Enrages the French

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

France's Sanofi is closing R&D facilities in France and shifting research to America amid worker protests.

Europe's Latest Hardliners: German Automakers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While French and Italian automakers are feeling the pain of Europe's economic slowdown (and want financial assistance), German automakers that have long emphasized export markets in North America and Asia don't believe they should be asked to help in a bailout.

A Date With Dr. Nein

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can austerity work in restoring Europe's economy?

To Europe's Thrifty, Austerity Is Just Unfair

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Better-off European economies are being asked to pay for profligate economies' recovery. What might this mean for enterprise operations on the Old Continent?

Grounds Zero

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Why hasn't Starbucks tried to enter the market that inspired its development?

Righting the Ship of Fools: Making the Dismal Science More Transparent

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Enforcement of maritime safety laws may be lax; do the lessons extend to operations ashore?

Philly Cream Cheese's Spreading Appeal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Kraft Foods has revived its Philadelphia cream cheese brand, boosting international sales and adding flavors.

The Italian Jobs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

An influx of Chinese immigrants is transforming Italy's economy and sparking cultural backlash.

The Forgiveness Fix

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Should countries be allowed to erase or default on their debt?

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

The Long Shadow of Credit Default Swaps

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Sellers of credit swaps are on the hook if a nation defaults. Regulators have reined in risk, but have they gone far enough? Are weak or fragmented clearinghouses making matters worse?

How to Save Greece

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will it take to save Greece?

Electrolux Wants to Rule the Appliance World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Electrolux is closing some plants in high-cost locales like Canada - and opening new ones in Asia - as it prepares to challenge Whirlpool for global market position.

Benetton: A Must-Have Becomes a Has-Been

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the battle for inexpensive and trendy clothing, Italy's Benetton is losing global market share to Spain's Inditex and Sweden's H&M.

One Publisher Applauds as Its Print Ads Wither

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While many publishers bemoan the loss of print ads, Norway's Schibsted has developed a more-profitable global business in online classifieds.

The Economics of Alternative Energy

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Electricity generated from fossil fuels is starting to lose its price edge over some renewable energy sources. When will it be time for energy producers and consumers to jump on board?

In Defense of Goldman. Really

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Loopholes in EU rules, not Goldman Sachs, are to blame for Europe's debt troubles

Europe's New McCafe Culture

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Low-cost expansion is helping McDonald's vie with Starbucks as the continent's No. 1 coffee chain.

Free Papers, Costly Competition

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

These are difficult times in the free (advertising-based) newspaper industry. The industry leader has been Metro International, which has expanded to more than 70 cities worldwide but lost $32.7 million on sales of $314 million in the first nine months of 2007.


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