Sectors

Readings: Sports & Entertainment

Strength in Numbers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Fitbit’s new Ionic is positioned squarely in competition with Apple’s latest smartwatch. Both can replace your Garmin while serving as a platform for app development. Projected market growth from $20 billion today to $34 billion by 2020 is up for grabs.

Can Sports Licensing Score Outside the United States?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

U.S.-style sports merchandise could be a tougher sell abroad. Two billionaires bet they can sell sports swag to the world. Fanatics Inc. plans global push after $1 billion investment.

The Tall and Short of Horizontal and Vertical Mergers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Even though such vertical mergers are usually of less concern to antitrust regulators, the Justice Department may sue to block the proposed $85 billion merger of AT&T Inc. and Time Warner Inc. AT&T is looking to show that the opposition is politically motivated based on Trump’s tweets against the deal and against Time Warner’s CNN.

Tickets Aren't Selling for the 2018 Winter Olympics

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

An escalation in military tension is scaring tourists away from South Korea. Corporate scandals have also diverted attention from the 2018 Winter Olympics Games there.

Cybersecurity: The Next Hack Will Turn Your Lights Off

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The next big cyberattack could turn America's lights off. Security experts say there's evidence Russian hackers have breached U.S. utilities and nuclear power plants.

Apple Has Big Plans for Your Little Screen

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple will spend $1 billion next year on programming for television. By sticking with mainstream shows, it could miss out on viewers who increasingly favor edgier fare.

Apple Has Big Plans for Your Little Screen

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple wants to stick with family-friendly fare as it produces $1 billion of original streaming TV content next year. But its first two shows fell flat, and some in Hollywood are questioning Apple’s direction or even whether it has a strategy.

A Different Way to Cut Kids from the Squad

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Sports teams search for early signs of exceptional talent so that they can sign the best athletes before competitors do. This is nowhere more evident than in soccer. Major teams begin intensive recruiting and sign players in their teens, but it's very expensive to take a potential athlete through an entire program, only to have them not pan out. Ilja Sligte, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Amsterdam, of devised a cognitive test to predict which athletes have the greatest likelihood of success and at what position. Thus far, his company, BrainFirst, has several clients despite no empirical evidence that the product works. BrainFirst predicts it will be profitable this year.

Adidas Automates to Make Shoes Faster

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Adidas' new "Speedfactories" in Germany and the U.S. will use automation to get new shoe designs to stores in days rather than months. Adidas says this is the biggest revolution in shoe manufacturing since moving production to Asia.

Why Suppliers Will Still Play With Toys ‘R’ Us

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Toys "R" Us Inc. will live because manufacturers such as Mattel and Hasbro can’t let it die. They are offering pledges of support to counter Amazon and Wal-Mart and are propping up this single-category store.

Alibaba Tries to Get in the Game

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

China's disproportionately small sports industry and amateur community reflect decades of limited government support and insufficient disposable incomes. Alibaba's tiny sports arm is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to nurture China's interest in sports and related merchandise.

Myanmar's Hotel Room Glut

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

As Myanmar's government is transitioning, it clearly sees the opportunity for tourism development, and it has strongly encouraged it by creating some of the necessary infrastructural components. Unfortunately, the tourism sector has yet to kick in, and this is causing some consternation.

India's Movie Industry Gets a New Script

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Bollywood makes more than twice as many movies as Hollywood, but profits are limited. Now, other regional filmmakers in India are challenging Bollywood, making for an increasingly difficult industry environment.

India’s Movie Industry Gets a New Script

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

An Indian blockbuster, "Baahubali 2," had box-office revenues of more than $230 million in three weeks. This could spark more films outside the Bollywood mold. India produces 1,500 to 2,000 films a year and generated about $2.2 billion in 2016. It has about six screens per million viewers, versus 23 per million in China and 126 per million in the U.S.

Can VR Find a Seat in the Parlor?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Virtual reality is not a hit at home, so Imax tries arcades. Imax is piloting VR centers, since the cost of equipment has been a drag on consumers’ embrace of virtual reality. Tech and entertainment companies are racing for a slice of the virtual reality business, which Goldman estimates could generate $80 billion in revenue by 2025.

The $200 All-Seeing Line Judge

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

A successful French inventor and tech entrepreneur has developed a $200 device that can detect whether tennis balls are in or out. How will Sony, with its $60,000 system for tournament play, respond to this potentially disruptive innovation?

"Hollywood"

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Trump’s talk of hard line dealing with China over trade has Hollywood worried. The Chinese had promised to further open their lucrative film market this year, and Hollywood doesn’t want anything to change their minds.

"Hollywood"

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The U.S. and Chinese film industries have become increasingly interdependent, with big U.S. studios counting on Chinese financing and ticket sales. Last year the Chinese market generated 19 percent of global box office sales and had higher revenues than U.S. theaters for some films. In addition, Chinese firms have made major investments in U.S. movie theaters and film studios.

No One Wants to Pay $9.99 for Your Remixes

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

German music streaming service SoundCloud is in trouble despite having about 175 million users and the adoration of both artists and fans. Pandora and Spotify face similar problems as they continue to lose money while record labels get most of the streaming revenue.

Hulu Reboots for a Post-Cable Age

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

For owners Comcast, Fox, Disney, and Time Warner, the Internet streaming service Hulu has been their beachhead in the increasingly popular world of video streaming. Now Hulu plans to offer live TV to strengthen its position against leaders Netflix and Amazon but may simultaneously continue to erode their owners’ cable TV businesses.

Welcome to Pride Night

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Professional sports leagues and individual teams are taking steps to create a more inclusive environment for fans and athletes. These include hosting pride nights and LGBT events. The outreach is at least partially motivated by the purchasing power of LGBT fans, but it also involves a potentially challenging cultural and image change for professional sports. Thus far, there is evidence of increased ticket sales as well as push-back and hostility.

How Adidas Got Back in the Game

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Adidas's stock price is seeing a nice rise as the company picks up market share and sponsorship agreements. Part of the rise is fueled by a greater emphasis on fashion, including limited edition shoes. Adidas is also working with music entertainers to have them "design" shoes for the company.

Why Hollywood Makes Digital Magic in the U.K.

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Some of the world's largest digital effects companies are based in Britain, and the recent drop in the value of the British pound is making these firms even more competitive on a global scale. While skilled talent and competitive prices are important for movie studios that are looking for visual effects expertise, tax breaks or incentives also play a role in attracting portions of the movie business to Britain. Great tax deals in Canada, however, are now causing the British firms to shift some of their work to offices in Vancouver and Montreal.

Snooze

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

An Olympics TV ratings slip among viewers age 18-34 is raising questions about NBC’s ability to profit from the games long term. One reason: Sports fans are getting older.

Will Spotify Live Up to Its $8 Billion Valuation?

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

With technology stocks, IPO valuation is not necessarily related to current or past profitability. This is evident in the estimated IPO value of Spotify, the online music streaming service with 30 million users and $2.2 billion in revenues.

Wheeler Dealer

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Detroit Bikes is helping to bring manufacturing back to motor city. But the economics of making bicycles in the U.S. are challenging.

Stomping Grounds

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Kevin Plank, Under Armour’s founder and CEO, has many ambitions for his company. These include intertwined business and social objectives of becoming world’s biggest sportswear company and revitalizing the city of Baltimore. A passionate and visionary leader, Plank consciously seeks to use the company’s momentum to shape Baltimore’s future.

Designed by Comcast in Philadelphia

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Historically, Comcast has not been one of America’s most loved companies, and it had a reputation for providing clunky cable boxes and poor customer service. But Comcast is changing and wants to be loved. Instead of simply providing cable boxes and access to ever-changing lists of television channels, Comcast wants to make the TV the home’s command center. In doing so, Comcast needs to change its corporate culture to be more like a cool technology company and less like a regulated utility monopoly.

Material Progress: Five Substances of the Future

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

These five substances offer opportunities for secondary innovations that can make a myriad of products perform better.

You Can’t Find the Cat Faster than Nervve

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Nervve is the company that cracked image recognition. Its image-recognition software is used by everyone from the NBA to U.S. intelligence agencies. Sports teams and leagues are using Nervve’s software to assess the value of in-game advertising.

Disney’s New Cultural Revolution

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Human resource management issues can challenge companies undergoing international expansion; Disney's experiences in China are one example. The company's theme parks depend on character-based entertainment, and in opening its Shanghai resort, talent development has been one of the biggest challenges the Disney has faced. Because there is a limited pool of talent trained in Western performing arts, Disney has needed to be innovative and make substantial investments to recruit and train performers. As competitors plan to open theme parks in China, Disney’s next challenge will be to retain the performers it has trained.

Surf's Up Forever

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Kelly Slater Wave Company has figured out how to build the longest, most perfect, surfing wave on the planet. Can he can build a business around it?

Disney's New Cultural Revolution

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

In preparation for its Shanghai Disneyland theme park, Disney began working with arts institutes in China to build awareness and interest in performing at the park. Part of the challenge was to develop talented performers who could sing in the style of Disney show tunes, such as those in The Lion King. Another part of the challenge was to better understand how Disney productions could be modified to be more interesting to Chinese audiences. In a separate program, Disney launched English language training programs aimed at children two through twelve, with a curriculum that uses Disney characters.

The Greening of Adidas

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Investments in energy efficiency can take years to pay back from cost savings so are often rejected by CFOs. But framing them as a portfolio with returns of over 20 percent convinced Adidas to invest millions per year.

Green Is Good, But One Outdoor Outfitter Puts People First

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Cotopaxi is an outdoor recreation products company with a social mission rather than a more common environmental one. Even though it is a B Corp that gives a share of revenue to humanitarian organizations, it has attracted venture capital funding.

Hollywood Is Running Out of Tombstones

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The U.S. television industry produced more than 400 scripted series last year, a record. That’s causing shortages. An explosion in American television production is threatening to overwhelm filming facilities from California to Canada and Georgia.

Memo From Netflix: 'Ich Bin ein Berliner'

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

In order to attract European customers, an increasing number of content distribution companies like Netflix and Amazon are developing exclusive programs and series. Whereas the exclusive programming that Amazon and Netflix have developed in the U.S. to attract customers has some level of international appeal, in order to gain market share in European countries these firms are investing in original content tailored to each country's language and culture.

For the Perfect Voyage: Private Isles and Ports

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

MSC Cruises is developing a $200 million private island in the Caribbean, part of an industry push to provide the perfect vacation. Carnival spent $85 million developing its private cruise getaway.

Nascar Takes a Page From the NFL Playbook

Eric Cardella  |  Sports & Entertainment

Nascar's new business model, which includes issuing nine-year charter memberships to 36 cars, guarantees cars entrance into every race on Nascar’s top circuit and, as a result, makes it much easier for them to secure sponsorship deals.

The Loonie Is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The National Hockey League (NHL) keeps its books in U.S. dollars, with all revenues expenses earned in other currencies converted to U.S. dollars (not unlike many U.S.-based multinational firms). The recent fall in the Canadian dollar, however, means that the league will be reporting lower overall revenue when the Canadian funds are converted to U.S. dollars. With about a third of the NHL's revenues coming from Canada, an 18% drop in the exchange rate means that revenues would fall around 6%. All player salaries, however, are negotiated in U.S. dollars.

The Loonie is Driving NHL Players Crazy

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Approximately one third of National Hockey League (NHL) revenue is generated in Canada. Since the league’s compensation arrangement is based on revenue sharing and salaries measured and paid in U.S. dollars, the weak Canadian dollar is affecting team owners and players. The revenue sharing arrangement, a variation on profit-sharing, means that players and owners share in the currency risk.

Gaming's Growing Pains

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

As gaming leagues show rapid growth and indications that they're growing profits too, the competitive arena for leagues and teams has ramped up. As profits become more certain, interest from major investors seeking to leverage their economies of scope and scale are beginning to enter the fray. In question are the distribution of overall industry profits (appropriation) throughout the key stakeholder groups involved and how the cooperation can create even more value.

Spotify Isn’t Laughing Off This Lawsuit

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

A lawsuit could result in Spotify having big liabilities from unpaid royalties. How much are these potential liabilities? And how is Spotify dealing with them?

A Tiny Speed Bump for Streaming’s Advance

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

British singer Adele and Sony Music Entertainment are betting fans will show up at record stores and on iTunes to buy a copy rather than stream it on Apple Music and Spotify. The initial sales data suggests they are right. There are questions if this phenomenon will slow the growth of streaming services.

New York Gambles on A Daily Fantasy Ban

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

The attorney general of the State of New York is threatening the fantasy football industry. The top three competitors are responding very differently, but the primary concern is that other states will follow suit and substantially change the laws that govern fantasy football.

Carnival Rocks the Boat

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Carnival’s CEO, Arnold Donald, has replaced seven of the company’s nine cruise line heads, and given them a charge to think outside the box to reach new customers. Donald believes that a diverse group of people working together can outperform a more homogenous group 90 percent of the time. His new cruise line heads reflect this philosophy. In an industry that is male-dominated and white, four of Donald’s new cruise line heads are women, one is black, one is gay, and some have no experience in the industry.

Faux-Rock Stars

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Indoor rock climbing gyms are being opened worldwide, and the world's largest builder (Walltopia) comes from an unlikely location - Bulgaria. Two and a half hours outside Sofia, in the small town of Letnitsa, is a factory that has supplied walls to gyms in more than 50 countries. Through a combination of cheap labor, innovative designs, and willingness to develop custom walls for clients, Walltopia has gained a loyal worldwide customer base for their climbing walls.

The Netflix Effect is Spreading

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Internet video economics will increasingly favor original, higher-value productions. Call it the "Netflix effect."

The Netflix Effect is Spreading

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Original content has become a key success factor for video streaming services that want to compete with Netflix and Amazon. The revenue generated by subscription and rental fees is fueling higher-quality productions than the ad model.

Hang $99.99

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Wavestorm of Taiwan has become the surfboard industry leader by selling soft surfboards for $99.99 exclusively through Costco. Some say WaveStorm is killing the industry with low margins. Others hope it will expand the market and lead to eventual growth in sales of higher-end boards.

Hang $99.99

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Wavestorm surfboards, which launched in 2007 and are sold for $99.99 exclusively through Costco, are now the leading surfboard brand, selling five times more than the closest competitor.

Fantasy Sports Meets Its Match: Lawyers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Fantasy sports sites claim that they're not gambling sites, but states are moving to regulate them like casinos. The most recent round of investigations follows allegations of cheating at two of the leading sites, DraftKings and FanDuel. Who will win this game?

Why Roku Isn’t Going After Gamers

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Roku is not for gamers. CEO Anthony Wood believes that Xbox and Playstation consoles will continue to win over the gaming elite, Apple has too much power and presence in the mobile area, and Roku is choosing to stay clear. Is it a wise strategy?

Why Roku Isn't Going After Gamers

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple, Amazon, and Google all think there is an opportunity to stream games over their new streaming devices. Roku is listening to game makers and gamers who disagree.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Bollywood film studio Eros hopes to build a strong enough position in video streaming to fend off Netflix and Amazon when they enter India. With a large library of its own films, original programs, music videos, and a head start, Eros wants to be the dominant streaming service in India.

Eros Would Love to Become India's Netflix

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Eros is one of Bollywood's largest studios, releasing around 70 movies a year. Hoping to attain a first-mover advantage in advance of foreign rivals such as Amazon and Netflix, Eros is launching a video streaming service.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Netflix is on track to become the first worldwide, online subscription television network. But it may have difficulty selling the same service the same way everywhere, especially in Japan.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Netflix continues to see a growth in revenues, with strong sales in the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, and Brazil. Now the company has its sights set on Asian markets as it rolls out its service in Japan. This, however, will bring new challenges, as Japanese consumers are not used to paying for programming.

Can Netflix Become Must-See TV in Japan?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Netflix has been a Western phenomenon. Betting that streaming will become a global phenomenon, Netflix will expand to more than 150 countries by the end of 2016.

Skechers' Lesson From a Fad That Flopped

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Overproduction combined with an FTC investigation caused Skechers’ Shape-ups shoes to go from fad to fiasco. But the company rebounded. Skechers’ valuation has risen from $600 million at the end of 2011 to about $8 billion today.

A Chinese Lender Bets on East Coast Golf

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

South Carolina's Grand Strand is dotted with golf courses, condos, and resorts. After some recent acquisitions, China-based Yiqian Funding now owns 22 of the golf courses and is adding to its real estate holdings. Yiqian's goals include increasing the number of Chinese tourists, and potential condo owners, to the area.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Saying it has learned from experience in Paris and Hong Kong, Disney has gone to much greater lengths to tailor its new park in Shanghai to Chinese culture and society. Yet retaining an authentic Disney experience may be key to succeeding in China’s increasingly competitive amusement-park industry.

Rethinking Disneyland for the Chinese Family

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Disney is preparing to open a new theme park outside Shanghai that blends standard Disney features with Chinese themes. It also has to adapt to the Chinese demographic, where, as a result of the one-child policy, it is expected that there will be four adults for every one child at the park.

A Bay Area Startup Spins Lab-Grown Silk

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Bolt Threads expects products made with its yeast cell-based silk to be available in 2016.

L.A. Fans Pray for an NFL Team of Their Own

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Two Los Angeles suburbs have approved big-ticket stadium projects in the hope of luring an NFL team.

The Law Comes for FIFA

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

After a raid and seven arrests, questions of bribery and corruption surround the organization that runs global soccer.

The Secret Sauce

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

How Buffalo Wild Wings turned the sports bar into a $1.5 billion juggernaut.

Japanese Engineers Reinvent the Wheel

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Two inventors found it easier to build $7,900 bike wheels than to sell them.

The NBA’s Hoop Dream: World Domination

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

About 300 million Chinese play basketball, and the NBA hopes to use that fan base to someday eclipse soccer’s popularity. With that dream be realized?

"Fifty Shades" Protest Force Twinings to Abandon Racy Promotion

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

The British tea company Twinings has bowed to pressure from activists and customers and pulled a promotion linked to the R-rated movie “Fifty Shades of Grey.” Meanwhile, the box office prepares for a blockbuster success.

Why Brands Love China's Sex And The City

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Western brands vie for product placement on China's hit shows, and often don't even have to pay for the publicity.

Why Brands Love China’s Sex And The City

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

The Tiny Times movies have pulled in $208 million at the box office, making them attractive for promoting luxury brands to an affluent and young Chinese market.

Now at the Sands: Iranian Hackers in Every Server

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Increasing cybersecurity is one way for U.S. corporations to respond to hackers who can cripple operations and steal valuable data. Should corporations also be able to retaliate?

Bob Costas on Baseball Free Agency's Evolution

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Some fans thought it meant the end of baseball. But free agency proved to make baseball fairer . . . and maybe even a little more interesting.

What Do Video Games Have Against Women?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Although a media critic is harassed for challenging sexism in video games, the industry's lack of inclusiveness may hurt its future.

The Whale Stays in the Picture

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Can SeaWorld overcome the backlash over its treatment of marine animals?

Me? Yes, Taylor.

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

The most influential artist in the music industry is young, successful, and confronting the streaming music format.

Expert Outlook: Kevin Plank

Craig A. Turner, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

A great innovative company doesn't rely on its early success for extension; it leans on its brand reputation.

Adidas's World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Adidas's sales in the United States are down 14 percent this year due to weak sales in basketball and golf.

Adidas’s World Cup Win Only Goes So Far

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Too European? Adidas leads the industry in soccer globally, but it hasn't been able to bring in enough U.S. fans as sales fell 14 percent in the first half of 2014.

Find the Women in This Crowd

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Purchases of pay-per-view events for Ultimate Fighting Championship matches have fallen by one third since 2010. The response to this decline is to attract more women to the “human cockfighting” sport with a reputation for domestic violence. The effort will be a challenge.

Who Do We Under-Compensate?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Is zero a fair wage for NFL cheerleaders?

Why Apple’s iBeacon Hasn’t Taken Off—Yet

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple’s year-old indoor-tracking technology hasn't broken out from its pack of rivals.

Jeff Bewkes’s Disappearing Act

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Investors have cheered as Jeff Bewkes systematically dismembered Time Warner and raised the value of its stock. But at what cost?

You Know You Want Him

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

How does a first-generation American move into the role of becoming a highly sought after spokesperson and a business-empire builder? Rapper Pitbull does it one partnership at a time.

Another World Cup Surprise: TV Ratings

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

After tremendous doubt about Brazil’s ability to make it happen, the World Cup wins. The match between the U.S. and Portugal on ESPN drew 18.2 million viewers, a record for soccer. Brave World Cup sponsors could not be happier.

Sony Bets It Can Find The Next Big Thing

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Despite mounting losses, Sony is increasing spending on R&D and releasing new products like the SmartBand, which it hopes will be the next big thing.

Streams of Tears

James Richardson, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Streaming music services are having a difficult time capturing any value for themselves or their music suppliers.

The Song Remains Pretty Similar

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Was Led Zeppelin's Stairway to Heaven a copy?

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Nike is making a big push to catch Adidas in the soccer gear market.

Shootout: Can Nike Beat Adidas at Soccer?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

An estimated 300 million people play the game and 1 billion people watch it. Soccer represents a growing global market and Nike wants to take it over.

Aereo's Survival Depends on Semantics

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The Supreme Court's decision about online streaming could cause the end of a company.

Casinos Know When to Fold 'Em

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Is gambling revenue a dependable source of income for state governments?

Can Amazon Find Room by the TV?

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Amazon has stepped into the living-room turf war with its streaming Fire TV, but it’s in for a tough fight.

Big Mickey Is Watching

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Mickey is tracking your every move. Disney is betting a billion dollars that RFID wristbands will create a better experience. Will it work?

Bad Sports

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The academic fraud scandal at the University of North Carolina reveals ways that the university has failed its athletes.

Your Wilting Retirement

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

According to hundreds of government filings analyzed by Bloomberg, 18 percent of companies have reduced the amount or delayed payment of 401(k) matching funds and dragged out vesting schedules. For many, that could mean the difference between financial security and scarcity in old age.

Why Is This Man Smiling?

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Do you want your cable company to be bigger and have more control over what you watch and how you get online access? Comcast does, and it's spent more than $75 billion in acquisitions to make that happen.

We're So Sorry

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The responses of university officials seem almost as irresponsible as the failures underlying the academic scandals involving the University of North Carolina's athletic programs. To some extent, attitudes seem to be changing.

Sony Bets That Jazz Can Still Be Hip

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Sony has revived a record label for jazz, a genre that sold 14 million albums in 2007 but only 5 million albums in 2013. Is the jazz audience still willing to pay to listen?

Not Another Music Streaming Service!

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Is the digital music market saturated? Beats says its brand cachet will give it an edge in the chase for 29 million streaming music subscribers worldwide.

How Imgur Became a Photo-Sharing Hit

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

How many photo-sharing sites can consumers tolerate?

Snapchat for the Corner Office

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Shredding is out; self-destruct messages are in.

The Biggest, Cheapest Network of All

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Why ignore the biggest communication network in the world? The fastest and largest network is the one we have all been building together, router by router. It's changing the face of the wireless industry.

Thank You For Vaping

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Scented vapors with my nicotine, please.

Xbox One Tears Down Microsoft’s Walls

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Microsoft’s Xbox One has the hope that games and entertainment will collide into something even bigger and better. Will it make a difference in the decline of console purchases?

Rebuilding Lego for Today's Kids

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Sports & Entertainment

Lego, which controls about 60 percent of the construction-toy business, is wooing older children with a $350 robot set.

Rebuilding Lego for Today’s Kids

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Lego has expanded its product lineup and tapped into Internet-based opportunities to fuel growth.

Apple's Got You

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple is quietly seeding its mobile devices with iBeacon, which provides impressive location-based tracking. Why is the company being so quiet about this new technology?

Smut With A Smile

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Promoting the mantra “Keep Calm and Chive On,” TheChive.com is a tacky little frat-boy-like site –- with an annual revenue stream approaching $100 million.

A British Invasion Without the Mop Tops

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

British television producers look to global markets, including the United States, when developing new television shows.

The NFL Concussion Deal's Surprise Winner

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The proposed settlement of the concussion class action suit against the NFL involves compromise on both sides and may have broad social implications.

Splits End

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Only 10 companies in the S&P 500 have carried out stock splits this year, compared with an annual average of 48 since 1980.

Let the Games Begin

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Will Fox Sports 1 be able to compete with ESPN, and how will each of them likely charge per cable subscriber?

Making the Stadium More Like Your Couch

Pedro M. Reyes, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

“When you walk into the stadium, I’ll know everything about you.”

Bond Investors Hope to Avoid a Repeat of '94

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Will clear communications from Bernanke help avoid market disruptions when the Fed finally allows interest rates to rise?

Usain Bolt: The App

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Can the garage developer survive the branded app?

Mobile Games with Megaprofits

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

With a dedicated user base regularly spending big money, mobile gamemaker Supercell turned a 58 percent operating margin last quarter.

Your Phone Knows What You're Watching

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

TV networks are investing in an app that keeps viewers subsidizing the TV ad model even while glancing down at their phone.

An Ex-Wife Threatens Steve Wynn’s Casino Empire

Larry Tunnell, Ph.D., CPA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Steve Wynn might lose control of Wynn Resorts. What effect might this have on the corporation?

Silicon Valley Goes Hollywood

Michael S. Raisinghani, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Recruiters and headhunters are playing matchmaker/agent for freelance programmers by having an A-list of software engineers on speed dial for clients who need coders fast and now. The startups turn to 10X Management for pick-up programming whenever they need it.

The Escape Artist

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

How did Rupert Murdoch and his company's stock price survive a potentially career-limiting phone-hacking scandal?

LinkedIn is Trying to Quicken its Pulse

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Visit more, stay longer. LinkedIn doesn't mind if you do.

The Merger Boom That Fizzled

Delvin D. Hawley, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

The value of global takeover and merger announcements in March was the lowest since July 2009. Why do some think a sharp rebound is coming soon?

China's Journey from Imitator to Innovator

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

You make the call. Are China's Internet companies imitators or innovators?

Welcome Back, Comrade

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Media companies are now producing original content sit-coms, dramas, and mini-series in Eastern European countries.

How Apple's iWatch Can Be a Moneymaker

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Apple sells a lot of electronics, but can it sell the iWatch?

Will Carnival Party On?

Ralph W Flanary, MBA, CFE  |  Sports & Entertainment

Carnival has a history of bouncing back from toxic business problems, but its latest major incident was the third in as many years. So far the stock price hasn't reacted negatively to $80+ million in claims and potential lawsuits, so the long term impact is unclear.

Will Carnival Party On?

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

After a series of mishaps and related public relations disasters, will Carnival's reputation and stock price be able to rebound after the Triumph debacle?

This Theater is Getting Awfully Crowded

Angelina I. T. Kiser, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Is there room for another online streaming service?

Management Secrets from the Meanest Company in America

Katherine Campbell, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

How can the worst company to work for in America be so successful?

Austerity Be Damned: Pass the Remote

Duane Helleloid, Ph.D.  |  Sports & Entertainment

Italy has turned out to be a great market for QVC, with the company's average tele-shopper spending around $1,900 a year.

Pandora is Boxed in by High Royalty Fees

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Growth can be expensive. Competition is tough for Pandora Media, which pays more than 50 percent of its revenue toward royalty payments for artists, while its rivals pay far less. Will the equation change?

Thursday Night Football Scores Big for the NFL

Douglas L. Wilson, MBA  |  Sports & Entertainment

Is Thursday the new football night? The NFL receives $1.1 billion annually from its NFL Network on pay TV as it reserves Thursday night games for its own channel.


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