Regions

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

Carmakers Could Hit That Wall, Too

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The North American automotive industry is highly integrated across Canada, the U.S., and Mexico, with parts and vehicles flowing back and forth across borders. All that could change if Donald Trump follows through on his threats to levy import taxes and cut trade with Canada and Mexico. The implications for automakers from Ford to Toyota to Volkswagen are significant, as are the resultant rise in prices of that U.S. consumers would face.

We Found Your Last Smartphone, Next to Your Old VCR

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although many communities, electronics manufacturers, and retailers have programs to recycle old electronic gear, a great deal of e-waste ends up in places such as the neighborhood of Renovacion in Mexico City. There devices are manually and mechanically taken apart to get at bits of precious metals that can be harvested, melted down, and resold. The work pays well, but there are potentially significant health risks to workers and residents.

A Gold Rush in Mexico's Deadly South

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Mexico's Guerrero state, signs of a gold rush are emerging.

A Saudi About-Face

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has initiated plans to lead OPEC in production cuts that are designed to reduce the oil glut and raise crude oil prices globally. Production increases in non-OPEC countries and Saudi Arabia itself contributed to production that drove down prices. Now, the oil ministry is changing direction in order to steer prices higher and reduce the damaging economic impact on its own economy.

Hot New (Mexican!) Drink Alert! Mezcal

Bob Cohen, MBA  | 

The consumer market continues to focus on millennials. Spirits makers get the point.

Como se dice 'Uber'?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After ceding China, Uber, the ride-hailing giant, plans to double its presence in Latin America by the end of 2017. As long as Uber’s competitors there try to make money on each ride, the region will remain far more affordable for Uber than India or China.

Is the U.S. Missing the TPP Train?

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership has competition from the Chinese-led Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Both agreements have their boosters and detractors. The conflict illustrates how economics and politics are globally intertwined and are on the political front burner this election year.

Sweet Cakes with a Bitter Aftertaste

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

An Oregon couple is appealing a $135,000 fine for refusing to bake a cake for a same-sex couple. They argue that baking the cake would force them to engage in speech they disagree with.

Digital Payoffs for Volunteer EMTs

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

A Google-backed startup is building a volunteer network in the Dominican Republic and Tanzania. It is bringing 911 service to the developing world with smartphones and motorcycles.

Digital Payoffs for Volunteer EMTs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Trek Medics is training volunteer medical technicians and providing free phone plans to bring rural emergency services to countries where such offerings are rare. Trek has been able to build a volunteer network of about 200 people with a shoestring budget.

The U.S. Is a Big Oil Importer Again

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Oil production from wells in the U.S. has increased to the point that it can be exported, but heavy crude oil from foreign sources is still being imported. Refineries are finding it to be very profitable to import foreign crude and store it for later use instead of buying directly from U.S. sources and processing domestic oil.

Keeping (Legal) Dollars Moving in Mexico

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

Dollar transfers from one Mexican business flows through U.S. banks before being received by another Mexican business. These money transfers typically are costly to the legitimate businesses which use them. A new transfer program created by the Mexican central bank seeks to streamline the process.

The IPO Aimed At Iran

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why would Saudi Arabia consider an IPO at this time of historically low oil prices? Saudi Arabia is considering a new strategic ally in its cold war against Iran: The world’s 330 million owners of publicly traded stock.

Not So Bad After All

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

BP has paid billions of dollars for the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, but environmental damage has been far less than many feared.

The Secret Sauce

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How Buffalo Wild Wings turned the sports bar into a $1.5 billion juggernaut.

The Secret Sauce

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

With $1.5 billion in annual revenue, Buffalo Wild Wings is breaking records in the casual-dining category.

On Payday Loans, Churches Ask, "WWJD?"

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

Alabama churches are lobbying for tighter regulation of local payday lenders.

Outsourcing: Loss of U.S. Manufacturing Jobs Picked Up Speed

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcing has been taking place for longer than most U.S. college students have been alive.

Made in Memphis

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How have tax incentives and labor costs affected the location of new manufacturing plants in the South?

Big Enough to Drive a Government Contract Through

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Companies that move offshore to avoid U.S. taxes still get contracts with the government.

Another World Cup Surprise: TV Ratings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

After tremendous doubt about Brazil’s ability to make it happen, the World Cup wins. The match between the U.S. and Portugal on ESPN drew 18.2 million viewers, a record for soccer. Brave World Cup sponsors could not be happier.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The next car an American purchases—even if it has a German or Japanese brand name—might just be made in Mexico.

Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

Thanks to low labor costs and a booming U.S. market, it appears that Mexico will soon produce more cars than Brazil.

Why Mexico is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

With labor costs just 20 percent of those in the United States, Mexico could pass Brazil to become the No. 7 auto producer.

Droid Killer?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Cheap smartphones running Firefox’s mobile OS are beginning to spread into emerging markets.

Droid Killer?

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Will Firefox be the new OS for our smartphones?

Mexico’s Narcos Scare Oil and Gas Investors

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

New laws will let in foreign drillers, but gangs may deter small players.

Who Cares About Keystone XL?

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Delays on the KXL force pipeline companies to find alternatives.

The LIfe and Times of a Sirlion Steak

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Meatpackers are suing to block a federal rule requiring Country of Origin Labeling on beef sold in the U.S.

Nissan Moves to the Back of the Pack

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

In two years, Nissan has gone from having the highest to lowest profit margins of any Japanese automaker.

Blockbuster Is Still a Hit - South of the Border

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Having brick-and-mortar stores that rent video games and movies is still a viable business model in Mexico.

Mexico's Surprising Engineering Strength

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The big draw for foreign investment in Mexico is no longer just availability of assembly line workers. Skilled engineers are one reason carmakers have invested nearly $13 billion in Mexico in the last three years.

Wal-Mart’s New Chief Faces Old Woes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

What is the outlook for Wal-Mart now that Doug McMillon has taken over?

Mexico’s Surprising Engineering Strength

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The country’s auto industry gets a boost from homegrown talent.

A Keystone Pipeline That's Ready to Roll

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

TransCanada plans to increase the amount of oil the Keystone Gulf Coast will carry to 830,000 barrels a day.

Mexico's President Courts Big Oil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In order to extract hard-to-get oil reserves, Mexico needs the expertise of foreign oil companies.

Spillapalooza: How BP Got Screwed in the Gulf

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

BP is challenging a claims administrator’s interpretation of a multi-billion dollar settlement the company made over the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Spillapalooza: How BP Got Screwed in the Gulf

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

BP is paying billions of dollars for economic damages related to its 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, but many of these claims may be inflated and/or fictitious.

The Perils of Price-Matching

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Walmart’s nationally advertised price-matching promotion shows how a popular retail strategy can create a consumer backlash.

Frackonomics Rattles The Global Oil Industry

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

U.S. production of light, sweet crude is increasing dramatically because of fracking. However, imports of heavy crude from Canada are likely to remain high because of capital investments by large U.S. refineries to enable processing of heavier crude oil. The good news is that the increase in light, sweet supply is sure to drive world prices down.

Mapping the Way to a Global Free-Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The more nations involved in trade-liberalizing negotiations, the harder it is to get things accomplished.

Wal-Mart: A Pricey Corruption Inquiry Ahead

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Did Wal-Mart's managers in Mexico pay bribes in order to facilitate a rapid expansion?

The Drug War in Mexico, Now on the Blogosphere

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

With the press cowed by gang reprisals, blog posts and tweets fill an information void.

Carlos Slim Skirts a Ban on TV Broadcasts

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The world's richest man is using digital distribution to escape regulation, sparking the ire of Mexican TV broadcasters.

A Spanish Starbucks For Sandwiches

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Spain's 100 Montaditos intends to open 4,000 stores in the USA at a pace far faster than Starbucks' early growth. Analysts are skeptical.

Yankee Chicken Go Home!

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would you move an oversupply of dark meat?

Nafta's Rolling Thunder

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A welcome end to the U.S.-Mexico trucking dispute - how can operations managers take advantage of it?

Procter & Gamble Needs to Shave More Indians

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Procter & Gamble's new CEO plans to increase revenue by expanding sales of existing products rather than through acquisitions.

A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Higher wages in China and smarter factories in the U.S. may boost American manufacturing - if U.S. unions and big government don't get in the way.

A CEO's Dilemma: When Is It Safe to Hire Again?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

CEOs don't want to increase employment until they know the recovery is real, but it won't be until they hire.

Climate Skeptics Storm the Capitol

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Cap and tax may be just the first casualty of the skeptics in the incoming U.S. House and Senate. How should operations managers react?

Fiat Tries Another Breakfast in America

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Is the Fiat 500 carrying overly optimistic U.S. expectations?

Fiat Tries Another Breakfast in America

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

After being out of the U.S. market for 27 years, Fiat is using its Chrysler connections to stage a comeback with a very small car.

Fiat Tries Another Breakfast in America

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Italian carmaker hopes its small 500 will propel its U.S. return.

Coke's Last Round

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The developed world can't drink any more Coke, and India and China are saturated with competitors. That leaves Africa as the last great growth opportunity for Coke.

Those Amber Waves Are Fueling Exports

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a weak dollar and poor growing conditions in Europe, U.S. farm exports are strong this year.

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

The United States of Tariffs

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The U.S. has used tariffs for more than two centuries to raise revenue and protect American industry. Will this work again in an era of diminished American power?

The Ultimate Driving Machine

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

BMW has seen the future and it is global warming, urbanization and electric cars. They are acting on that future today

The Wailing Wall

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

How do we fix the labor market in the U.S.?

Sony and Samsung's Strategic Split

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While Sony bets on outsourcing TVs, Samsung is building an edge by making its own.

Hard Times Ease for a Cement King

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Mexican cement giant Cemex survived a near default. But a return to double-digit growth could be years off.

The Oil Crisis Slamming Mexico

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sharply dropping Pemex revenues are causing a budget deficit in Mexico.

BP Keeps Rolling the Dice

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

BP continues its high-risk, high-reward strategy in its search for petroleum. It has recently paid off in the Gulf of Mexico.

BP Keeps Rolling the Dice

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

A vast discovery in the Gulf of Mexico is the latest sign of success in a high-risk, high-reward strategy.

Seeking the 'Next Billion' Gamers

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Startup Zeebo is betting the growing middle class in emerging markets will take to its affordable console.

China's Eroding Advantage

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What shifts are ahead in global economics?

China's Eroding Advantage

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A new study says rising wages in China and higher shipping costs make Mexico a better choice for manufacturing even before country political risk is considered.

China's Eroding Advantage

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Outsourcers are seeing the costs of manufacturing in China climb, making other countries more attractive.

Business Is Standing Its Ground

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Despite the drug violence, major global companies are hanging tough in Mexico.

Grassroots Industrial Policy

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The states are entering the private sector.

Bargain-Rate Buzz

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

OfficeMax is betting on low-cost marketing stunts to prompt a turnaround.

Capitalism with a Human Face

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

As charitable giving dries up, new kinds of leaders are taking on the world's problems, using the for-profit world as a model.

The War Over Offshore Wind Is Almost Over

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

It's no longer if, but when, where, and how many wind farms will go up along the U.S. coast.

A Slippery Moment for Mexican Oil

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Mexican oil production has plummeted in recent years and Pemex does not have the expertise to find and produce oil in the most promising new areas.

It's Become a World of Bright Lights and Big Cities

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

In 2007, for the first time, the human race became more urban than rural, according to the United Nations.

Refighting Nafta

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

The free-trade deal is taking the blame for huge job losses. But its true effects on workers and competitiveness are far more complicated.

On the Border: The 'Virtual Fence' Isn't Working

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Illegal immigration has emerged as a hot button issue in election year politics. None of the proposed solutions appears to be both effective and politically palatable.

Exporting America's Travails

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What role will the global economy play on a U.S. downturn?

Illegals and Business: A Glimpse of the Future?

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Are the days of tolerance in hiring illegal workers over for U.S. businesses?

The Ugly Side of Micro-Lending

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Banks and retailers are extending credit to Mexico's working poor, often at interest rates of 80% to 100%. Lenders have few disclosure requirements, and many borrowers do not understand the interest rates being charged.

The Ugly Side of Micro-Lending

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Micro-lenders in Mexico are earning exorbitant rates of interest, 50% to 120%, on small loans to fund family businesses. These rates compare to 31% on average for all countries and 22% to 29% in the U.S.

Hire an Illegal Worker, Lose Your Business

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

What will happen to businesses that hire illegal immigrants? In Arizona, bad things, according to a new law.


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