Regions

Cybersecurity: The Next Hack Will Turn Your Lights Off

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

The next big cyberattack could turn America's lights off. Security experts say there's evidence Russian hackers have breached U.S. utilities and nuclear power plants.

Liquefied Natural Gas: A Global LNG Shuffle Starts as Long-Term Contracts Expire

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Contracts between suppliers of natural gas and utilities typically run for up to 20 years, stabilizing prices and supplies. Twenty percent of contracts will expire from 2018 to 2020, with 80 percent expiring over the next decade, providing an opening for new suppliers to step in.

Cybersecurity: The Next Hack Will Turn Your Lights Off

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Hacking is reaching new levels. Russia, for example, is taking out lights.

Another Pipeline of Russian Influence

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

When campaigning through steel country, Donald Trump promised to bring back jobs to the American steel industry. He also indicated that "we're going to be make pipeline in the United States" with American steel. However, tariffs or trade restrictions on "cheap" foreign steel have not been forthcoming, and a big winner in some recent pipeline contracts is a Russian steel company with close family ties to the Trump family.

The World Is Crazy. The Market Is Cool With That

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Whether it's the threat of nuclear war, hurricanes, or Russian meddling, it seems nothing can unnerve investors bent on pushing the U.S. stock market higher and higher. Traders fear missing out on the bull market more than they fear losing. In the language of Wall Street, every day it's "risk-on."

Twitter Isn't Taking Fake News Seriously

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Twitter's headquarters sees "Ban Russian Bots" on its building. What's going on?

America’s Relationship with Mark Zuckerberg is ‘It’s Complicated’

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Facebook has 2 billion users, record profits, vast influence, and big problems in Washington. While on paternity leave, Facebook’s CEO has been unable to avoid what’s become a second full-time job: managing an escalating series of political crises.

Stand By . . . Scanning for Viruses and Secrets

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

It would appear that simply the inclusion of the word "Russia" sparks fears of espionage and fears of collusion to destroy the United States. To ramp that up even more, include cybersecurity in the discussion.

A Billionaire Emerges on the Silicon Steppe

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

A Russian software billionaire takes on SAP and Oracle. Boris Nuraliev has built a fortune with enterprise software tailored to Russian needs. He uses a franchise model in which partners are licensed to install its software and adapt it to the needs of each particular business.

A Billionaire Emerges on the Silicon Steppe

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Boris Nuraliev’s 1C has become Russia’s No. 2 seller of enterprise software. To keep growing, he’s seeking to expand into foreign markets.

The Red Tide Sweeping the Caribbean

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Russia and China are using investments, loans, and aid to court countries in a region once considered off-limits to them. Russia has reinvigorated its relations with Cuba by sending oil and building military infrastructure. Chinese companies and the government have poured $6 billion into the Central American and Caribbean area since 2012.

A Reputation for Badoo Behavior

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

The aligning of corporate culture with the vision and mission of the organization has always been assumed to be a strong antecedent to higher levels of performance. With companies such as Badoo, a dating site popular in Russia and Latin America, the human resource practices used to attract and retain personnel have flown in the face of current acceptable practices. Parties that include risqué activities have become legendary in its corporate offices in London. This troubles some, but obviously attracts the talent that Andrey Andreev, its founder, perceives to create the environment conducive to growing his profitable business.

Buying Syrian Shoes To Bolster Putin’s Pride

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

A patriotic shoe chain owner takes advantage of the rise in consumer nationalism to expand his business and increase sales by 30 percent.

All About the Benjamins

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

GM was once the leading global automaker with a presence in all of the major and emerging markets. But CEO Mary Barra has decided to ditch low profit-margin markets like India and Russia to focus on more profitable markets and invest in being a leader in new technologies.

How to Launder a Russian

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Russians have loaded up on Cyprus’s citizenship program that attracted $4.4 billion in foreign investment last year. Cypriot citizenship helps them avoid the prying eyes of their government and pay lower taxes, and may make it easier to move money, because banks see them as benign locals, rather than potentially suspicious foreigners. One Russian got citizenship after buying two Limassol villas.

Now on EBay: Russian Micro-Multinationals

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Small firms are using EBay to reach markets across borders. In Europe, sellers can now sign up to have items listed in multiple countries and have the descriptions translated into local languages. For EBay, more than half the company's revenue now comes from international markets.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

The United States has the biggest agriculture industry on earth, yet farmers face mounting pressure from Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. Those rival countries, as well as others, are well-positioned to profit from the United States pulling back from trade deals.

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The U.S. agriculture industry depends heavily on exports, with more than half of U.S. wheat, rice, cotton, and soybean production traded overseas. Uncertainty over Trump’s farm policy, along with his administration’s clear signals to scuttle multilateral trade agreements, could be good news for farmers in Russia, Brazil, and Ukraine. With Trump pulling out of the Trans Pacific Partnership on trade, which was backed by farmers, countries that remain in the partnership may have preferential access to important markets.

Toys "R" Russia? Retailer Detsky Mir Says, "Da"

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

Children’s products retailer Detsky Mir’s $355 million IPO could be a harbinger of better times for Russia’s consumer companies. As long as Russians, like Anna Krutevich, still plan to spend 15 percent of their income on their kids.

NATO Makes It Rain

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

NATO members will increase military budgets and spending, amid doubt they can rely on the United States. However, some members will fall short of the mandatory 2 percent of GDP. Weapons makers look forward to a spending spree as stocks surge.

The Yahoo! Hack Goes From Bad to Worse

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

FBI, CIA, NSA, and White House workers are among hacking victims of hacking attack of Yahoo! which occurred in 2013 that included more than 150,000 U.S. government and military employees. There is evidence to speculate that the buyer was a foreign intelligence agency.

Russia’s Deadly Mideast Game

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Putin uses small, viscous wars to keep himself popular at home in Russia. The Kremlin is doing more in the Mideast region than bombing Aleppo. Russia’s involvement in the Middle East ranges from energy deals with Qatar to power politics in Libya.

For Manufacturers, Russia Is Now a Bargain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The fall in the value of the ruble, along with real wage declines, has contributed to a boost in Russian exports of some manufactured goods. Although the cost of doing business in Russia is still higher than in many other countries, it is very competitive with eastern Europe, and exporting to Europe can make sense for goods with high transportation costs. Both IKEA and Samsung have recently expanded production at factories in Russia.

Microsoft Isn't Feeling Any Russian Thaw

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As a matter of national security, Russia is trying to develop more home-grown software and applications. It is also requiring that Russian consumers' data be stored on servers in Russia. For U.S. technology-based firms such as Google and Microsoft, not only can this mean lost revenue, it also contributes to the development of new competitors.

Crimea Welcomes a Flood of Putin Patriots

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Two years after Russia's annexation of Crimea, Russian tourists are everywhere. Russia's middle class now considers Crimea a vacation destination. Fortunately for Crimea's business community, the increase in Russian tourists has offset the fact that fewer foreign travelers are visiting the peninsula.

A Saudi About-Face

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has initiated plans to lead OPEC in production cuts that are designed to reduce the oil glut and raise crude oil prices globally. Production increases in non-OPEC countries and Saudi Arabia itself contributed to production that drove down prices. Now, the oil ministry is changing direction in order to steer prices higher and reduce the damaging economic impact on its own economy.

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine’s Agriculture

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Ukraine’s black earth could make the country a world leader in agriculture, but the country still suffers for a lack of finance and infrastructure. If Ukraine could settle its conflict with Russia over Crimea, foreign investors would have more confidence investing in the country.

India Is Cutting Oil Deals Worldwide

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India's oil consumption is growing at a 10 percent rate, with gasoline consumption growing even faster. The country, however, imports 75 percent of its oil due to limited domestic supplies. It is working with governments and oil companies in a diverse set of countries, including Iran, Mozambique, Russia, and Afghanistan, to help make sure it has a secure supply of oil to fuel its growing economy.

Now the Boss Can Monitor Your Phone

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Can companies now monitor your personal phone at work? It's happening in Russia.

An Amazon Wannabe Rises On the Steppes

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

After beating Google, Russia’s Yandex targets e-commerce. Shops now pay for “concrete transactions.” Yandex, looking to boost sales and attract more customers, is changing how it works with web vendors.

An Amazon Wannabe Rises On the Steppes

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Yandex can lay claim to running Russia's most successful search engine, as well as Moscow's largest ride-sharing service. In doing so, it has beat out, or at least garnered a strong head start, on Google and Uber. Now it is attempting to do the same with online retailing, offering an Amazon-like marketplace while Amazon has yet to offer its service in Russia.

Russia Could Be Headed for Deflation

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

A two-year economic contraction has led to a collapse in consumer demand. Russians are increasingly looking for savings on purchases and that is driving prices lower.

What Happened to Those Amber Waves?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Whereas the U.S. used to be the world's largest exporter of wheat, it has lost that position Russia, with Canada poised to push the U.S. to third place. The reasons behind this shift are complex, including improved supply from, and growing conditions in, Russia and Canada. The quality of U.S. wheat still commands a price premium in the market, but the rise in the U.S. dollar makes it less competitive in global markets.

Russian Debt Collectors Have a Short Fuse

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Total Russian consumer debt has more than doubled since 2008 to 10.3 trillion rubles. With about 10 percent of Russian consumer debt in arrears, the Russian parliament is considering legislation to regulate debt collection.

They're Hiring In Eastern Europe

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With the integration of Eastern European countries into the European Union, large disparities in wages across the EU became evident. As a result, many Western manufacturing firms started shifting labor intensive manufacturing jobs to Eastern regions. Meanwhile, many Eastern workers started looking westward for higher wages. The result of those two trends has now led to low unemployment in Eastern Europe, and companies are struggling to find enough workers for factory jobs.

A Saudi-Russian Oil Détente? Not Likely

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Saudi Arabia and Russia have a frayed relationship stemming from Russia’s failure in past crises to keep promises to reduce oil production. Thus, it's no surprise that Moscow’s current call for new talks with Saudi Arabia to limit oil production has fallen on deaf ears.

The IPO Aimed At Iran

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Why would Saudi Arabia consider an IPO at this time of historically low oil prices? Saudi Arabia is considering a new strategic ally in its cold war against Iran: The world’s 330 million owners of publicly traded stock.

Gazprom Is Losing Its Market Muscle

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

As Russia tries to defuse tensions with the West over the Ukraine and Crimea, Gazprom has stopped threatening to cut Ukraine and EU gas shipments. Increased competition from other natural gas suppliers to the EU have caused Gazprom to focus more on customer service.

For Indebted Russians, a Holiday Staycation

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Russian consumers who binge on credit wind up on the country's no-fly list. Last year, 1 in 8 Russian debtors had three or more outstanding loans, some with interest rates as high as 45 percent.

Bitcoin Can't Keep It Chill

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Bitcoin was starting to look like it would become more acceptable as a viable currency until its price inexplicably spiked 98 percent in the three weeks ending on Nov. 4, before dropping 20 percent the next day. Scammers and speculators are still fans, but it's not going to be useful for consumers and legitimate businesses until its volatility lessens and its price increases substantially.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

Dairy farms around the world are suffering from declining milk prices. A combination of reduced Chinese demand for imported milk and Russia’s ban on EU, American, and Australian milk has left the global market awash with milk. As a result, global dairy prices are falling with no turnaround in sight.

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

High prices for milk last year caused farmers in many countries to invest in increased production.This year, with markets slowing in China and trade tensions with Russia, global trade in dairy products is down. Hence, dairy farmers worldwide are in a tough financial bind.

Insider Trading Then and Now

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

It used to be complicated and expensive to cultivate and maintain a pipeline of contacts for insider trading with illicit stock tips. Now insider trading is much simpler to coordinate and execute.

Putin's Economic Solution

Derek Abrams  |  Economics

Putin is relying on oil exports, state-owned companies, and record defense spending to pull Russia out of recession.

McDonald’s Revamp Has Missing Ingredients

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has McDonald’s decided to respond to a decline in share price?

U.S. Carmakers Take Different Roads In Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Two competitors, two different strategies in Russia.

Exxon Needs Friends in High Places

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Exxon's big bets in Russia can't pay off until sanctions are lifted.

The Cybersleuth Who Saunas with Russian Spies

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Many cybersecurity firms work with governments, but close ties between Kaspersky and the Russian government are causing concern.

Fighting U.S. Extradition at All Costs

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Can the U.S. successfully prosecute Russian hackers?

Ordinary Russians Suffer Ruble Shock

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The currency this year has dropped almost 30 percent against the dollar.

Ordinary Russians Suffer Ruble Shock

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The declining value of the Russian ruble is making imports more expensive, thus impacting consumer spending and importers' business.

The Whale Stays in the Picture

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Can SeaWorld overcome the backlash over its treatment of marine animals?

Legacy of the Wall

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

The shadow of Communism lingers 25 years on.

The Saudi Balancing Act

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

By boosting production and lowering prices, Saudi Arabia has helped create a bear market in oil.

Datsun's Second Life Isn't So Good, After All

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Resurrected in emerging markets, Datsun's cars are viewed as too cheap.

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

Why Sanctions Won't Stop U.S. Oil Drilling in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Sanctions against Russia over its Ukraine policy won't impact a key source of Russian revenue—oil—because the West doesn't want to see higher oil prices.

This Apple Was Once Headed To Russia: Not Anymore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

As a result of the conflict in Ukraine, exports of many agricultural products from the EU to Russia have stopped, which is good news for EU consumers, bad news for EU farmers.

This Apple Was Once Headed to Russia. Not Anymore.

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Russia’s ban on EU fruit and vegetables has hit farmers and triggered fears of deflation.

Putin’s Paradox

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

As patriotic fervor flourishes, Russian consumers cut spending.

Another World Cup Surprise: TV Ratings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

After tremendous doubt about Brazil’s ability to make it happen, the World Cup wins. The match between the U.S. and Portugal on ESPN drew 18.2 million viewers, a record for soccer. Brave World Cup sponsors could not be happier.

Putin's Next Invasion? The Russian Web

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Russia has been shutting down some websites and enacting new regulations that require foreign tech companies to store data on servers in Russia.

Merkel Gets Tough on Russia

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Germany is exploring the possibility of harsh sanctions. Will Europe follow?

Russia's Growth Was Already Slowing—Then Came Crimea

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

The tensions and resulting sanctions over Russia's seizure of Crimea are likely to reduce the ruble's value significantly and undo years of progress in Russia's financial and monetary policies.

The Epic Hack

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Target's security monitors in India noticed the malware on its U.S. servers almost immediately, but the red flags were ignored.

A Russian Mogul Takes on Diageo

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A Russian businessman tries to consolidate vodka production.

The Blogger Hackers Love to Hate

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

A former reporter's talent for exposing the weaknesses in online security has earned him respect in the IT business and loathing among cybercriminals.

Putin's Olympic Fiasco

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

The amount of corruption associated with the record $51 billion spent on the Sochi Olympic Games has been unprecedented. Where is this corruption occurring, and will the games be affected?

Russia's Web Payment Czar Looks West

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Russia, cash is king, with many consumers looking to e-cash rather than banks or credit cards to pay their bills.

Chemical Companies Are Rushing To The U.S.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Abundant natural gas in the U.S. is driving investment in chemical, plastics, and fertilizer plants on the Gulf Coast.

Nissan Brings Datsun Back to the Future

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

It worked before, and Nissan is betting it will work again. Nissan is dusting off its Datsun brand and will sell cars starting at less than $6,650 in Indonesia, Russia, and South Africa.

Crocs Wants You To Forget About Its Crocs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Crocs is looking at a new image and international growth to spur sales.

Welcome Back, Comrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Media companies are now producing original content sit-coms, dramas, and mini-series in Eastern European countries.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

PepsiCo says it will use its acquired yogurt distribution system in Russia to try to transform the region into a major consumer of packaged snack foods.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Business Fundamentals

With its $4.2 billion acquisition of Wimm-Bill-Dann last year, PepsiCo is now the biggest food and beverage maker in Russia. PepsiCo's objective of using Russia as a springboard to reach customers in former Soviet republics won't be without huge challenges, but the payback also could be huge.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

PepsiCo collects $5 billion in annual sales in Russia, its second-largest market after the U.S., which it’s using as a staging ground for expansion into fast-growing Eastern Europe.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Pepsi is investing in healthy (and not so healthy) foods in the former USSR, while adapting products to local tastes.

PepsiCo Prepares For a Snack War in Russia

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

PepsiCo sells $5 billion worth of products a year in Russia and is using the market as a staging ground for expansion into Eastern Europe. And it's not just about selling Pepsi anymore.

Gimme Shelter

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Which countries are now the most popular tax havens?

A Tennis Star Seeks the Sweet Taste of Success

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

What do you get when you cross a Russian-born tennis star with a gummy candy? Maria Sharapova is betting $500,000 that the answer is a profitable, upscale candy company.

China’s Smartphone Market Welcomes Dumbphones

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

China is now the world’s largest smartphone market and home to Lenovo, the world’s biggest PC vendor. In 2013, Lenovo is working to get every phone sale possible. Look out Apple?

It's Happy Hour for Jim Beam in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Imported American whiskey is doing well in Russia, while vodka and beer experience a decline.

In Case of Emergency, Log On

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Traditionally, relief efforts in natural disasters have awaited governmental agencies' coordination or major relief organizations efforts to begin the healing process. A startup, Recovers.org, founded by Caitria O'Neill, a Harvard graduate who studied Soviet Russia, and her sister had its genesis in her hometown's tornado devastation in 2011.

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cost cutting at AB InBev has recently caused profits to climb, but sales have suffered. Is the attempt to cut costs affecting the taste of the beers AB InBev brews?

The Gap between Rich and Poor Widens

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

What do income equality metrics suggest about U.S. business and society?

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

Uniting the Muslim World, One Cat Photo at a Time

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Can core Muslim values be upheld on a social networking site?

Soviet Bonds Are Haunting Putin

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Repaying its decades-old loans would cost Russia $785 billion.

Russia's Bad Boy Hunts for U.S. Tech Treasure

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Russia's state-owned Rusnano invests in foreign firms, with a goal of transferring technology back to Russia.

Doing Business With the Frenemy

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The U.S. military has sourced $400 million worth of helicopters from an unlikely source: the same Russian military contractor that is arming the Syrian government.

Mr. Senator, Tear Down This Wall

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D.  |  Business Law

In 2011, just 0.6 percent of U.S. exports went to Russia. If Congress repeals Soviet-era trade restrictions, the flow of goods will spike.

China's Export Machine Gets an Upgrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China shifts its export focus from shoes and t-shirts to heavy industry.

A False Brigade

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Can the emerging economies save Europe?

The History Behind Exxon's Arctic Coup

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Exxon's new agreement with Russia's Rosneft was preceded by years collaboration.

Yankee Chicken Go Home!

Hope Torkomoo, PhD  |  Accounting & Taxation

How would you move an oversupply of dark meat?

Fathers, Sons, and Russian Power Games

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

When President Medvedev barred senior government officials from serving on the boards of companies they regulate, they simply resigned and had their sons appointed.

Separating the State and the Boardroom

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

By not allowing government officials to serve on corporate boards of companies they regulate, Russia is taking a step towards better governance.

Hungry for a Solution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can a rainy spring in Saskatchewan contribute to the overthrow of a government in Tunisia?

Dreams of an iPad Economy for Russia

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is in store for the Russian economy?

In France, There's Pain in the Rising Cost of Pain

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Due to a drought in Russia and floods in Canada and Australia, wheat prices have doubled in the past year. Now the French are seeing increases in the price of baguettes.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

Food: Freaky Weather, Scary Prices

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

While food may be consumed locally, it is grown worldwide. The price of groceries in the U.S. is directly impacted by the weather in Argentina, Russia, Australia and everywhere else in the world.

Facebook's Initial Private Offering

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Facebook's new $450 million deal with Goldman Sachs is a triumph of anti-democratic investing and a signal that tougher regulations have not taken away Goldman's magic.

Facebook's Initial Private Offering

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Facebook's new $450 million deal with Goldman Sachs is a triumph of anti-democratic investing and a signal that tougher regulations have not taken away Goldman's magic.

Facebook's Initial Private Offering

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Facebook's new $450 million deal with Goldman Sachs is a triumph of anti-democratic investing and a signal that tougher regulations have not taken away Goldman's magic.

A Global Scare in Food Prices

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

With drought and flood hurting harvests - and population growth increasing demand - some forecasters see significant food price increases in 2011.

Drop Russia, Add Indonesia: The Debate Is On

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Detractors say that Russia is not keeping up with others in the BRIC, while Indonesia deserves to be considered a fast-rising economic power.

Coke's Last Round

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The developed world can't drink any more Coke, and India and China are saturated with competitors. That leaves Africa as the last great growth opportunity for Coke.

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

The 20-Year Miracle

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Has modern Germany overcome its historical challenges?

Never Miss A Good Crisis

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Shaking off disgrace and a $1.6 billion fine, the German conglomerate aims to build the world's infrastructure, especially in emerging markets.

How BP Learned to Dance With the Russian Bear

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Although the relationship between BP and Russia has been tense at times, both now seem to see the benefits of working together

'Rural Outsourcers' Vs. Bangalore

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Rural middle America costs less than the East and West Coast, and is easier to deal with than India or Russia

A Three-Way Food Fight in Brazil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In Latin America's largest market, Wal-Mart is spending big to overtake Carrefour and a local rival.

Your Handy Guide to Russia's Oligarchs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With the country's market soaring, Russian billionaires are seeing their fortunes revive

A 'Condom' That Keeps PCs Safe

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Many have tried, but no one has yet hacked past InZero's protective layer

Deadly Business in Moscow

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Corruption has its price. In Russia, it limits the country

Deadly Business in Moscow

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The lawlessness of the legal system can make business in Russia difficult.

Deadly Business in Moscow

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Russia has fallen out of favor with international investors because of its corruption and abuse of business people.

Endless Oil

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Is the global oil supply endless?

A French Wal-Mart's Global Blitz

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Mega-retailer Auchan has a powerful patriarch, a secretive culture, and an insatiable urge to expand.

The Peril and Promise of Investing in Russia

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

It's still risky, but for global corporations, the country is simply too big - and too rich - to ignore.

BP Keeps Rolling the Dice

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

BP continues its high-risk, high-reward strategy in its search for petroleum. It has recently paid off in the Gulf of Mexico.

IKEA in Russia: Enough Is Enough

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

IKEA won't capitulate to demands made by potentially corrupt local officials in Russia.

IKEA in Russia: Enough Is Enough

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Red tape has prompted the Swedish retailer to put further investment in the country on hold.

China's Doubts about the Dollar

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What will U.S. deficits do to the value of the dollar?

Russia's Factories Shift Gears

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Two companies have hired Western consultancies to help redesign Soviet-era plant floors, cut costs, and boost productivity. It's working for them and may be a model for other Russian companies.

Chavez Targets the Drillers

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Lower oil prices are putting pressure on the Venezuelan oil industry, which is trying to squeeze oil services contractors.

Philip Morris Unbound

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Freed from Altria, Philip Morris International CEO Louis Camilleri is pushing hard to boost global sales before U.S.-style tobacco restrictions spread.

The Krisis in Russia's Industrial Heartland

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Tensions rise as once-booming Yaroslavl and other factory cities come to a screeching halt.

Russia's Lawyers in the Crosshairs

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Human rights advocates have long been targets. These days corporate attorneys are under attack, too.

A Hundred Factories Too Many

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Can carmakers scale down production and then ramp back up when demand starts to recover?

Russia's Economy Turns Swiftly Siberian

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Free-falling oil prices and exposure to Western financing are causing havoc in Russia.

The Taking of NASA's Secrets

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

In order to save billions of dollars in research and development, some countries are using hackers to steal valuable information from America's military and scientific institutions and the defense industry that serves them.

Cisco's Brave New World

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cisco, the technology company that sells everything from million-dollar routers to videoconferencing systems, also has consulting services to help companies and countries upgrade their infrastructure.

A Power Shift in the World of Oil

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Producers from Russia and other parts of the world are becoming major players in the energy industry.

A Power Shift in the World of Oil

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

New data from Platts show producers from Russia and elsewhere are gaining on the top multinationals.

The Business Boom Unfolding Down on the Russian Farm

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Investors are pouring billions into agribusiness and trying to reverse decades of Soviet mismanagement.

Bloodied but Still Strong

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What is the global view of the U.S. economy?

Russian Stocks in Free Fall

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Foreign and local investors flee Russian equity markets as part of a vicious circle.

Kazakh Oil: A War of Nerves

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The Tengiz oil field in Kazakhstan is one of the world's biggest. Shipping the oil to western markets is proving to be very challenging.

Pipeline Wars

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

What happened to the U.S.'s energy diplomacy?

Pipeline Wars

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The Russian invasion of Georgia can be attributed, at least in part, as a means to reassert influence over Western Europe by controlling the flow of energy.

BP's Dream Deal Hits a Rough Patch

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

BP's joint venture in Russia has been a high-risk, high-reward endeavor.

All Eyes on India's Nuclear Prize

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

India plans to build 30 new nuclear reactors over the next 10 years, but American firms will have a difficult time winning many contracts.

Welding a New Metals Giant

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Russia is working to create one of the world's largest mining and metals firms by merging some local firms that could compete on a global scale with other multinational firms.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Russia's Yandex has a strong position relative to Google in the local market.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

Few outside of Russia have heard of Yandex, a search engine that has 44% of the Russian market (10 points more than Google). Yandex is expected to hit the Nasdaq this fall in Russia's largest-ever initial public offering in tech.

Where Google Isn't Goliath

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Entrepreneurship

Russia's Yandex, set to go public on Nasdaq, is innovating in a hurry to hold off the U.S. giant.

Facing an Auto Slump, Japan Lifts Capacity

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Japanese carmakers are expanding at home, where nimble, high-tech plants offer more flexibility and higher quality.

Cancer's Cruel Economics

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

In the fight against cancer, is the FDA part of the problem?

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault-Nissan, is working to position his company for the new reality of the worldwide auto industry: increased demand for smaller, more fuel-efficient cars designed to appeal to local market needs and tastes.

Ghosn Hits the Accelerator

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

The Renault-Nissan CEO is fighting to keep pace in the U.S. and chasing Chinese and Indian customers.

Carlos Ghosn's Russian Gambit

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Renault is betting that an old Russian Lada factory can become a large producer of low-cost automobiles.

Carlos Ghosn's Russian Gambit

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Carlos Ghosn, the Renault CEO, is betting that a shabby Soviet-era factory can be the linchpin in a low-cost-car strategy.

Managing the Global Workforce

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Multinational companies face many human resource management challenges as they seek to match talent from all over the world with client needs.

The Stealth Oil Giant

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Schlumberger has figured out better than anyone else how the global oil game has changed, and it's helping to drive that change. The company is increasing its cooperation with Big Oil's most prominent rivals, state-owned oil companies, and it's helping a group of smaller upstarts that are seeking to get into the business, such as hedge funds and private equity outfits.

Now It's Really International Paper

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

International Paper historically has not been very international. That is changing as it invests in pulp and paper production in Russia, Brazil, China, and other locations around the globe.

Russian Labor Raises Its Voice

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Will labor costs drive the cost of doing business in Russia?

Russian Labor Raises Its Voice

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A strike at Ford and other recent labor actions suggest that Russian workers may be more willing to go on strike than in the past. Multinational companies are also a primary target.

Paving a 'Road to Russia's Future'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Russia is looking to raise $1 trillion over the next decade, 80% from private sources, to fund infrastructure development. This is creating some opportunities for multinational construction firms and investors.

The New Financial Heavyweights

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Sovereign funds totaling $2.8 trillion from China, the Mideast and elsewhere are redrawing the global investment map.

Sotheby’s Surprising Sizzle

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

Despite the fact hedge fund collectors have taken a hit, international buyers are pouring into the art market, according to the BusinessWeek article Sotheby's Surprizing Sizzle (November 12, 2007).


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