Regions

The Asian Jobs Ladder Is Broken

Thomas Coe  |  Business Fundamentals

The steps to economic development for poor countries may be tripped up by automation. Even countries that offer cheap labor for basic industries may find that they cannot compete against technology taking away potential jobs.

500,000 Tons of Steel. 14 Jobs

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

As politicians and countries maneuver to keep steel mills and other factories at home, the companies are maneuvering to maintain their competitiveness through automation. Voestalpine AG’s fully automated steel wire plant has only 14 jobs, but they are “really attractive.”

The Asian Jobs Ladder Is Broken

Bob Cohen, MBA  |  Career Readiness - Exploring Your Potential

An economic model that has sustained part of the world for years may now suffer the same fate as other global industries: automation.

The Asian Jobs Ladder Is Broken

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

For the past several decades, labor-intensive manufacturing of textiles and clothing has shifted from higher wage countries to lower wage countries, and in the process helped bring jobs and economic growth to increasingly poorer countries. With advances in technology and automation, however, that regular shift to the next country with lower pay levels may be coming to an end.

The Price of a Digital World

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Twenty-five years ago, U.S. chipmakers vowed to stop using chemicals that caused miscarriages and birth defects. And they did—by outsourcing the danger to women in Asia.

The Price of a Digital World

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

In the 1980s and 1990s, a series of studies in the United States showed that workers at semiconductor manufacturing facilities had abnormally high rates of miscarriages. The US industry responded by trying to eliminate many of the most noxious chemicals, improve working conditions, and shifting semiconductor manufacturing to other countries. More recently, the handling of highly toxic chemicals in semiconductor plants has also been associated with a number of other health problems, including cancer, infertility, and birth defects in the children of male workers.

China's Robot Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China is fast becoming one of the larger markets for workplace automation. This has led to the development of a large number of Chinese companies in the robotics and automation industries, though many currently just assemble components designed and manufactured by leading German, American, and Japanese robotics companies. But in the process, these companies and Chinese central planners are working to create a competitive robotics industry in China.

Finally, Some Good News for Shipyards

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The shipbuilding industry has taken a significant hit in recent years, as low oil prices decreased demand for oil tankers and offshore drilling rigs. There is now a bit of hope, however, as demand for liquefied natural gas is driving demand for gas tankers. Demand for electricity in India and China is boosting demand for clean electricity-generating technologies, hence demand for liquefied natural gas from the Americas.

Samsung's New Board Gets Back to Business

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Large family-dominated conglomerates, called chaebol, have significant influence in Korean business. The nine largest companies in South Korea are responsible for 75 percent of the country's gross domestic product and have significant influence over government policies. A bribery investigation that implicates both the country's president and the leader of Samsung has led to renewed calls for reform of these highly successful conglomerates.

Trump Threatens to Undo NAFTA's Auto Alley

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The supply chain in the automotive industry is incredibly complex, with parts coming together into subassemblies and then joined with other subassemblies before being assembled into final vehicles. Under NAFTA, regardless of the North American country where final assembly takes place, most vehicles are made from parts manufactured or assembled in the other two countries and other countries worldwide. Simple-minded ideas such as imposing a tax on imports from Mexico sounds like a way of shifting manufacturing to the United States but may result in fewer U.S. manufacturing jobs if auto manufacturers shift production outside NAFTA to lower prices for consumers.

South Korea Tries to Curb the Chaebol

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Business Strategy

The movement to reduce the power of South Korea’s Chaebol is gaining strength as prosecutors have tied them to the scandal that led to President Park’s impeachment. Corporate executives are keeping their heads down in the hope that the populist anger against them will subside.

Snooze

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

An Olympics TV ratings slip among viewers age 18-34 is raising questions about NBC’s ability to profit from the games long term. One reason: Sports fans are getting older.

Asia Is Getting Its Own Patent Police

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Operations Management

Asia is getting its own patent police. Government-backed firms seek fees in the United States and elsewhere. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tech companies are starting to use their patent stores more aggressively against rivals.

Samsung and LG Have A Battery Problem

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Samsung and LG have been successful selling NCM batteries (nickel, cobalt, and manganese) for electric vehicles in China, with much of that success related to generous subsidies the Chinese government has provided to electric buses. A goal in stimulating the use of electric buses is to decrease pollution in China's cities. The government will continue providing subsidies, but only to the less expensive LFP batteries (lithium-iron-phosphate), which are available from a number of Chinese suppliers.

So Many Boats, So Little Cargo

Eric Cardella  |  Economics

As commodity prices continue to lag and China’s economy continues to struggle, shipbuilders, cargo companies, and port operators are facing financial hardships as they feel the squeeze from slowing business.

In Japan, Mobile Money is an Also-Ran

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

With all its interest in tech gadgets and automation, it's easy to think Japan would be on the forefront of mobile phone and Internet-based banking—but it isn't. In fact, Japan has one of the lower rates of mobile banking adoption in the world behind India and Nigeria. Japanese customers have a preference for cash, and visiting luxurious bank branches to access their cash.

McDonald’s Revamp Has Missing Ingredients

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

How has McDonald’s decided to respond to a decline in share price?

Zara Follows Shoppers Into the Bedroom

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Zara Home is helping propel growth at the world's largest retailer.

Samsung’s China Problems Come to India

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Accounting & Taxation

Cheaper smartphones eat away at the South Korean company's lead.

Samsung's War at Home

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

Troubling allegations raise questions about Samsung's responsibility for its employees' illnesses and deaths.

Thank You For Vaping

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Information Technology

Scented vapors with my nicotine, please.

What’s Roiling the Waters Of Global Trade

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Emerging market demand has slowed as China’s economy cools.

Korea’s Daring Bet on The Arctic Sea Lanes

Brian Kench, Ph.D.  |  Economics

Despite considerable risks and costs, Korea wants a commercial presence in the Arctic.

Nissan Brings Datsun Back to the Future

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

It worked before, and Nissan is betting it will work again. Nissan is dusting off its Datsun brand and will sell cars starting at less than $6,650 in Indonesia, Russia, and South Africa.

Think Colossal

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Samsung is now the top seller of smartphones, the number one manufacturer of LCD televisions, the seller of more flash memory and RAM chips than any other company, and passed Nokia to become the world’s largest mobile phone manufacturer. What next?

The March of Robots Into Chinese Factories

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

China is adding lots of robots to its manufacturing production lines. That's good for its competitiveness and productivity, not so good for the displaced workers.

“Made in USA” Still Sells

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

Classic American brands have growing international appeal.

China is Really Big. Its Brands, Not so Much.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

China's biggest brands look to Western markets for higher profits.

The New Smartphone Powerhouse: Huawei

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Huawei has moved up from number seven worldwide in the smartphone market to perhaps number three.

China Eyes Japan as the Land of Opportunity

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Chinese companies are looking to build their reputation, and their quality, by capturing market share in Japan.

The Cruelest Catch

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Org Behavior & HR

American consumers don't know it, but they are buying a lot of the fish caught by illegally indentured workers.

Go North to the DMZ, Young Man

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Marketing

North Korea is now attracting foreign companies that have a tolerance for risk and government meddling and China is leading the pack. What are the risks and rewards of marketing north of the DMZ and why are companies acting so quickly?

Tankers That Won't Kill You at the Gas Pump

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Hurt by the strong yen, Japanese boatbuilders employ a marketing pitch that stresses fuel efficiency.

A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Higher wages in China and smarter factories in the U.S. may boost American manufacturing - if U.S. unions and big government don't get in the way.

Why Caterpillar Digs a Colombian Trade Deal

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

A trade pact could boost U.S. exports by $1.1 billion, with companies such as Caterpillar, GE, Wal-Mart, and Citigroup as beneficiaries of expanded binational operations. All exporting operations managers should take note.

Why Caterpillar Digs a Colombian Trade Deal

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

A trade pact could boost U.S. exports by $1.1 billion, with companies such as GE, Wal-Mart, Caterpillar, and Citigroup as big beneficiaries.

Flat Tax: Slovakia's Killer App

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

Complex and generally considered unfair, the U.S. tax system needs an overhaul. Here's an idea from Slovakia on how to get it done.

Rise of the Machines (Again)

James J. Stewart, DSc  |  Operations Management

U.S. companies chase the fast-growing market for service bots. In part, they're trying to catch up with European and Asian companies.

Uniqlo: Asia's Top Clothier Goes Back to Basics

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Japan's Fast Retailing stumbled in a move into fashion at its Uniqlo chain, and faces tough competition from Sweden's H&M and Spain's Zara.

A Trade Deal's Long and Winding Road

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The recent U.S. trade deal with South Korea serves as a template for how to work with other nations as well as domestic unions, executives and politicians.

Behold!

Douglas W. Lyon, Ph.D., CPA  |  Business Fundamentals

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Behold!

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Finance

The stock market in Peru went from 23 to 23,000 in 16 years. Surprised? Your next money-making opportunity is in the last place you

Online Startups Target College Book Costs

Charles Newman, PHD  |  Accounting & Taxation

A wave of startups such as Flat World Knowledge hopes to use technology to change the economics of higher education

Brownnosing for Google Broadband

David George Vequist IV, Ph.D.  |  Accounting & Taxation

If American Internet service gets faster, people will likely spend more time online watching videos and playing games, providing Google fresh ways to expand its advertising business

Do the Chaebol Choke Off Innovation?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

South Korea's giant family-based conglomerates are thriving, but they may be crushing small companies.

Should Developing Nations Clamp Down on Hot Money?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

Capital controls may be making a comeback as countries try to control inflationary bubbles.

GM's Korean Quandary

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  International Business

GM's debt-swamped Daewoo division is slumping badly, but it's too important to GM to sell.

State Capitalism

Robert A. Clark, MBA, Ph.D.  |  Finance

Will free enterprise survive the current recession?


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