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Search Results (300 Found)

'I Need More Mexicans'

Derek Abrams, Economics

Since President Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders targeting immigration in January, arrests of suspected un ...

Where Buffet Failed

Eric Cardella, Economics

Dexter Shoe Co was once the largest employer in Dexter, Maine, employing some 800 people. In the mid-1990s, the company ...

The Red Tide Sweeping the Caribbean

Derek Abrams, Economics

As supplies of crude from its old ally Venezuela dwindled last year, Cuba began turning out the lights in government off ...

Is There a Better Way to Take Aim at Inflation?

Derek Abrams, Economics

The Federal Reserve would never get a medal in archery. Since January 2012, when it publicly adopted a target of 2 ...

Can Puerto Rico Corral Its Tax Dodgers?

Derek Abrams, Economics

Estimates are that about a third of Puerto Rico’s gross national product—as much as $21 billion—is pro ...

The Airbnb of Warehousing

Eric Cardella, Economics

As online sales continue to dominate the retail space, one of the biggest challenges for small startups and online merch ...

Faces of the Venezuelan Exodus

Derek Abrams, Economics

There are no official statistics on how many Venezuelans have emigrated to the United States, but according to U.S. Citi ...

Philippine Casinos Are Cleaning Up

Eric Cardella, Economics

A walk through a VIP room at a Philippine casino reveals an interesting sight—the lack actual high rollers present ...

Will the Trump Bump Go Thunk?

Derek Abrams, Economics

There was always something precarious about the Trump Bump, the surge of enthusiasm among investors and business leaders ...

Whole Foods Market's Identity Crisis

Eric Cardella, Economics

Investors are starting to question whether John Mackey, the founder and CEO of Whole Foods Market Inc., can turn things ...

The Fed Keeps Its Eye on Swings in the Stock Market

Derek Abrams, Economics

William Dudley, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, has long believed that Fed policymakers should pay mo ...

Achtung, Berlin: Your Flight Is Five Years Late

Derek Abrams, Economics

The inaugural flight from Berlin’s new international airport is almost five years late and no one can say when or ...

The Housing Crunch Hits the Heartland

Eric Cardella, Economics

As the spring season approaches, many potential home buyers will be canvasing the market. Unfortunately, listings in the ...

India's War Over Water — and Soft Drinks

Derek Abrams, Economics

India is one of the most water-challenged nations, and fights over water erupt periodically between states and user ...

Why the Oil Glut Isn’t Gone Yet

Eric Cardella, Economics

When oil prices plummeted to around $26 per barrel, most domestic shale producers were struggling to stay afloat. Saudi ...

Brazil Has a School Problem

Derek Abrams, Economics

Brazil’s state universities enjoy a sterling reputation. But students who qualify for admission come largely from ...

Should Farmers Fear Trump?

Derek Abrams, Economics

Unlike sectors such as manufacturing, where trade deals are blamed for job losses, U.S. agriculture has benefited from g ...

Big Meat Braces for a Labor Shortage

Eric Cardella, Economics

The meat packing industry is one of the largest employers of immigrants and refugees. Not surprisingly, the recent refug ...

The Wall Needs the Consent of Many

Derek Abrams, Economics

Along with a potential lack of concrete and documented construction workers, one of the main hurdles President Donald Tr ...

IBM's Big Jobs Dodge

Eric Cardella, Economics

Last month at a summit between technology executives and President Trump, Ginni Rometty, IBM’s CEO, publicly pledg ...

The War in Yemen Tests Saudi Arabia's Clout

Derek Abrams, Economics

Saudi Arabia has engaged in a policy to translate its oil wealth into greater regional clout, but there have been very f ...

The Latest Shortage: Fast-Food Workers

Eric Cardella, Economics

The unemployment rate is at its lowest level in almost a decade, at 4.7 percent, and President-elect Donald Trump has pr ...

No Golden Years for China's Villagers

Derek Abrams, Economics

China's rural communities are suffering the twin effects of China's one-child policy and decades of migration to the cit ...

Russia’s Deadly Mideast Game

Derek Abrams, Economics

With its devastating show of force in Syria’s civil war, Russia has reasserted itself as a military power in the M ...

Everybody Must Get Streamed

Eric Cardella, Economics

Live streaming has become the modern version of the blogging sensation a decade ago. Thanks in part to big companies lik ...

The Great Indian Tax Dodge of 2016

Derek Abrams, Economics

Last month, India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, announced the demonetization of 86 percent of the country's currency ...

Hulu Reboots for a Post-Cable Age

Eric Cardella, Economics

As consumers’ dissatisfaction with the cost of traditional cable TV increases, there is a growing trend to stop pa ...

India’s Cash-Canceling Experiment

Derek Abrams, Economics

On November 8, 2016, India Prime Minister Narendra Modi stunned the country by announcing that the 500-rupee and 1,000-r ...

American Producers See an Election Boost

Eric Cardella, Economics

U.S. steel producers are optimistic about the future state of the US streel industry after Trump’s election to the ...

Argentina Finds Free Trade Is Hard to Do

Derek Abrams, Economics

President Mauricio Macri took office promising to lift the trade barriers that made Argentina one of the most closed eco ...

LG Sees an Opening in the Smart Home

Eric Cardella, Economics

Samsung's Note 7 isn't the only product the Korean company is having problems with; the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Com ...

Crimea Welcomes a Flood of Putin Patriots

Derek Abrams, Economics

Largely left in disrepair following the collapse of the USSR two decades ago, the Crimean peninsula suddenly finds itsel ...

A Continent Divided

Derek Abrams, Economics

As Europeans assess the fallout from the UK’s Brexit referendum, they face a series of elections that could equall ...

That BOOM You Hear Is Ukraine’s Agriculture

Derek Abrams, Economics

Ever since the 2014 Maidan revolution that replaced the pro-Russian government of Viktor Yanukovych with a pro-European ...

Baby, You Can Rent My Car

Eric Cardella, Economics

In Europe, the peer-to-peer car-sharing industry has really started to accelerate. Companies like Amovens, BlaBlaCar, Dr ...

Greece’s Least Wanted Man Lives in Maryland

Derek Abrams, Economics

For twenty-one years, Andreas Georgiou worked in relative obscurity as an economist at the International Monetary Fund i ...

On Tap at Guinness: Strawberry Porter

Eric Cardella, Economics

Open Gate Brewery, a small-batch pub that is on the backside of the massive Guinness plant in Dublin has recently ventur ...

U.S. Treasury Targets Foreign Tax Credit Use Amid EU’s Probes

Derek Abrams, Economics

As a result of the European Union's push to have its member states collect more taxes from U.S. companies' overseas unit ...

Brazil’s Economic Policy Lurches Right

Derek Abrams, Economics

Brazil is in the peculiar spot of being in deep recession. Excessive expansion of welfare benefits left the Brazilian go ...

Healthy Meals for the Grab-and-Go Crowd

Eric Cardella, Economics

Traditionally, companies like Weight Watchers that produce ready-made meals make the customer choose between low calorie ...

261 Words to End a 43-Year Marriage

Derek Abrams, Economics

The U.K.’s departure from the European Union may turn out to be the most tortured divorce proceeding in history. T ...

Beijing Cuts the Military With Big Buyouts

Derek Abrams, Economics

Chinese President Xi Jinping has a plan to overhaul the world’s largest army. Representing the biggest shake-up of ...

Tweaking the Sales Pitch for Drones

Eric Cardella, Economics

SZ DJI Technology, commonly referred to as DJI, is the largest manufacturer of drones. The ten-year-old Chinese company ...

Taking the Measure of Britain’s New Normal

Derek Abrams, Economics

Brexit is beginning to bite. In the short term, the U.K. economy may be headed for a contraction. One month after U.K. v ...

Vaccine Makers Target Pregnant Women

Eric Cardella, Economics

Recently, pharmaceutical companies have been developing new vaccines to target a new market—pregnant mothers and t ...

Populist Politicians Take On Italy’s Massive Debt Pile

Derek Abrams, Economics

Italy’s debt is spurring increasing frustration among voters, imperiling Prime Minister Renzi and benefiting the p ...

Flights are Full. Pilot Ranks, Not So Much

Eric Cardella, Economics

The major airlines in the U.S. are facing a major problem: a looming shortage of qualified pilots. It is estimated that ...

As Europe Drops Coal, Poland Embraces It

Derek Abrams, Economics

The World Health Organization estimates that two-thirds of the European Union's 50 most-polluted cities are in Poland. T ...

The Land Rush In Myanmar

Derek Abrams, Economics

The United States first imposed sanctions in 1990 on Myanmar’s military rulers to get them and their supporters to ...

A More Comfortable Berth for Lobsters

Eric Cardella, Economics

In Europe, lobster is very expensive because delivery of the live crustaceans has traditionally required air transport f ...

Puerto Rico Needs an Economy

Derek Abrams, Economics

Earlier this month, Puerto Rico defaulted on $370 million in loans to creditors. U.S. politicians in Congress are now pr ...

The Market Sizes Up

Eric Cardella, Economics

It is not a great surprise that traditional brick-and-mortar clothing retailers have recently been struggling to increas ...

China Decides Debt Can Be Dangerous

Derek Abrams, Economics

Since the Chinese government provided billions of dollars in loans to weather the 2008 financial crisis, overall debt gr ...

A Much Closer Look at Nap Time

Eric Cardella, Economics

Childcare centers and preschools in the United States are big business, generating nearly $53 billion in revenue per yea ...

Russia Could Be Headed for Deflation

Derek Abrams, Economics

Russia has struggled to keep prices in check for decades. During the 1990s, inflation peaked at more than 2,500 percent. ...

Fences of Fear

Derek Abrams, Economics

Europe’s open borders power an economy of more than 400 million people, with 24 million business trips and 57 mill ...

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Eric Cardella, Economics

The recent explosion in the creation of original television programming from companies like Netlfix, Amazon, and Hulu ha ...

The U.S. Is a Big Oil Importer Again

Derek Abrams, Economics

In the three months since the U.S. lifted its 40-year ban on crude oil exports, U.S. crude shipments to foreign buyers h ...

Google Kicks Its Car Fight Upstairs

Eric Cardella, Economics

Google and other technology companies are continuing to make strides in the innovation and development of self-driving c ...

Discouraged Workers Dog Europe’s Recovery

Derek Abrams, Economics

Typically, during periods of economic recovery, the number of discouraged workers decline as people resume looking for j ...

Massage Apps Get a Pat on the Back

Eric Cardella, Economics

Two recent start-ups, Soothe and Zeel, have recently revolutionized the massage industry. Traditionally, customers would ...

Russian Debt Collectors Have a Short Fuse

Derek Abrams, Economics

As the Russian economy recovered from the 2008 financial crisis, Russia’s consumers went on a borrowing spree. Fur ...

Nascar Takes a Page From the NFL Playbook

Eric Cardella, Economics

Since the financial crisis in 2008, the popularity of Nascar has been dwindling, attendance is down, and longtime sponso ...

Detroit’s Comeback Has an Arabic Accent

Derek Abrams, Economics

Over the last fifteen years, 131,010 refugees from the war-torn nations of Iraq and Syria have immigrated to the US. Mic ...

So Many Boats, So Little Cargo

Eric Cardella, Economics

As the global economy recovered out of the recession in 2009, commodity prices were rising and China’s economy was ...

A Saudi-Russian Oil Détente? Not Likely

Derek Abrams, Economics

A possible pact to cut oil production by Russia and Saudi Arabia has collapsed even before talks were set. Saudi Arabia ...

No Cheers When Wal-Mart Packs Up

Eric Cardella, Economics

Over the past several decades, Wal-Mart has been methodically expanding and opening new locations in what seems lik ...

1 Country, 1 Promise = 1 Million Barrels a Day

Derek Abrams, Economics

Iran wants to recover its place as OPEC’s No. 2 oil producer, but first it has to make sure it can meet an ambitio ...

SUVs Are T-Boning the Family Sedan

Eric Cardella, Economics

More and more families are turning to small, compact SUVs like the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V as their preferred vehicle ...

The Fed is on Bubble Watch

Derek Abrams, Economics

Haunted by the subprime crisis, the Fed has become more proactive in its monetary management of the U.S. economy.  ...

Gazprom Is Losing Its Market Muscle

Derek Abrams, Economics

Gazprom is Russia’s state-controlled behemoth gas company. It has played a dual role as an instrument of foreign p ...

For Indebted Russians, a Holiday Staycation

Derek Abrams, Economics

The Russian government has imposed travel restrictions on its citizens who have unpaid bills and overdue loans.  Th ...

Apps That Fight Your Parking Tickets

Eric Cardella, Economics

The price of traditional legal counsel is expensive, ranging from around $175 per hour to more than $550 per hour. The h ...

From War Zone to Workplace

Derek Abrams, Economics

Traditionally, veterans experience higher rates of employment than the general population, but the opposite has bee ...

Giving New Meaning to Flying Cattle Class

Eric Cardella, Economics

Recently, Austria cattle ranchers have started transporting via large jets live cattle from Australia to mainland C ...

Slapping a 'Natural' Label on Everything

Eric Cardella, Economics

A quick walk through the grocery store aisle will quickly reveal a new and growing trend among food manufacturers. They ...

The Trouble With Saving 21 Trillion Yuan

Derek Abrams, Economics

The Chinese economy is not running efficiently. The Chinese government is collecting too much money from the public ...

Coming Face to Screen with Baristas

Eric Cardella, Economics

Starbucks has recently announced that it's planning on rolling out new video screens in drive-thru lanes at 2,400 locati ...

Decisions, Decisions

Derek Abrams, Economics

Researchers on Fed policy are discovering that rate cuts affect rich and poor consumers differently. New research shows ...

Smartphone Margins

Eric Cardella, Economics

Sony has recently developed a new phone called the Xperia M4 Aqua with rounded edges, a sleek look, a 13-megapixel camer ...

Buying a Diploma Is Easy If You Can Pay Up

Derek Abrams, Economics

Educational corruption is a challenge facing many countries. This type of corruption occurs at all levels of education s ...

Oil Crashes, and the Sand Market Follows

Eric Cardella, Economics

Tumbling oil prices over the past several months have had significant negative impacts on oil companies, oil service com ...

A Syrian Lawyer Took a Job as a Janitor to Learn More About Germany

Derek Abrams, Economics

Germany and other European nations have been confronted with large numbers of refugees from the Middle East and Africa. ...

Dairy Farmers at the Barricades

Eric Cardella, Economics

A quick canvas of dairy farmers around the world will yield the same sentiment that prices are low and times are tough. ...

Those Inflation Targets Keep Getting Harder to Hit

Derek Abrams, Economics

With slowed global growth and trade, central bankers are currently finding it very difficult to meet their inflation goa ...

The Sharing Economy Comes to the Farm

Eric Cardella, Economics

Farmers often invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in specialized farm equipment and machinery. This expensive equipm ...

To Eclipse the U.S., China Needs to Stop Fighting Itself

Derek Abrams, Economics

Several years ago, China began an ambitious plan to transform its economy from one of an export-led model to a consumpti ...

Is a $15 Minimum Wage Too High?

Derek Abrams, Economics

Fast food workers have recently staged protests in major American cities demanding a $15 hourly wage. While some cities ...

Networks Outsource Their Networking

Eric Cardella, Economics

The demand by consumers to access direct online streaming of media content to televisions, computers, tablets, and phone ...

Italy Leans While Greece Tumbles

Derek Abrams, Economics

Italy is second in the European Union to Greece in terms of having the highest debt as a percentage of GDP.  Yet wh ...

The Whiff of Price-Fixing Is Up In the Air

Eric Cardella, Economics

In 1982, Robert Crandall, a senior executive at American Airlines, told the CEO of Brandiff Airlines, “I have a su ...

Spain's Creating Plenty of Jobs—Lousy Ones

Derek Abrams, Economics

For years, Spain and its citizens have suffered from high levels of unemployment. However, in 2014, the Spanish economy ...

Putin's Economic Solution

Derek Abrams, Economics

The sanctions imposed by Europe and the United States have had a strong, negative effect on the Russia's economy. As a r ...

The SUVs Are in Aisle 7, Past the Olive Oil

Eric Cardella, Economics

There is a growing movement in the automobile retailing industry toward haggle-free pricing models, which is primarily b ...

Big Pharma and Insurers Play Nice

Eric Cardella, Economics

Recently, a pharmaceutical company, Gilead Sciences, developed and manufactured a Hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi. The initial ...

Dubai Tries to Squeeze its A380s Into Formation

Eric Cardella, Economics

The Dubai International Airport is faced with solving a problem that most airports wished they had: determining how to h ...

Wine Wars

Eric Cardella, Economics

Although its roots date decades ago, the “natural” wine movement has gained substantial momentum among ...

Owning Your Home Is Good for the Kids

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The share of Americans who own homes peaked at 69.2 percent in 2004. The share has steadily declined since then and was ...

The Chinese Can’t Kick Their Savings Habit

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Households in China saved almost nothing in the years before Deng Xiaoping launched reforms in 1978, according to &ldquo ...

Greece: A Scary Calendar of Payments Due

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Greece owes 324 billion euros to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Central Bank, and euro zone governm ...

The Oil States Break Open the Piggy Banks

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. government estimates the members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), excluding Iran, a ...

U.S. Consumers Will Open Their Wallets Soon Enough

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. personal savings rate was 5.8 percent in February—the highest rate since 2012, according to “U.S. C ...

Abe’s Rust Belt Problem

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Japan’s prime minister Abe took office in 2012. For two decades prior to his election, Japan was in economic stagn ...

The Not-So-Almighty Dollar

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The dollar has risen 29 percent against the euro, according to “The Not-So-Almighty Dollar” (Bloomberg Busin ...

Venezuela’s Currency Is a Boon to Smugglers

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Venezuelan president Nicolás Maduro’s policy of keeping consumer goods, gasoline, and food cheaper than any ...

The Hunt for China’s Real Growth Numbers

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Chinese government says economic growth in 2014 was 7.4 percent, according to “The Hunt for China’s Real ...

How Productive is the U.S.?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Productivity is defined as output per hour worked. Productivity in American businesses has risen by an annual rate of 0. ...

Greeks Face a Wall Few Nations Surmount

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Four years ago, as part of a bailout program, Greece agreed to what has become known as an austerity program. The auster ...

Finally, Good News for Workers at the Bottom

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The labor force grew by an estimated 700,000 from December to January after taking into account an annual revision of th ...

The Kids Leave Home

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Millennial generation comprises those born between 1982 and 1994. The Great Recession has had an interesting impact ...

U.S. Companies Grow Older and Hire Less

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Economists Steven Davis (University of Chicago) and John Haltiwanger (University of Maryland) have published a new paper ...

The U.S. Welcomes the Good Kind of Deflation

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Because of a slowdown in the global demand for crude oil and an increase in its global supply, the price of crude oil an ...

The Working Poor Confound the Experts

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The labor force participation rate measures the percentage of people who have jobs or are actively looking for work (the ...

Oil’s Price Plunges—What’s Not to Like?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The price of crude oil continues to drop. This week crude oil contracts fell below $50 a barrel. Many are asking one que ...

China is Losing Some of Its Appetite for Coal

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

China’s coal consumption is now growing at a smaller rate. In 2011, coal consumption in China increased 9 percent; ...

Janet Yellen Is in No Hurry to Raise Rates

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

On Dec. 17, the Federal Reserve decided to keep its key interest rate—the federal funds rate—target at zero ...

Consumers May Shrug Off Rate Hikes

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Wells Fargo’s economics team is led by its chief economist John Silvia. His team analyzed the links between spendi ...

U.S. GDP Is Just a State of Mind

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Bloomberg Businessweek writes that the eighty-fifth most disruptive idea in our history is the concept of gross domestic ...

Ordinary Russians Suffer Ruble Shock

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Russian ruble experienced a dramatic fall in 2014. Indeed, the ruble had its worse year since 1998. The decline bega ...

For Japan, Steady Growth Proves Elusive

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Japan increased its sales tax 60 percent earlier this year, from 5 to 8 percent.  Since that fiscal policy change, ...

Legacy of the Wall

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

On Nov. 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall fell. The fall triggered a series of events that would ultimately end with the collapse ...

Will Americans Finally Get a Raise?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Average earnings in the United States haven’t risen in more than six years, according to “Will Americans Fin ...

The Coming Year Of the Bear?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

China has experienced enormous economic growth since 1977. Indeed, former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers and Harvard e ...

The Saudi Balancing Act

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Saudi Arabia has the ability to pump as many as 12.5 million barrels of crude oil a day and it has reserves of 266 billi ...

Why the Strong Dollar is Messing Things Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The value of the U.S. dollar is rising once again. The price of regular unleaded gasoline in the U.S. is the lowest it&r ...

Africa Is Bigger Than You Think

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Africa accounts for more of the world’s economic activity than previously thought, according to “Africa Is B ...

The Global Economy Is Awash in Cheap Oil

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The global price of a barrel of oil is falling. There appears to be two reasons for the declining price of oil: not enou ...

Australia Reinvents Itself

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The negative side effects of globalization are beginning to impact Australia. While most of the world was dealing with t ...

The Incredible Stickiness of Wages

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Stickiness is a fact of life, says Columbia economist Stephanie Schmitt-Grobe. Sticky wages or “downward nominal w ...

This Apple Was Once Headed to Russia. Not Anymore.

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The European Union (EU) and the United States imposed sanctions on Russia this year because of Russia’s actions in ...

In Brazil, It’s Reading, Writing, and Reelection

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Upon entering office in January 2011, President Dilma Rousseff promoted free vocational training, scholarships, and subs ...

Putin’s Paradox

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

President Vladimar Putin has defied the West over Ukraine. But in doing so Putin’s actions have boosted pride and ...

How Much Surplus Labor Do We Have?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

What is the state of the U.S. labor market? This is the question monetary policy makers are wrestling with today. There ...

Argentines Gird For a Financial Storm

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Argentina failed to make a payment to bondholders on July 30, 2014. It marked the eighth time that the country has defau ...

Tax-Averse French Discover Portugal

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

For the last three years, the French government under president Hollande has taxed incomes above €1 million at 75 p ...

Turning Ethiopia Into China’s China

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Ethiopian workers are now manufacturing shoes for Chinese companies that will ultimately be sold to customers in the Uni ...

Yellen’s Philosophy: The More Data, the Better

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

As of March 2014, Janet Yellen ha been the Federal Reserve Chairwoman. In crafting monetary policy, she pays close atten ...

The Fight to Export U.S. Oil

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

New technology has helped to increase U.S. oil production to more than 8 million barrels a day, the highest level of pro ...

Inflation’s Up, Spending’s Down

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The economy is getting more difficult to navigate for the typical U.S. consumer. This is because consumer prices are ris ...

The 23-Year-Olds Will Save America

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Americans in their early 20s will likely prosper while also paying to keep entitlements viable for older generations, ac ...

Mexico’s Narcos Scare Oil and Gas Investors

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

In Mexico’s Tamaulipas state, drug cartels are fighting for control of the U.S drug market. The problem (beside th ...

America’s Got Milk And China Wants It

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

U.S. dairy farmers are very happy. The dairy marketplace once experienced enormous domestic surpluses, but now global sh ...

Who Cares About Keystone XL?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico was first proposed in 2008. More than six years later, the U. ...

Yellen’s First 100 Days Were All About Jobs

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

In her first 100 days, Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen has emphasized the central bank’s full-employment goal, stressi ...

Choosing Profits Over Productivity

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Productivity is defined as output per hour worked. In the U.S., productivity has averaged less than 1 percent a year sin ...

Why Oil Prices Haven’t Gone Crazy

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The collective troubles in Libya, Iran, Nigera, and Venezuela have decreased the supply of oil from these countries. In ...

Britain Grows After Feeling the Pain

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The British economy has had positive economic growth for five successive quarters, with the economy growing at an annual ...

Help Wanted Signs Are Popping Up in U.S. Cities

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. labor market appears to be healing one metro area at time, according to recent data released by the U.S. Labor ...

Merkel Gets Tough on Russia

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The winter Olympics are over and Crimea is part of Russia. Plus, recent events suggest something ominous is happening in ...

Millennials Still Feel the Recession’s Bite

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Persons 40 years old or younger are members of the millennial generation. Millennials have been negatively impacted by t ...

The Richest Rich Are in A Class by Themselves

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The wealth of the top 0.01 percent of Americans has quadrupled since the early 1980s, according to economists Emmanuel S ...

Australia Is Immune To China’s Flu

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

China has developed an appetite for Australian iron ore, wheat, and other commodities, according to “Australia Is ...

The Dismal Economics of Megadams

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Belo Monte, set in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, will be the world’s third-largest dam. When the last turbine ...

The GDP in 2017 Is Not Looking Good

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) decreased its forecast of U.S. potential GDP on February 28. The output gap— ...

French Beret Makers: Then There Was One

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Laulhère expects to make almost 200,000 berets in 2014, up from 160,000 in 2013, according to “French Beret ...

A Lone Wolf Cries, 'Inflation!'

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

David Rosenberg predicts wages and rents in the United States will head higher as the job and housing markets rebound an ...

Colombia Likes Strong Coffee, but a Weak Peso

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Colombian peso has declined 5 percent this year, touching a four-year low of 2,061.13 versus the dollar on Feb. 6, a ...

Northeast's Record Natural Gas Prices Due to Pipeline Dearth

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

In New England, the price of natural gas increased to $123 per thousand cubic feet on Jan. 23, which is nearly 35 times ...

Crime Hobbles Venezuela’s Economy

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Venezuela’s official murder rate is 39 per 100,000 people. However, the Venezuela Violence Observatory, a nongover ...

The Good News About Slow-Motion Cash

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The speed at which a dollar moves from one transaction to another is referred to as the velocity of money. The measure i ...

The Next Big Threat to the U.S. Economy?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The New York Federal Reserve is now actively measuring the size of student loan debt and its potential influence on the ...

After 90 Years, German Inflation Angst is Fading

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Hyperinflation occurs when inflation spirals out of control. A recent example of hyperinflation occurred in Zimbabwe, wh ...

Rousseff’s Reelection Calculus

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Inequality in Brazil has fallen over the last decade. The Gini coefficient, a measure of inequality, fell 5.08 points fo ...

Enough With The Belt Cinching

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Governments around the globe are beginning to loosen their fiscal belts. While earlier cost-cutting efforts remain in pl ...

How Inequality Became a Household Word

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

In 2007, economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty showed that the income share of the top 1 percent had reached a lev ...

Robert Shiller Is Smarter Than You Are

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Robert Shiller collected his 2013 Nobel prize for economics in Stockholm on December 8. Shiller has famously warned us o ...

Mexico’s Surprising Engineering Strength

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Mexico doubled the number of students enrolled in engineering programs between 2007 and 2011, according to “Mexico ...

Mr. Negative

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Larry Summers, a Harvard University economist, is pessimistic about the U.S. macro economy. In a November 8, 2013, speec ...

The Long Wait for Rising Rates

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy on Sept. 15, 2008. That event set off a banking crisis in the U.S. that lingers wit ...

More Retirees + Poorer Workers = Big Trouble

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

in recent decades, U.S. economic growth has averaged 3 percent per year. And in recent years, the consumption of goods a ...

What’s Roiling the Waters Of Global Trade

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

There’s a problem, Houston. Until recently, economic analysts predicted that weak domestic demand would be supplem ...

A Keystone Pipeline That’s Ready to Roll

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

To the surprise of many, the southern portion of the Keystone XL pipeline, dubbed Keystone Gulf Coast, is almost built a ...

Rural Banks Know Something Big Bank Don’t

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Community banks in rural areas of the United States are doing well. A community bank is defined as a bank with assets of ...

Liberté, Egalité…and Shopping on Sunday

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

A 1906 French law forbids most stores to open on Sunday and requires them to close no later than 9 p.m. on weekdays. The ...

The Trouble With Fed Transparency

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Federal Reserve has a dual mandate from the U.S. Congress: to promote maximum employment and stabilize prices. Chair ...

Greece’s Financial Woes Are Far From Over

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Greece has experienced six years of economic and social turmoil. Although it appears that Greece will post a small budge ...

The Trickle Down Has All But Dried Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

On September 17, the U.S. Census Bureau released its latest report on income and poverty. Data about American men was st ...

Hank Paulson On Facing The Abyss

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Hank Paulson was the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury during the financial crisis of 2008. Prior to 2008, some thought a f ...

Need a New Building? Call the Philippines

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The construction business is historically very inefficient, according to “Need a New Building? Call the Philippine ...

Exports Won’t Give India an Easy Way Out

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

A basic principle of economics informs us that when a country’s currency declines in value, its domestic goods bec ...

Korea’s Daring Bet on The Arctic Sea Lanes

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The economics of global shipping have changed. Hyundai Glovis, the shipping arm of Hyundai Motor, plans to start testing ...

In the U.S., Borrowing Is a Good Idea Again

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Americans household finances have improved greatly, according to “In the U.S., Borrowing Is a Good Idea Again&rdqu ...

Lousy Recovery? Doesn’t Feel Like It

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. economy expanded an annualized rate of 1.1 percent in the first quarter of 2013 and 1.7 percent in the second q ...

India’s Onion Crisis

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

India has an inflation problem. Its consumer price index increased 9.9 percent in the 12 months through June, according ...

Green Shoots In Great Britain

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

After years of austerity, Great Britain’s economy is growing again—albeit at an anemic pace of 0.6 percent i ...

How Egypt’s Economy Toppled a President

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Egypt’s economy is struggling. In 2010, Hosni Mubarak’s last year in office, Egypt experienced a growth rate ...

In Tehran, a Whiff of Economic Change

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Hassan Rohani is the president-elect of Iran. He has a difficult road ahead of him. The Iranian economy is in deep troub ...

China Sends a Message to Banks: Oh, Grow Up

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Peoples Bank of China (PBOC) sent the Chinese financial sector a warning in June: Stop using the shadow-banking sect ...

Companies in China Seek Ways to Cut Costs

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

China’s manufacturing sector is changing. Relative wages paid to factory workers in the interior of China are risi ...

The Long, Slow, but Still-Going Recovery

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. economy is growing. That's the good news. The pace of its growth, however, is much slower—2 percent annua ...

The Battle Over Who Gets U.S. Natural Gas

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S has abundant supplies of natural gas today because horizontal drilling techniques and hydraulic fracturing have ...

The Deficit is Shrinking

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

A series of recent events have caused the U.S. deficit to decrease from $1.1 trillion in 2012 to an estimated $642 milli ...

The Next Crisis for China Lurks in the Shadows

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The shadow-banking sector is free of most government regulations. Most important, shadow banks do not have to follow cap ...

Homeowners Don’t Feel Like Betting the Ranch

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

According to the Case-Shiller home price index, the U.S. housing market bottomed out in autumn 2011. The U.S. housing ma ...

What’s Hot Right Now? Drywall

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. housing market declined 34 percent from its peak in 2006 to its trough in 2011, according to the Case-Shiller h ...

What’s Good for Toyota Isn’t Always Good for Japan

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his hand picked Bank of Japan governor Haruhiko Kuroda say they will spark i ...

The Promise and Peril Of China’s Shale Gas

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. Energy Information Administration has reported that China contains twice the shale-gas (a form of natural gas) ...

In Job Creation, Big Is Often Better

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Recently, big business has accounted for the lion’s share of job growth in the U.S., not small business. New data ...

The Euro Zone Loses Its Raison D’Etre

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

A reason for creating the European Union was to lower the transaction costs of cross boarder trade among participating c ...

The Fed May Be Miscounting the Money Supply

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Professor William Barnett of the University of Kansas is on a crusade to get the Fed to change the way it counts money. ...

Mr. Free Market, Raghuram Rajan, Goes to India

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

University of Chicago professor Raghuram Rajan is now chief economic advisor to the government of India. Rajan believes ...

Payroll Tax Hike? What Payroll Tax Hike?

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Payroll taxes in the United States are back to normal after the expiration of a multiple year reduction of 2 percentage ...

Sequestered America Could Be a Risky Place

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The U.S. government’s so-called sequestration began on the morning of March 2. As of that date, agencies have been ...

The Blues Brothers

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Former Wyoming Republican Senator Alan Simpson and Democrat Erskine Bowles led the 2009 National Commission on Fiscal Re ...

Bond Market and White House Just Disagree

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Obama administration and the bond market disagree about how robust the United States' economic growth will be over t ...

A Harvard Professor Wins Over the French

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Harvard University professor Gita Gopinath has influenced French economic policy. Unlike many other countries, euro-area ...

The Sting of Long-Term Unemployment

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Individuals who are unemployed for more than six months are classified as long-term unemployed. Although 7.9 percent of ...

Fingers Crossed In the Alps

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Despite broad agreement that the world looks better than it did a year ago, attendees at the World Economic Forum in Dav ...

The Surprising Upside To Currency Wars

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

On January 22, the Bank of Japan set a new 2 percent annual inflation target and pledged to expand its purchases of bond ...

Wage Growth May Signal Inflation Ahead

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Fed finds itself at a policymaking crossroads. The Fed’s current monetary policy is a combination of 1) purcha ...

U.S. Cities and States Finally Stir to Life

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The economics of state and local government in the United States are improving. Since the beginning of the great recessi ...

Japan’s Central Bank Is Under Siege

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Newly elected Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe has bold plan for the Bank of Japan (BOJ). He wants the BOJ to agree to ...

Euro Lite

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Traditional optimal currency area theory recommends, among other items, that a currency union have fiscal union. From th ...

Why the Doves Rule at Bernanke’s Fed

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Federal Reserve’s federal open market committee (FOMC) voted 11-1 on Dec. 12 to link future interest-rate incr ...

Japan’s Fear of Risk Is Getting Dangerous

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Nikkei stock average has decreased 76 percent since its 1989 peak. For more than two decades, Japanese have seen the ...

A Legend Says: Step Away From the Blackboard

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

Ronald Coase wrote groundbreaking papers “The Nature of the Firm” published in 1937 and “The Nature of ...

Germany Frets as France Declines

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

In the six months since France’s President Francois Hollande was elected, he has lowered the retirement age for so ...

Aging Boomers are Undermining the Fed

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The great recession has affected the spending behavior of seniors in the United States, most notably baby boomers. As a ...

Spain Plays Chicken with Europe

Brian Kench, Ph.D., Economics

The Spanish unemployment rate rose to 25.8 percent in September, its industrial production has decreased for thirteen mo ...

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

Brian Rinfret was a lifelong Beck’s beer drinker when he noticed that the Beck’s he bought did not seem to taste t ...

Bond Fund Investors Beware!

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

Paul Smith, like many retirees, lost 30 percent of his 401(k) savings when the financial crisis hit. Seeking safety, h ...

Tax Breaks Helped Startups

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

In 2009, the state of Tennessee enacted a law that allowed distilleries to operate in 41 counties in which they had prev ...

Keep Looking for the Economic Benefit

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

The tax rate on long-term capital gains (gains on investments held more than a year) has been at 15 percent since 2003. ...

High School Stadiums, Packed With Loopholes

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

A so-called Robin Hood provision in the Texas state constitution requires that school districts with taxable property va ...

The Automated iPhone Pawn Shop

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D., Economics

While the number of retired cell phones is growing, only a small percentage are being reused or recycled. Individuals ca ...

Ronald Reagan and the 47 Percent

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

Mitt Romney was recently recorded discussing the 47 percent of people who don’t pay federal income taxes, indica ...

France's Fleeing Billionaire

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

France’s two most powerful people are currently at loggerheads. One, Bernard Arnault, is the richest person in Franc ...

The SEC Says Speak Up About Hack Attacks

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

The SEC is increasingly asking companies to disclose when they have been the victim of cyberattacks. The SEC guidelines ...

Can a Harvard MBA Fix India’s Economy?

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

There has been quite a bit of bad news out of India this year. Growth in the first quarter was down from 9.2 percent a y ...

Überhyped Ultrabooks Underperform

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

Ever since the iPad was introduced, other computer manufacturers have been trying to figure out how to regain lost marke ...

Does Anybody Here Have a Tax Plan?

James J. Stewart, DSc, Economics

The Bloomberg Businessweek article Does Anyone Here Have a Tax Plan? (August 13-26, 2012) states that neither of the two ...

Does Anybody Here Have a Tax Plan?

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Each presidential candidate offers a different solution to the budget and tax problems facing the country, yet neither o ...

Chinese Stocks Say Farewell to the U.S.

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Just a few years ago, Chinese companies were clamoring for access to American equity markets. The shortest line to a ...

Wall Street Ignores Personal Finance 101

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

A 401(K) is a popular tax-deferred savings vehicle. They have largely replaced other forms of retirement accounts, and ...

Quick, Name That Commercial!

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D., Economics

This Bloomberg Businessweek article, or graphic section, uses the path of two songs and their artists on Shazam to show ...

The Case for Way More Mandates

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Depending on your perspective, there is a lot to like and a lot to hate about the new health-care mandate. Employers ...

U.S. Automakers Cut Retirees Loose

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

0 0 1 280 1602 Utah State 13 3 1879 14.0 ...

A Fair and Balanced Plan for Eliminating the Corporate Income Tax

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

This Bloomberg Businessweek editorial advances a wild idea to eliminate the corporate tax and treat capital gains like ...

A Global Bond Rally With Grim Tidings

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

You have undoubtedly studied the relationships between interest rates and bond prices. Remember: Rising prices equate to ...

When a 95 Percent Cut Doesn't Cut It

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

American companies pay a 35 percent tax rate. This is higher than the rate in many other countries. As a result, global ...

When Animal Spirits Attack

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The Financial Accounting Standards Board has spent years developing a conceptual model that identifies the primary objec ...

The Prescience of the Crowd

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Estimize is yet another Internet startup. It posts estimates of upcoming earnings-per-share announcements. And its initi ...

A Tax Windfall from the Housing Bust

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

For whatever reason, the Internal Revenue Code includes provisions allowing homeowners to deduct their home mortgage ...

Outmanned, Outgunned, And On a Roll

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The lure of fast, easy money has tempted many to manipulate financial data and/or trade based on inside information. Too ...

Buffett Rule or Not, Most Rich People Already Pay

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Warren Buffett has two things going his way: lots of money and a very low tax rate. The tax code favors c ...

A Mega-Millionaire's Crusade Against Taxes

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Rex Sinquefield is a wealthy man. He's a retired business executive frustrated with inequities he sees in his state's ta ...

Expert Debriefing: Medical Device Tax

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

You've heard of income taxes, value-added taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, payroll taxes, and other ...

Small Business Confusion

J. Vincent Eagan, JD, Ph.D. , Economics

Several articles in Bloomberg Businessweek (March 26-April 1, 2012) summarize a variety of aspects of the cu ...

Payday

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The Carlyle Group is a large investment partnership. It is currently contemplating going pubic through an initial public ...

Savings at the Jet Junkyard

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

What is a fuel guzzling, but functional airplane really worth? Many airlines have been sending these aircraft to the jun ...

Obama Spoils for an Election Year Tax Fight

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

President Obama recently unveiled a proposal to cut corporate tax rates from 35 percent to 28 percent. Of course, in ...

The Silencing of Michael Woodford

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Olympus's new CEO soon started asking questions about some rather large and not so logical tra ...

MF Global's Collapse Has Ranchers Steamed

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The failure of MF Global created new rules that provide for an insurance account in the event of a future failure. There ...

The Hidden Burden of Ultra-Low Interest Rates

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Policy directives have stressed low interest rates, at least through 2014. The idea is that low rates will boost borrowi ...

Charlie Rose Talks to the SEC's Robert Khuzami

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Some claim the SEC is asleep at the switch, going easy on false reporting and other securities law violations. Others cl ...

Carlyle Wants to Bar the Courthouse Door

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Can you give away your rights? It depends on the circumstances. Perhaps you have sign ...

Tom Keene Talks to Austan Goolsbee

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Ask Austan Goolsbee, as did the Bloomberg Businessweek reporter for this story, and you will get a consistent answer. He ...

Behind Every Great Woman

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Look around your accounting classroom and you will find that woman probably take up more than half of the seats. This ...

Another Yellow Metal Shines

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The right to drive a yellow cab around Mahattan requires a highly regulated ...

Deposit $1 Billion, Get a Massive Tax Break

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

It is no secret that the United States is among the highest corporate tax venues in the worl ...

Taking Girls’ Internet Fashions to the Mall

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Chapter 8 of principlesofaccounting.com provides in-depth coverage of inventory accounting, and discusses how ratio an ...

What Congress Didn’t do on Its Summer Vacation

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The big debate is about taxes and debt. In the absence of an agreement, however, the results will be about spending. ...

Deciphering the CEO Spin on U.S. Taxes

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

It is true that the U.S. corporate tax rate is among the highest. Just read the article and look as ...

Hey (Hey), You (You), Stop Taxing My Cloud

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The cloud computing market should exceed a quarter of a trillion dollars per year within 10 years. This mea ...

Brian Moynihan’s Credibility Crunch

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Bank of America was once the star of the banking industry. It sported high valuati ...

In India, Tax Evasion is a National Sport

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

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The GOP Heads Straight for the Laffer Curve

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

In 1974, at a dinner with Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney, Art Laffer first sketched the curve that woul ...

Citrix Makes a Run at the Cloud

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Citrix Systems, an enterprise software company, is on a quest to remake itself into a cloud- ...

Grumpy Old Car Guys

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

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Income for Life? Sure, But What Does it Cost?

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Insurance companies calculate how much they can afford to pay to aging persons who decide to exchange a lump sum ...

Hard Choices

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Meredith Whitney has accumulated a reputation as a savvy prognosticator via her timely predictions of failure ...

Grilling Taxpayers on Offshore Accounts

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

With all the intrigue of a James Bond thriller, this Bloomberg Businessweek article details how an initial tax ...

Why People Buy Stock in Bankrupt Companies

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Before reading Why People Buy Stock in Bankrupt Companies, Bloomsberg Businessweek, May 23, 2011, ...

How Buffett’s Ride on the Rails is Paying Off

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

According to How Buffett's Ride on the Rails is Paying Off, Bloomsberg Businessweek, May 16, 2011, when Ber ...

A Wall Street Scion’s Expensive Education

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Many foreign companies would love to access to the U.S. equity markets. Now, they have discovered a quick and ch ...

The Latest Batch of Earnings Disappoints

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The study of accounting reported in The Latest Batch of Earnings Disappoints, Boomberg Businessweek, May 2 ...

Show Them The Money

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Facebook, Twitter, Zynga and other ...

For Investors, the Shine Is Off the New GM

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

General Motors filed for bankruptcy not so long ago. Rather than just closing its doors, however, the government stepp ...

The More you Make, the Less you Pay

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA, Economics

For the well-off, this could be the best tax day since the early 1930s: Top tax rates on ordinary income, di ...

Japan's Rolling Blackouts Dim Prospects for Recovery

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The tragedy in Japan is of epic proportion. Not only will cleanup and construction crews be busy, but accountan ...

A Cash-Flow Crisis is the Recession’s Legacy

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Prior to reading the article, review Chapter 7 of principlesofaccounting.com, which shows how to use fi ...

Profits on an Overseas Holiday

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Generally, repatriation is a term used to describe the process of bringing a captured solider back home. It also has a ...

The Heavyweight Brawl Over Debit-Card Fees

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Before moving forward, please review accounting for credit-card transactions in Chapter 7 of principlesofaccou ...

GE’s Tax-Break Guard Dogs

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The Bloomberg Businessweek article, GE ...

The Phenom of the Opera

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Colin Lee, a rising opera singer, started out as an accountant and then became a corporate finance manage ...

The Great Regulatory Holdup

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Government regulators, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission, have been handed a litany of mandates. T ...

Whitney’s Muni Forecast Is Short on Specifics

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Chapter 13 of principlesofaccounting.com provides a very typical presentation of how the market prices bonds. Textbook ...

Corporate Taxes: The Multinational Advantage

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The statutory U.S. corporate tax rate is among the highest in the world. There is a long-running debate about whether ...

A Stock-Bond Hybrid That Flopped

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Convertible bonds have been around for years. They enable the holder to convert the bond into stock worth more ...

Why Medicare Can’t Catch the Fraudsters

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Accountants are trained to establish and maintain control systems to safeguard assets. Apparently Medic ...

Stuck: In Foreclosure Limbo

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The Hassell family bought a nice house in 1997 at a fair price of around $200,000. Subsequently, the price soared to m ...

An International Spat Over Bank Bookkeeping

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The ongoing convergence project to bring U.S. and global accounting standards into harmony has hit yet anothe ...

A Way For Outsiders to Bet on Facebook

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

Chapter 14 of principlesofaccounting.com makes a clear distinction between public and private companies. A typical ...

Bank Dividends May Be Set to Rebound

Larry Walther, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, Economics

The economic downturn hit banks especially hard. Earnings were hammered by write-offs of bad loans, causing a d ...

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