Regions

Selling China on Cheese

Bob Cohen, MBA  | 

The prospect of a $7.5-billion-a-year dairy market in China has created a quiet culinary revolution in its food-service industry. But selling directly to the restaurant industry is a lower value business than selling branded dairy products to consumers via supermarkets and retail stores. Fonterra, the world's biggest dairy exporter, is hoping to change that.

Changes On Tap for Japan's Beer Tax

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The proposed uniform tax rate across beer classes in Japan is intended to simplify the labeling of beers and promote beer exports. Craft beers in Japan, which make up a slim share of the market, may see increased popularity in their beer recipes as a result of tax revisions. Kanpai (Cheers)!

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Japan’s Big Bet

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Gambling is big business in Japan, and the casino gaming industry is about to see how big legalized gambling can be. Recent legislation will permit casinos to operate in the country. The potential size could be on a scale that dwarfs Las Vegas or even approaches the revenues of Macau.

Unexpected Election Outcome Begets Unexpected Winners and Losers

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Investors didn’t do what they were expected to do after American voters didn’t do what they were expected to do. Stocks posted their best week in five years, gold and Treasuries fell, and the dollar soared. Emerging-market securities and tax-free municipal bonds are among the few assets that plunged in value as predicted.

The Prenup That Didn't Stick

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

NTT Docomo is trying to exercise a clause in its joint venture agreement with Tata Group that would allow NTT Docomo to exit the joint venture with at least half of its original investment. It has even received a court ruling in support of this, and Tata has agreed to make the payment. India’s central bank, however, has blocked the payment, leaving the joint venture and both parties in legal limbo.

The Battle for Whistlepig Rye Whiskey

Bob Cohen, MBA  | 

Raj Bhakta turned Whistlepig into a premier rye whiskey by selling it as a small-batch American pastoral. Now he wants to make good on the marketing in Vermont. But his partners want him out.

Asia Is a Growth Market For Military Aircraft

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign sales are becoming increasingly important to U.S.-based defense contractors. Many Asian countries are ramping up their defense spending, while U.S. defense spending on new systems remains relatively flat. As part of a proposal to win sales in India, Lockheed-Martin and Boeing have both indicated that they will manufacture fighter jets in India rather than simply exporting them from the U.S.

Japanese Retailers Move into Vietnam

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Vietnam is attracting a number of foreign retailers as its economy expands, and the middle class develops. About 60 percent of the population is under thirty-five years old, suggesting even stronger future growth. Japanese retailers are staking out major positions in the Vietnamese market, while the domestic Japanese market remains mature.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Patent Police

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Asia is getting its own patent police. Government-backed firms seek fees in the United States and elsewhere. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tech companies are starting to use their patent stores more aggressively against rivals.

Japanese Choose the Mattress Over Banks

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Discounted cash flow and present value considerations are hallmark topics in every business curriculum, but how do related considerations apply in a negative interest rate environment?

Le Cost Killer

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Carlos Ghosn has an earned reputation for making unprofitable automobile manufacturers profitable. As Mitsubishi attempts to recover from its fuel economy scandal, his leadership will be crucial to making the Japanese automobile manufacturer successful again.

German Engineering for Chinese Wannabes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Germany's Borgward auto company was founded in 1924 and at one point was responsible for 60 percent of the country's auto exports. By 1961, however, it had gone out of business. Now the brand is being revived in China, with a Borgward SUV being manufactured by Chinese truck-maker, Beiqi Foton.

Samsung and LG Have A Battery Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Samsung and LG have been successful selling NCM batteries (nickel, cobalt, and manganese) for electric vehicles in China, with much of that success related to generous subsidies the Chinese government has provided to electric buses. A goal in stimulating the use of electric buses is to decrease pollution in China's cities. The government will continue providing subsidies, but only to the less expensive LFP batteries (lithium-iron-phosphate), which are available from a number of Chinese suppliers.

Sprint's Plan to Mortgage Its Airwaves

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Sprint is facing $34 billion in debt. They plan to borrow from a subsidiary that they will create.

Bond Trader's Dilemma

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Deepening concern over the global economy has made sub-zero interest rates the norm in most European Union countries as well as Japan. The willingness of debt investors to effectively pay governments to borrow reflects increasing skepticism of central bank policies and concern that those policies may ultimately do more harm than good to the global economy.

Samsung’s Emerging Market Is . . . Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While Samsung holds around 20 percent worldwide market share in smartphones, it has just 6 percent of the smartphone market in Japan. As it expanded worldwide, Samsung chose to focus on other emerging markets and largely left the Japanese market to local competitors. In fact, other than Apple, foreign phone makers have had difficulty entering the Japanese market.

The Iran Invasion

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The multinational agreement regarding Iran's nuclear program has opened the door for many foreign firms to pursue business deals in Iran. Not only are many foreign business leaders visiting Iran, but on a recent trip to Europe, the country's president, Hassan Rouhani, closed deals with several European firms. Most American firms, however, still have significant restrictions on what they can do in Iran.

Your Uber Driver Has a House to Show You

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Real estate agents turn to Uber-driving amid prolonged property slump. Cars for hire increased 51 percent in the first half of 2015.

An Unhappy New Year For Asia's Shipyards

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Asian shipbuilders have experienced canceled orders and a significant slowdown in new orders due to falling oil prices and slower growth in commodity demand from China.

Winning Nobels and Delighting Investors

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

For shareholders of Hamamatsu Photonics KK, there are plenty of reasons to celebrate. Apart from helping to advance our understanding of the universe, the company’s sensors play important roles in everything from X-ray machines to DNA sequencers. Hamamatsu has a 90 percent global market share in the devices known as photomultipliers and a stock price that’s jumped more than four-fold since early 2009.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Telecom giant SoftBank is building a massive investment arm that could spread as much as $3 billion among only 5 to 10 late-stage startups each year. This strategy differs from most other venture capital investors by concentrating risk in a few large investments without limited partners in an attempt to find the next Google.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Nikesh Arora is putting SoftBank on a path to invest billions in startups over the next few years. He has also shown his confidence in this plan by investing hundreds of millions of dollars of his own money in SoftBank.

SoftBank's $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Masayoshi Son, Chief Executive Officer of SoftBank, hired Nikesh Arora from Google to help the company invest $3 billion per year in promising startups with high end potential. Unlike most pools like this, they are not using a shotgun approach with the money, rather they are going to focus huge amounts of cash on around 10 startups. This Bloomberg Businessweek article gives personal insight into Arora and his frame of mind as well as his philosophies on risk.

SoftBank’s $3 Billion Startup Incubator

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

SoftBank President Nikesh Arora plans to invest hundreds of millions of dollars a year in no more than 10 startups. After getting most of its profits from a relatively steady telecommunications business in Japan, the change at SoftBank has been dramatic, even for a company with a history of seismic strategic shifts.

The Robots Chasing Amazon

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Robot makers are readying warehouse models that they say will rent for as little as $1.40 an hour. The cost of greater automation, of course, is fewer jobs. The roboticists are pitching the machines as a way to speed up packing without having to hire extra workers.

Was Tom Hayes in Charge of a $350 Trillion Conspiracy? Or Just Taking the Fall for One?

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

When UBS derivatives trader Tom Hayes saw that Lehman Brothers was collapsing on September 15, 2008, he knew he would take a huge loss unless he found a way to unwind the positions or the Libor for the yen did not spike. Two years earlier, he had found a way to rig it by paying off the brokers who advised the Libor banks on the daily movement of interest rates. Over the next three days, Hayes personally tilted one of the central pillars of the planet’s financial infrastructure to his own advantage. Now he's serving a fourteen-year prison sentence.

In Japan, Mobile Money is an Also-Ran

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With all its interest in tech gadgets and automation, it's easy to think Japan would be on the forefront of mobile phone and Internet-based banking—but it isn't. In fact, Japan has one of the lower rates of mobile banking adoption in the world behind India and Nigeria. Japanese customers have a preference for cash, and visiting luxurious bank branches to access their cash.

Those Inflation Targets Keep Getting Harder to Hit

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Central banks have promised higher inflation is on its way. They say they can raise inflation to reach their targets, but interest rates at about zero won’t be any help.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

'OK, Ready for Work Again!!!'

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Shigenobu Nagamori started Nidec in 1973, and turned his small motor-making business into one of Japan’s most profitable multinational corporations. Nagamori, who has been recognized as one of Japan’s top business leaders, has an uncommon leadership style: He emphasizes motivation, dedication, and hard work over talent and intelligence.

Wal-Mart Has Found a New Discount: Its Taxes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has Wal-Mart reduced its tax burden in recent years?

LG's Slim Screens Get Slimmer

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Is thinner better even if it's more expensive?

Takata Could Use an Air Bag of Its Own

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Takata expanded its recall of defective air bags to 34 million vehicles. Analysts say that could cost it $2.5 billion.

State-Owned Areva is Leaking Cash

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

France's attempt to make money selling nuclear power plants has fallen flat.

Japan's Amazon Has Bigger Dreams

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Japan’s dominant e-commerce company, Rakuten, is trying to become a global competitor through acquisitions.

Japan's Amazon has Bigger Dreams

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Having gained a strong position in Japan, Rakuten is making acquisitions internationally to spur growth.

Abe’s Rust Belt Problem

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Reforms have helped exports but aren’t bringing jobs home.

High-Speed Trading Comes to Japan

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Automated high-frequency trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange has forced most human traders out of their jobs.

Paying for the Privelege of Lending Japan Money

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bond prices have risen so high that yields on much of the world's government debt have turned negative.

The World's Biggest Car Company Wants to Get Rid of Gasoline

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Will electric vehicles become a thing of the past? Toyota has a vision that its hydrogen vehicle will become the first mass-market hydrogen car.

For Japan, Steady Growth Proves Elusive

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

With Japan in recession once again, the flaws in Prime Minister Abe’s economic plans have become obvious.

Japan Feels the Heat On Bribery

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Under pressure from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Japan has begun to enforce its laws against bribery and corruption overseas.

Salmon Farmers Hail the "Supercycle"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Worldwide demand for salmon is growing faster than it can be produced in Chile, Norway, Canada, and the United States.

Green Buzz

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Does coffee have a new competitor?

Power Loss in Japan

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Three years after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that caused radiation leaks from the Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex, the economic impact continues. As of September 2013, Japan is without nuclear power.

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What regulatory environment do foreign corporations face in China, and how might this affect their future profitability?

Foreign Companies Cry Foul at Chinese Probes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Direct investment in China is down, as foreign companies face increased scrutiny from the Chinese government.

Japan's Shame Index Tries to Spur Profits

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can a stock index shame companies into focusing on creating value for shareholders?

Made in Memphis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising transportation costs and wage rates in China are causing firms to relocate manufacturing to the Southeast U.S.

The Chinese TV Maker Taking Aim at Sony

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hisense is moving up in worldwide market share of television sets and is challenging Sony for the #3 position.

Big Enough to Drive a Government Contract Through

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Companies that move offshore to avoid U.S. taxes still get contracts with the government.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The next car an American purchases—even if it has a German or Japanese brand name—might just be made in Mexico.

The 23-Year-Olds Will Save America

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Younger millennials have the numbers on their side.

"I Guess I Was Just Mad"

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Part-time employees in Japan have filed wage discrimination lawsuits and formed unions in response to their treatment by employers.

Welcome to Thailand, Land of Coups

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Governmental instability in Thailand is dampening foreign investment and economic growth.

Modesty is the New Abercrombie

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Abercrombie is hoping to bring back teens who’ve left the mall and are shopping with their smartphones.

Japan's Foreign Car Boom Could Crater

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The rally in Japanese equities has fueled sales of foreign autos.

Nissan Moves to the Back of the Pack

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

In two years, Nissan has gone from having the highest to lowest profit margins of any Japanese automaker.

Nissan Moves to the Back of the Pack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A weakening yen is good news for most Japanese automakers, but less so for Nissan.

Land of the Falling Wage

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe is pushing companies to raise wages in an attempt to finally rid Japan of its deflation.

Japan Tries to Alter the Market's DNA

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Compared with their U.S. and European counterparts, Japanese CEOs are less focused on shareholder returns. The country's prime minister Shinzō Abe's new JPX-Nikkei Index 400 is an attempt to boost growth by spotlighting companies that focus more on financial performance.

Japan Looks to Sake To Spur Exports

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Seeking to spur exports, Japanese sake producers are starting to treat sake and the selection of rice with an approach similar to fine wineries.

Apple's Asia Breakthrough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Apple is poised for growth in Japan and China.

Thank You For Vaping

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Scented vapors with my nicotine, please.

What’s Roiling the Waters Of Global Trade

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Emerging market demand has slowed as China’s economy cools.

Japan's Billionaire Brawl

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Will a price war help Yahoo Japan take the lead in Japan’s e-commerce business, or will it just hurt market leader Rakuten and help Amazon?

Smut With A Smile

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Promoting the mantra “Keep Calm and Chive On,” TheChive.com is a tacky little frat-boy-like site –- with an annual revenue stream approaching $100 million.

Yawning Through the Apocalypse

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Do investors have "calamity fatigue?" Wall Street’s fear index and other measures of anxiety show traders are giving the risk of a U.S. default a big yawn.

Leases Aren’t Just for Luxury Anymore

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

In which direction is the U.S. automobile leasing market going?

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

U.S. energy companies want to export natural gas, but U.S. chemical companies that favor cheap domestic prices want to block exports.

What's Good for Toyota Isn't Always Good for Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's economic plan to spur the economy and investment may not be all that attractive to large Japanese multinational firms.

What’s Good for Toyota Isn’t Always Good for Japan

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Yen depreciation helps big exporters but won’t do much for the little guy.

Charlie Ergen is Coming Down to Earth

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Will picking up Sprint give Dish’s Charlie Ergen the hand he needs to compete with AT&T and Verizon?

The Big Three Are Back, Right?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The Detroit Three have recovered and are more competitive than ever. But can they keep pace with increasingly stronger rivals?

Toyota’s Awesome Yen Advantage

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Just one year after toppling GM to become the world's No. 1 carmaker, Toyota is poised to report profits at a five-year high of 860 billion yen.

Toyota's Awesome Yen Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The yen falling 16 percent in the last five months translates to about an additional $1,500 cost advantage per each car made in Japan.

Toyota's Awesome Yen Advantage

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Toyota, which imports almost 30 percent of the vehicles it sells in the U.S., may yield an extra $1,500 in operating profit per car.

At Japan's Carmakers, Men Lead, Women Follow

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Female managers are a rarity in Japanese car companies, but successes at Nissan might change things.

Battered in China, Japan Inc. Seeks Refuge

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japanese auto companies are finding Thailand more friendly than China.

Fingers Crossed In the Alps

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Davos attendees hope signs of a recovery don’t vanish in the mist.

The Surprising Upside to Currency Wars

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Japan is currently trying to devalue its currency. Is this appropriate for Japan, and what might other countries do in response?

The Surprising Upside To Currency Wars

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Japan wants to create inflation, which will weaken the yen. The whole world may benefit.

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

Japan’s Central Bank Is Under Siege

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The Bank of Japan may lose its independence if it doesn’t crank up the money supply.

Charlie Rose Talks to Kenneth Rogoff

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Kenneth Rogoff has found that debt levels of 90-100% of GDP for a country will slow the country’s future GDP growth. Does he think the United States is going the way of Greece or Japan?

Japan’s Fear of Risk Is Getting Dangerous

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The Japanese are the most cautious people on the planet, surveys show. The trait is affecting the stock market and retirement savings.

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China is adding lots of robots to its manufacturing production lines. That's good for its competitiveness and productivity, not so good for the displaced workers.

Japan's Pain is Wal-Mart's Gain

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Many global discount retailers have tried to establish a presence in Japan. After a dismal past in the country, Wal-Mart now believes there is hope for its "every day low prices" slogan there.

Japan's Pain is Wal-Mart's Gain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With incomes falling, Japanese consumers like Wal-Mart's low prices.

Sharp’s Profits on LCD Panels: Worse Than Flat

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Sharp forecasted a record loss on November 1, 2012, twice the previous estimate, raising questions about its ability to survive. Sharp once dominated the LCD television industry with a 22 percent market share.

Like Malbec For Porsches

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In an effort to manage the country's economy and exchange rates, Argentina's government has enacted new regulations that limit a company's ability to import parts or finished goods. In order to help get imports approved, companies now are trying to find Argentinian goods that can be exported.

Sharp’s Profits on LCD Panels: Worse Than Flat

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Sharp forecasted a record loss on November 1, 2012, twice the previous estimate, raising questions about its ability to survive. Sharp once dominated the LCD television industry with a 22 percent market share.

Masayoshi Son's Big Foreign Adventure

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A slow growth and aging market in Japan leads SoftBank to look internationally for investment opportunities.

Asia's Growing Thirst For Gut-Cleaning Drinks

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Saying that a yogurt product helps create intestinal flora or has health benefits helps drive growth in Asia.

Japan's Hottest New Export Market: Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's automakers are now shipping cars made outside of Japan, back to Japan for sale.

Japan Wants Free Trade. Its Farmers Don't

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While rural farmers contribute a minuscule amount to Japan's GDP, their political power to block free trade is significant.

DoCoMo Savors An Older Vintage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With 23 percent of Japan's population over the age of 65, phone makers are developing handsets and software that are senior friendly.

DoCoMo Savors An Older Vintage

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

Will targeting older customers with tailored smartphones and software enable NTT DoCoMo to regain lost market share?

China Eyes Japan as the Land of Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese companies are looking to build their reputation, and their quality, by capturing market share in Japan.

Wendy's Goes Beyond the Dollar Menu in Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

To lure trendy diners in Japan, Wendy's has introduced a $16 burger topped with truffles and foie gras.

Liquefied Natural Gas: Target Asia

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

North American natural gas prices are half what they were in 2008. A boom in LNG exports could change that.

Tankers That Won't Kill You at the Gas Pump

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hurt by the strong yen, Japanese boatbuilders employ a marketing pitch that stresses fuel efficiency.

A Grim Future for Japan's Fisheries

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japan's fishing industry, once the most robust in the world, has been in decline for some time. The tsunami may have pushed it over the edge.

Japan's Rolling Blackouts Dim Prospects for Recovery

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA  |  Accounting & Taxation

New accounting issues in Japan: How do you measure and report the financial risk associated with an earthquake, the resulting losses, or the costs of a cleanup effort that may take several decades?

Economic Aftershocks

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How quickly will Japan and the world recover?

Rebuilding - Without the Graft

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How will Japan rebuild its economy?

Rebuilding – Without the Graft

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Despite efforts to rein in Japan's zenekon and their cronyism, these companies may determine how the country is rebuilt - and enjoy a windfall profit from doing it.

Don't Just Do Something, Stand There!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Given all of the factors that should be slowing the market - particularly the Japan earthquake - why is it doing so well? Is it time for investors to ignore the headlines and get back into equities?

Don't Just Do Something, Stand There!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Given all of the factors that should be slowing the market - particularly the Japan earthquake - why is it doing so well? Is it time for investors to ignore the headlines and get back into equities?

Don't Just Do Something, Stand There!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Given all of the factors that should be slowing the market - particularly the Japan earthquake - why is it doing so well? Is it time for investors to ignore the headlines and get back into equities?

The Cataclysm This Time

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How will Japan recover from the triple hit of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor problems?

Crisis in Japan: The Impact on American Companies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Nearly three dozen U.S. corporations derive at least 15 percent of their sales from the Japanese market.

Rise of the Machines (Again)

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

U.S. companies chase the fast-growing market for service bots. In part, they're trying to catch up with European and Asian companies.

Global Inflation Starts with Chinese Workers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rising wages in China will contribute to inflationary pressure on goods worldwide.

If Demography Is Destiny, Then India Has the Edge

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Research shows working-age populations are slipping in the U.S. and other industrialized nations while those of other countries are growing faster.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

Rare Earths from Japan's Junk Pile

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japan is recycling rare earth metals because China has cut the world supply.

The Partnership

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

The Partnership

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

The Partnership

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Bernanke and Geithner's battle with the Republicans and the Tea Party over quantitative easing could help determine the fate of the economy, Obama's presidency, and the Federal Reserve itself.

Cisco Shortfall Shows Wider Risks in Government Cuts

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cisco's challenges may signal broader risks for businesses that depend on government spending.

Fiat Tries Another Breakfast in America

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Is the Fiat 500 carrying overly optimistic U.S. expectations?

Fixing the Global Trade System by the Numbers

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Just how much pull President Obama has with Beijing may become clear when G-20 leaders meet in Seoul to consider a U.S. proposal to limit trade surpluses and deficits. It may not be enough.

A $14.5 Trillion Economy Stuck in Neutral

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What do we do to get the $14.5 trillion economy going again?

To Boost Buying Power, Wal-Mart Woos Partners

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The world's largest retailer is convinced it can cut even better deals by combining its purchasing with those of suppliers.

India's Bitter Choice: Water for Steel or Food?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

There is competition in India for water, required both by local farmers and by foreign developers of steel mills.

Africa Looks Like a Dealmaker's Paradise

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Some $15 billion in takeovers have been announced in July, with the latest being Wal-Mart's agreement to buy South African retailer Massmart.

The Squeeze on Global Rubber Supplies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Freakish weather hurts rubber production across Asia, giving a Japanese condom maker a headache

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's booming demand for iron ore is causing opportunities and problems in Australia.

The Deal Is Simple. Australia Gets Money, China Gets Australia.

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Exports to China have helped Australia escape the global recession. Nonetheless, many Australians are worried.

Japan Has More Than Just a Yen Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The root of Japan's highly valued yen lies in policy choices by the government.

The Zero Percent Solution

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What should the Federal Reserve do with interest rates?

Japan’s Mizuno Swings for the Fences

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

In pursuing industry leadership, how is Mizuno pulling out all the stops?

Japan's Mizuno Swings for the Fences

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's top baseball brand is aiming for the U.S. market

Looking East, Big Pharma Cuts Prices

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why are pharmaceutical companies cutting prices in Asia?

Looking East, Big Pharma Cuts Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Drugmakers are beginning to choose sales volume over high margins to tap the massive Asian market

The Case for More Stimulus

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Should the Fed give the economy more stimulus?

How Korea Fretted Its Way to success

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Years of worrying about being squeezed by China and Japan helped Seoul stand up to its rivals. Now, it's obsessed with finding the Next Big Thing.

Global Inflation Is Low—and Falling

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Why it is important not to let deflation take hold.

Alan Mulally's Asian Sales Call

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Making up for lost time, the Ford CEO is boosting production, as well as investment and marketing, in fast-growing China and India

A Tear in Japan's Safety Net

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Some Japanese retirees, out of respect for former employers and current employees, have agreed to cuts in guaranteed pension benefits. Will this change the corporate culture?

The Humbling of Toyota

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A combination of high-speed global growth and ambitious cost cuts led to the quality lapses that have tarnished the once-mighty brand

Brownnosing for Google Broadband

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

If American Internet service gets faster, people will likely spend more time online watching videos and playing games, providing Google fresh ways to expand its advertising business

Oh, What a (Hideous) Feeling

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Why Toyota may take years to win back the confidence of car buyers, assuming the flurry of recalls is over. Perhaps there's an opening for Honda, German, and Korean autos, or even Detroit iron.

Japan's Car Guys Cross the China Sea

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese automakers are hiring more Japanese engineers to boost efficiency and improve design.

From India, the Latest Management Fad

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Called jugaad, India's improvisational style of invention focuses on being fast and cheap, attributes that might be just right for these times.

Toyota Gets Stuck in a Pair of Ruts

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

With a strengthening yen eating into its profits, where is Toyota headed?

Toyota Gets Stuck in a Pair of Ruts

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

While a strengthening yen eats up profits, the carmaker's reputation for quality is taking a hit.

Abercrombie Bargains for a Rebound

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The clothing retailer hung tough on prices, and teens took a hike. Now can the paragon of preppy coolness woo them back?

China's End Run Around the U.S.

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will Beijing dominate the future in world trade?

The China Hype

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite an impressive rebound, an innovation shortfall may hobble sustainable growth.

Sony's Google Gambit

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

It is latching onto the search giant's open-source Android and other offerings as it plays catch-up with competitors.

America's Fickle Small-Car Market

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Nine new small cars are rolling out in the next 18 months, including six from GM and Ford. Will they sell in the U.S. without the incentives of high gas prices and federal subsidies?

Where the Action is in China

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the fastest-growing region in China?

How not to Sweat the Retail Details

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A Hong Kong-based sourcer is handling factory contracting for more and more U.S. brands that discover it can do the job better. But will political problems arise?

Philip Morris Unbound

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Freed from Altria, Philip Morris International CEO Louis Camilleri is pushing hard to boost global sales before U.S.-style tobacco restrictions spread.

A Hidden Drag on the Economy

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happens to temporary workers in a recession?

Inspiration From Emerging Economies

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The dominant logic holds that innovation comes from the U.S, goes to Europe and Japan, then gravitates to poor countries. But now we are starting to see a reversal of that flow.

What's Dragging Europe Down

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although Europe largely avoided the subprime loan mess, it's struggling to prop up some subprime companies and subprime countries.

Japan is Running out of Options

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan is impacted by the worldwide economic slowdown. Since its banks have largely avoided bad loans, its safe status is driving up currency and killing exports.

Japan is Running out of Options

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japan's economy has shrunk sharply in recent months. Policymakers have few options available to spur growth.

Global Sluggishness Will Slow a U.S. Recovery

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What has globalization done to economic recovery in the U.S.?

GM Hits a Wall in China, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese consumers, concerned about quality and GM's future, are finding GM less attractive than they have in the past.

State Capitalism

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will free enterprise survive the current recession?

What the U.S. Can Learn from Japan

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the U.S. avoid Japan's mistakes?

How the Strong Yen Has Weakened Japan

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The currency's climb is hurting exporters, and there's no domestic demand to take up the slack.

How the Strong Yen Has Weakened Japan

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japan's economy is contracting sharply because of a drop in exports. Reviving the economy will prove to be a challenge due to weak domestic demand.

Is Silicon Valley Losing its Magic?

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can Silicon Valley still deliver financing and innovation?

A Hundred Factories Too Many

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can carmakers scale down production and then ramp back up when demand starts to recover?

A Hundred Factories Too Many

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The current economic slowdown has brought into sharp relief the auto industry's huge global over capacity. Global capacity is 94 million vehicles while demand is only 60 million.

A Deflation Maelstrom in the Making

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will the Fed's actions pull the economy out of a recession?

Behind Caterpillar's Big Scoop in China

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Patience, persistence, and transfer of technology paved the way for Caterpillar to make a big acquisition in China.

The Fed Opens the Floodgates

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the Fed get the economy going?

Even Toyota's got the Blues

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Overexpansion and plunging sales in North America have brought losses and deep discounts to Toyota Motor Car Company.

The Changes Business Wants

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

The Changes Business Wants

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

The Changes Business Wants

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What does business want from the new Obama administration, and what is it likely to get? This group of articles digs deep into this question and provides many key insights to what the next four years might mean for businesses.

Taxes: Time to Forge a Compromise

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Business leaders say Obama's plan to end the tax deferment for overseas corporate profits will stymie growth.

With a Soaring Yen, Japan Is Buying

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With a weak local market and a strong currency, many Japanese firms are taking the opportunity to make overseas investments.

Sony Chases Apple's Magic

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Even with a former Steve Jobs lieutenant driving innovation, Sony still hasn't captured its rival's cool.

A Real Risk of Deflation

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is deflation bad for the economy?

A Real Risk of Deflation

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. economy has all the ingredients

What Detroit Likes About the Crises

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

When less is more in distribution strategy

A Strange Detour for Chrysler

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Why turning into a marketer and contract manufacturer of other companies' cars is risky

Why the Dollar May Be Ready for a Rebound

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

As outlooks for the euro zone and Britain dim, central bankers will likely be forced to lower interest rates, creating conditions that could restore some of the U.S. currency's value

Bulking up: Japan's drugmakers

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Japanese drugmakers are on an overseas acquisition binge to get bigger. For the first time, they pose a competitive threat to the big Western firms.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Why move auto producton to Japan when it is cheaper elsewhere?

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility and higher quality.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility.

What Could Dull Toyota's Edge

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In the aftermath of the Big Three's cost-saving deal with unions, Toyota's U.S. plants must play catch-up.

How New Global Banking Rules Could Deepen the U.S. Crisis

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Following a near-global financial crisis in 1999, representatives from 10 of the world's wealthiest nations drafted a set of improved banking regulations intended to stabilize international finance. Now that they are being implemented, they could do just the opposite.

How New Global Banking Rules Could Deepen the U.S. Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Following a near-global financial crisis in 1999, representatives from 10 of the world's wealthiest nations drafted a set of improved banking regulations intended to stabilize international finance. Now that they are being implemented, they could do just the opposite.

How New Global Banking Rules Could Deepen the U.S. Crisis

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Following a near-global financial crisis in 1999, representatives from 10 of the world's wealthiest nations drafted a set of improved banking regulations intended to stabilize international finance. Now that they are being implemented, they could do just the opposite.

Japan: Google's Real-Life Lab

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is Google learning from Japan?

Exporting America's Travails

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What role will the global economy play on a U.S. downturn?

A Long, Long Wait for a Wii

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Why can't anyone find a Nintendo Wii in stock?

China Inc. is Out on a Limb

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Capital is rushing into China, Chinese companies are going public, and many individuals and companies are trying to profit by investing in listed firms.


Feedback